Non-profit

Silicon Valley Community Foundation

Location:

MOUNTAIN VIEW, CA

Tax ID:

20-5205488

DUNS Number:

01-844-2842

Tax-Exempt Status:

501(c)(3)

Budget (2017):

Revenue: $2,418,011,459
Expenses: $1,895,238,973
Assets: $12,563,909,962

Formation:

2006

CEO:

Nichole Taylor

The Silicon Valley Community Foundation (SVCF) is a left-of-center grantmaking organization with over $11 billion in assets. The Foundation conducts most of its grantmaking through donor-advised fund (DAF) accounts established with oversight from individual donors who can advise how their gifts are distributed for charitable purposes.

SVCF has drawn criticism in recent years as a “Black Hole” for charitable donations because IRS rules and SVCF practice have allowed money to be held in DAF accounts for years with no required minimum payouts to charitable organizations (as are required of private foundations). [1] This allows donors to receive large tax breaks immediately, before the donations benefit charitable causes.

SVCF was rocked by scandal in 2018 when its largest fundraiser, Mari Ellen Loijens, resigned amidst dozens of allegations of abusive management and sexual harassment. An independent investigation by the law firm Boies Schiller Flexner found a number of the allegations “were substantiated,” leading to the ouster of former CEO Emmet Carson following an independent investigation. [2]

History

The Silicon Valley Community Foundation was established in 2007 through a merger of two smaller charities, beginning with $1.7 billion in assets. [3] Since 2007, SVCF has become widely known for its aggressive growth mindset. [4] Until 2017, SVCF experienced relatively moderate growth, expanding from $1.7 billion in assets in 2007 to $5.3 billion in 2017. [5] In that year alone, assets surged to $13.5 billion, surpassing the Ford Foundation. [6] As of May 2019, SVCF was the ninth-largest charity and fifth-biggest donor-advised fund in the United States. [7]

In addition to managing DAFs, SVCF conducts investment research, hosts public discussions, pushes for left-of-center policy outcomes, and generates special projects and initiatives within the Silicon Valley community. [8]

SVCF has drawn considerable criticism for taking in funds without distributing them for charitable purposes. [9] In 2017, SVCF assets grew by 64 percent, but charitable giving in the Bay Area by SVCF dropped by 46 percent, leading one nonprofit consultant to call the foundation the “Black Hole” of charity. [10] SVCF charges fees to hold donor funds in accounts with no minimum payout requirements, meaning that donors receive large, immediate tax breaks for supplying funding that can sit in a DAF indefinitely without actually being disbursed to charity as. [11]

Grantmaking Activity

Grants from SVCF fund a variety of political and charitable causes. In addition to running donor-advised funds, SVCF runs several projects to which donors may give directly. [12] These include funds for the arts, emergency relief, environmentalism, housing, and African development. [13]  SVCF also runs projects for left-of-center immigration assistance, for the Silicon Valley community, and regional development. [14]

In 2017, SVCF, whether through its own charitable programs or in accordance with donor-advised fund-holders’ advice, disbursed a total of $1.8 billion in grants, a mere 16 percent of its total assets. [15]

Grantmaking to other DAFs

In 2017, SVCF gave $725.5 million in grants to other grantmaking institutions, roughly 40 percent of all grants distributed in that year. [16] [17] The largest single donation SVCF made in 2017 was to Fidelity Charitable Gift Fund, another network of DAFs, in the amount of $553,432,667. [18] SVCF distributed another $100,000,000 to Jasper Ridge Charitable Fund. [19] Other established DAF organizations, including Morgan Stanley Global Impact Funding, Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors, and the National Philanthropic Trust also received funding between $6 and $10 million from SVCF. [20] Some have criticized the practice of moving money around between donor-advised funds as an attempt for the very rich to use DAFs in order to avoid taxes, rather than to make charitable contributions. [21]

SVCF also provided grant funding to prominent, controversial fiscal sponsorship organizations for the political left, including the Hopewell Fund ($270,000), NEO Philanthropy ($1,628,311), and the Tides Center and Tides Foundation (combined $37,267,150). [22]

Education

In 2017, SVCF provided substantial grants for education, totaling hundreds of millions of dollars to public school districts, universities, and education advocacy organizations. SVCF provided grants to 91 universities in 2017 alone, including gifts in the tens of millions to Harvard University, Johns Hopkins University, and Princeton University. [23] SVCF provided some of its largest single grants in 2017 to education-focused organizations, including a $13.9 million grant to the College Entrance Examination Board and an $8.2 million grant to College Track, a program that allows underprivileged students to complete college and receive a diploma. [24] SVCF also provided $12 million to Education Super Highway, an organization working to provide high speed internet in schools. [25]

SVCF gave significant funding to organizations that advocate for the expansion of charter schools, providing $9.1 million to Charter Fund Inc, a venture capital organization which funds growth in charter schools. [26] SVCF also provided funding for Pacific Charter School Development ($4,000,000) and Success Academy Charter Schools ($2,000,625). [27]

Criminal Justice and Immigration

The SVCF made substantial grants to left-of-center criminal justice organizations in 2017. The SVCF gave its largest criminal justice-related grant to the Forward US (stylized FWD.us) Education Fund, a left-leaning immigration and criminal justice policy organization, in the amount of $11.8 million. [28] SVCF provided its second-largest criminal justice reform grant to the Measures for Justice Initiative in the amount of $7.9 million. [29] Measures for Justice is an organization which compiles criminal justice data provides a database for citizens to serve as watchdogs over local enforcement. [30] SVCF also gave $5.8 million to the left-of-center American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) Foundation of Northern California. [31]

The SVCF has given several grants specifically focused on anti-prison advocacy, including $1.6 million to the Families Against Mandatory Minimums Foundation and $1.8 million to the Civil Rights Corps. [32] In 2017, SVCF additionally funded the left-of-center Drug Policy Alliance with a $1.4 million grant. [33] Outside of funding specific policy initiatives, SVCF provided grant funding to a number of left-of-center criminal justice think tanks in 2017. These include the Brennan Center for Justice ($225,000), the Vera Institute of Justice ($875,000), and the controversial Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) ($712,603). [34]

In 2017, SVCF also offered several grants to left-of-center immigration organizations, specifically those focused on legal advocacy for illegal immigrants. These include grants made to the American Immigration Council ($1.5 million), the Immigrant Legal Resource Center ($1.7 million), and the National Immigration Law Center ($524,825). [35]

Environmentalism

In 2017, SVCF made increased grants to environmentalist organizations, including providing $2.2 million to the left-of-center Environmental Defense Fund (EDF). [36] SVCF gave further grant funding to other left-of-center environmentalist groups, including the Natural Resources Defense Council ($164,615), the Sierra Club Foundation ($1.1 million), the Greenpeace Fund ($13,250), and the Conservation International Foundation ($1 million). [37]

 

Alongside environmentalist organizations, the SVCF offered substantial grants to left-of-center animal advocacy and animal liberation organizations. SVCF disbursed the largest of these grants to the Animal Legal Defense Fund (ALDF) in the amount of $681,500. [38] The ALDF is best known for its national fight to give animals legal standing in courts of law. [39] SVCF also provided grants to Animal Equality ($292,000) and the Wildlife Conservation Network ($564,100). [40]

Abortion

SVCF provided numerous grants to organizations supporting the expansion of access to abortion across the United States. In 2017 alone, SVCF provided over $2.5 million in funding to the Planned Parenthood Federation of America and affiliated local Planned Parenthood Organizations. [41] SVCF also provided grants to organizations advocating for the legal expansion of abortion services, including $89,450 to the NARAL Pro-Choice America Foundation and $1.3 million to the Center for Reproductive Rights. [42] SVCF also supported the National Network of Abortion Funds, an organization which directly funds abortions for individual women who cannot afford them, with a grant of over $1 million. [43]

Left-of-Center Think-Tanks and Media

SVCF supports various left-of-center governance think-tanks and media organizations with grant funding. In 2017, SVCF gave $662,000 to Common Sense Media and $22,000 to Democracy Now Productions. [44] SVCF also gave $727,461 to the left-of-center Center for American Progress, a group advocating for liberal social and economic policies. [45] [46] In 2017, SVCF gave a $1.3 million grant to the Center for Popular Democracy, a left-of-center voter mobilization and policy initiative. [47] [48]

Criticism and Proposed Regulations

In July 2019, former SVCF key fundraiser Chuck Brown came out in opposition to SVCF and DAFs more generally for placing growth over philanthropic endeavors, echoing the common criticism of the organization as a cleverly designed tax loophole rather than a genuine philanthropic endeavor. [49] Brown claimed that in SVCF’s goal of raising $1 billion per year, conversations with those opening DAFs centered on tax breaks, rather than charitable projects the donors desired to pursue. [50] The statement came on the heels of a lawsuit against Fidelity Charitable which aimed to increase the transparency of DAFs. [51] As of 2019, the SVCF reported that 100 of its more than 1200 DAF accounts had not made a single charitable grant in four years. [52]

In January 2020, the California state legislature advanced Assembly Bill 1712 through committee, which would require greater financial disclosure from DAF accounts. [53] The bill, if passed, would require that DAFs disclose the details of how often accounts sit on donated funds without actually disbursing the funding to charity, which would provide hard evidence for the often-volleyed criticism of DAFs being used as indefinite tax havens disguised as philanthropic endeavors. [54] Proponents of DAF regulation argue in favor of establishing a five percent minimum payout from all accounts. [55]

SVCF came out in opposition to the California proposal, while the nonprofit advocacy group CalNonprofits stated its support. [56] [57] As of early 2020, the bill was awaiting an Assembly floor vote. [58]

Labor and Sexual Harassment Scandal

In April 2018, the Chronicle of Philanthropy published a scathing report which detailed allegations of abusive behavior and sexual harassment against Mari Ellen Loijens, the former top fundraiser at the foundation with a decorated past in finance. [59] The Chronicle interviewed 19 of Loijens’s former employees, many of which claimed that Loijens created a toxic work environment, which included screaming at employees, making lewd comments in the workplace, and attempting to kiss a subordinate. [60]

Several employees accused Loijens of sexually inappropriate behavior in the workplace, alleging that Loijens routinely commented on people’s appearances, made advances on subordinate staff, and so frequently made inappropriate comments that her subordinates developed a code word to say to her out loud each time she crossed a line. [61]

Rebecca Dupras, a former vice president for development at SVCF, told The Chronicle that Loijens’s abusive behavior was well-known among executives at the foundation, claiming that then-CEO Emmett Carson routinely shut down complaints of her behavior, even from fellow executives. [62] The Chronicle further alleged that Loijens’s behavior created high turnover within the company, having four vice presidents for development and three vice presidents for corporate responsibility who reported to Loijens in just five years. [63]

The Chronicle presented the allegations to Emmett Carson, the then-CEO of SVCF, prompting an internal investigation by SVCF into the allegations, led by independent investigators from Thompson Hine law firm. [64] Just one day after The Chronicle published the allegations, Loijens resigned from her position. [65]

Soon after Loijens resigned, allegations began against Carson, who was accused of sheltering her and enabling abusive behavior in order to maintain her stellar fundraising record and grow the foundation. [66] Former employee Maria Moreno publicly stated on Twitter that she had filed complaints against both Carson and Loijens, but that she was eventually forced out herself due to the “toxic work environment” at SVCF. [67]

One week later, Carson was placed on paid leave, and SVCF hired the Boies Schiller Flexner law firm to investigate the claims. [68] After interviewing 82 people, the firm found that “many allegations from current and former employees were substantiated.” [69] The firm further reported that Loijens and Carson contributed to a “workplace culture issues at SVCF, including a fear of speaking out or reporting workplace issues…as well as distrust of HR leadership.” [70] The report further found that inappropriate behavior “was often inadequately addressed or overlooked,” and that racial, sexual, and otherwise inappropriate comments were “‘normalized’ within certain divisions” of SVCF. [71] Carson left SVCF following the release of the report. [72] Altogether, the scandal cost SVCF more than $1.4 million between hiring investigators and fulfilling severance packages. [73]

In April 2019, the Lucas Museum of Narrative Art hired Carson to serve as its new CEO. [74] In response, 23 former SVCF employees sent an open letter to the Lucas Museum board, requesting that the board reconsider the hiring and remove Carson from the position. [75]

People and Funding

As of 2018, SVCF had more than $13.5 billion in assets, making it the largest community foundation in the United States. [76] In spite of its purpose as a grantmaking organization, SVCF disbursed just $1.8 billion in grants in 2017, just over 14 percent of its total assets. [77] That same year, SVCF assets increased from just $5.3 billion to $13.5 billion, surpassing the assets of the Ford Foundation. [78] Though SVCF is not required to publicly disclose specific asset sources, the increase likely came from the appreciation of SVCF investments, which include potentially 36 million Facebook shares, donated by founder Mark Zuckerberg. [79]

As of May 2018, at least 17 billionaires had donated to SVCF, including high-profile, left-of-center donors. [80] Most donors placed shares of stock into donor-advised funds, allowing the donors to benefit from upfront tax benefits and the power to advise the disbursement of their donations. [81] Facebook founder Mark Zuckerberg gave the largest donation to SVCF, amounting to $1.75 billion in Facebook stock in 2010. [82] In 2018, he gave an additional donation of $200 million. [83] Most of the other billionaire donors are Silicon Valley CEOs or founders of companies, including WhatsApp cofounder Brian Acton, Twitter founder and CEO Jack Dorsey, and notable left-of-center donor and Netflix co-founder Reed Hastings. [84] Howard Schultz, the Starbucks chairman who explored a presidential campaign as an independent in 2019, also gave to the foundation. [85]

Nichole Taylor works as CEO of SVCF, having taken office in December 2018. [86] Taylor previously served as vice president of the Arizona State University Foundation, and in her role, she was responsible for overseeing estate and gift planning, annual giving, and foundation relations. [87]

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  75. Giwargis, Ramona. “Ex-Silicon Valley Community Foundation Employees Appeal to George

    Lucas over Emmett Carson Hiring.” San José Spotlight, January 18, 2020. https://sanjosespotlight.com/ex-silicon-valley-community-foundation-employees-appeal-to-george-lucas-over-emmett-carson-hiring/. ^

  76. Chaykowski, Kathleen. “Zuckerberg Donates $200 Million To Silicon Valley Community

    Foundation As It Hires New CEO.” Forbes. Forbes Magazine, November 10, 2018. https://www.forbes.com/sites/kathleenchaykowski/2018/11/10/zuckerberg-donates-214-million-to-silicon-valley-community-foundation-as-it-hires-new-ceo/#d2e5720550d9. ^

  77. Silicon Valley Community Foundation.” Return of Organization Exempt from Income Tax, Form 990. Schedule I, Part II. ^
  78. Pender, Kathleen. “Silicon Valley Community Foundation’s Assets Surged in 2017. It Won’t Say Why.” SFChronicle.com. San Francisco Chronicle, February 24, 2018. https://www.sfchronicle.com/business/networth/article/Silicon-Valley-Community-Foundation-s-assets-12704936.php. ^
  79. Pender, Kathleen. “Silicon Valley Community Foundation’s Assets Surged in 2017. It Won’t Say Why.” SFChronicle.com. San Francisco Chronicle, February 24, 2018. https://www.sfchronicle.com/business/networth/article/Silicon-Valley-Community-Foundation-s-assets-12704936.php. ^
  80. Dolan, Kerry A. “Here Are 17 Billionaires Who’ve Donated To The Silicon Valley Community Foundation.” Forbes. Forbes Magazine, September 26, 2018. https://www.forbes.com/sites/kerryadolan/2018/05/02/here-are-16-billionaires-whove-donated-to-the-silicon-valley-community-foundation/#71bd06a01bfb. ^
  81. Dolan, Kerry A. “Here Are 17 Billionaires Who’ve Donated To The Silicon Valley Community Foundation.” Forbes. Forbes Magazine, September 26, 2018. https://www.forbes.com/sites/kerryadolan/2018/05/02/here-are-16-billionaires-whove-donated-to-the-silicon-valley-community-foundation/#71bd06a01bfb. ^
  82. Dolan, Kerry A. “Here Are 17 Billionaires Who’ve Donated To The Silicon Valley Community Foundation.” Forbes. Forbes Magazine, September 26, 2018. https://www.forbes.com/sites/kerryadolan/2018/05/02/here-are-16-billionaires-whove-donated-to-the-silicon-valley-community-foundation/#71bd06a01bfb. ^
  83. Chaykowski, Kathleen. “Zuckerberg Donates $200 Million To Silicon Valley Community Foundation As It Hires New CEO.” Forbes. Forbes Magazine, November 10, 2018. https://www.forbes.com/sites/kathleenchaykowski/2018/11/10/zuckerberg-donates-214-million-to-silicon-valley-community-foundation-as-it-hires-new-ceo/#d2e5720550d9. ^
  84. [1] Dolan, Kerry A. “Here Are 17 Billionaires Who’ve Donated To The Silicon Valley Community Foundation.” Forbes. Forbes Magazine, September 26, 2018. https://www.forbes.com/sites/kerryadolan/2018/05/02/here-are-16-billionaires-whove-donated-to-the-silicon-valley-community-foundation/#71bd06a01bfb. ^
  85. Dolan, Kerry A. “Here Are 17 Billionaires Who’ve Donated To The Silicon Valley Community Foundation.” Forbes. Forbes Magazine, September 26, 2018. https://www.forbes.com/sites/kerryadolan/2018/05/02/here-are-16-billionaires-whove-donated-to-the-silicon-valley-community-foundation/#71bd06a01bfb. ^
  86. Chaykowski, Kathleen. “Zuckerberg Donates $200 Million To Silicon Valley Community Foundation As It Hires New CEO.” Forbes. Forbes Magazine, November 10, 2018. https://www.forbes.com/sites/kathleenchaykowski/2018/11/10/zuckerberg-donates-214-million-to-silicon-valley-community-foundation-as-it-hires-new-ceo/#d2e5720550d9. ^
  87. Chaykowski, Kathleen. “Zuckerberg Donates $200 Million To Silicon Valley Community Foundation As It Hires New CEO.” Forbes. Forbes Magazine, November 10, 2018. https://www.forbes.com/sites/kathleenchaykowski/2018/11/10/zuckerberg-donates-214-million-to-silicon-valley-community-foundation-as-it-hires-new-ceo/#d2e5720550d9. ^

Directors, Employees & Supporters

  1. Misti Sangani
    Chief Donor Engagement Officer
  2. Emmett Carson
    Former Chief Executive Officer
  3. Sarah Valencia
    Vice President of Finance
  4. Bert Feuss
    Senior Vice President of Investments
  5. Paul Velaski
    Chief Financial Officer
  6. Mari Ellen Loijens
    Former Chief Business Officer

Donation Recipients

  1. ACLU Foundation of Northern California (Non-profit)
  2. Alliance for Global Justice (AFGJ) (Non-profit)
  3. American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) Foundation (Non-profit)
  4. American Documentary (Non-profit)
  5. American Immigration Council (AIC) (Non-profit)
  6. American Jewish World Service (Non-profit)
  7. America’s Voice Education Fund (Non-profit)
  8. Animal Legal Defense Fund (Non-profit)
  9. Animal Welfare Institute (Non-profit)
  10. Anti-Defamation League (ADL) (Non-profit)
  11. Ashoka (Non-profit)
  12. Asian Americans Advancing Justice – Los Angeles (Non-profit)
  13. Aspen Institute (Non-profit)
  14. Astraea Lesbian Foundation for Justice (Non-profit)
  15. Aubin Pictures (Non-profit)
  16. Bill, Hillary, and Chelsea Clinton Foundation (Non-profit)
  17. Brady Center to Prevent Gun Violence (Non-profit)
  18. Catholic Legal Immigration Network (CLINIC) (Non-profit)
  19. Citizen Engagement Lab (CEL) Education Fund (Non-profit)
  20. Center for a New American Security (Non-profit)
  21. Center for American Progress (CAP) (Non-profit)
  22. Center for Democracy and Technology (CDT) (Non-profit)
  23. Center for Investigative Reporting (Non-profit)
  24. Center for Popular Democracy (CPD) (Non-profit)
  25. Center For Reproductive Rights (Non-profit)
  26. Center for Strategic and International Studies (Non-profit)
  27. Center for the Study of Social Policy (Non-profit)
  28. Center on Budget and Policy Priorities (CBPP) (Non-profit)
  29. Chicken & Egg Pictures (Non-profit)
  30. Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington (CREW) (Non-profit)
  31. City Year (Non-profit)
  32. Colorofchange.org Education Fund (Non-profit)
  33. Common Sense Media (Non-profit)
  34. Community Initiatives (Non-profit)
  35. Compassion Over Killing (Non-profit)
  36. Conservation International (Non-profit)
  37. Council on American Islamic Relations (CAIR) (Non-profit)
  38. Council on Foreign Relations (Non-profit)
  39. Doctors Without Borders (Non-profit)
  40. Drug Policy Alliance (Non-profit)
  41. Earth Island Institute (Non-profit)
  42. EarthRights International (ERI) (Non-profit)
  43. East Bay Community Foundation (Non-profit)
  44. Electronic Frontier Foundation (Non-profit)
  45. Electronic Privacy Information Center (Non-profit)
  46. Environmental Defense Fund (EDF) (Non-profit)
  47. Environmental Working Group (EWG) (Non-profit)
  48. Equal Justice Initiative (Non-profit)
  49. Everytown for Gun Safety Support Fund (Non-profit)
  50. Fidelity Investments Charitable Gift Fund (Non-profit)
  51. Food and Water Watch (FWW) (Non-profit)
  52. Foundation for National Progress (Non-profit)
  53. Freedom for Immigrants (Non-profit)
  54. Freedom From Religion Foundation (Non-profit)
  55. Friends of the Earth (Non-profit)
  56. FSG (Non-profit)
  57. FWD.us (Non-profit)
  58. Girls Who Code (Non-profit)
  59. Golden State Opportunity Foundation (Non-profit)
  60. Goldman Sachs Philanthropy Fund (Non-profit)
  61. Good Ventures (Non-profit)
  62. Government Accountability Project (GAP) (Non-profit)
  63. Grantmakers Concerned with Immigrants and Refugees (GCIR) (Non-profit)
  64. Grist Magazine (Non-profit)
  65. Health Care Without Harm (Non-profit)
  66. Hispanic Federation (Non-profit)
  67. Hope Enterprise Corporation (Non-profit)
  68. Hopewell Fund (Non-profit)
  69. Human Rights Campaign Foundation (Non-profit)
  70. Human Rights Watch (Non-profit)
  71. Humane Society International (Non-profit)
  72. Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) (Non-profit)
  73. Immigrant Legal Resource Center (ILRC) (Non-profit)
  74. International Rescue Committee (Non-profit)
  75. Institute for Nonprofit News (Non-profit)
  76. Jane’s Due Process (Non-profit)
  77. Just Vision (Non-profit)
  78. JustLeadershipUSA (Non-profit)
  79. LatinoJustice PRLDEF (Non-profit)
  80. Leadership for Educational Equity Foundation (Non-profit)
  81. MapLight (Non-profit)
  82. Media Matters for America (Non-profit)
  83. Mercy For Animals (Non-profit)
  84. Migration Policy Institute (Non-profit)
  85. Mississippi Center for Justice (Non-profit)
  86. Mother Jones (Non-profit)
  87. Movement Strategy Center (Non-profit)
  88. Muslim Advocates (Non-profit)
  89. National Academy of Sciences (NAS) (Non-profit)
  90. National Audubon Society (Non-profit)
  91. National Committee for Responsive Philanthropy (Non-profit)
  92. National Day Laborer Organizing Network (Non-profit)
  93. National Domestic Workers Alliance (NDWA) (Non-profit)
  94. National Immigration Law Center (Non-profit)
  95. National Network of Abortion Funds (Non-profit)
  96. National Public Radio (NPR) (Non-profit)
  97. Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) (Non-profit)
  98. The Nature Conservancy (TNC) (Non-profit)
  99. NEO Philanthropy (Non-profit)
  100. New America (New America Foundation) (Non-profit)
  101. New Venture Fund (NVF) (Non-profit)
  102. New Virginia Majority Education Fund (Non-profit)
  103. Niskanen Center (Non-profit)
  104. Nuclear Threat Initiative (NTI) (Non-profit)
  105. Obama Foundation (Non-profit)
  106. Opportunity Institute (Non-profit)
  107. Out & Equal (Non-profit)
  108. Oxfam America (Non-profit)
  109. Faith In Action (Non-profit)
  110. Partnership for Public Service (Non-profit)
  111. PBS Foundation (Non-profit)
  112. People’s Action Institute (Non-profit)
  113. Pew Charitable Trusts (Non-profit)
  114. Planned Parenthood Federation of America (PPFA) (Non-profit)
  115. Planned Parenthood Mar Monte (Non-profit)
  116. PolicyLink (Non-profit)
  117. Pollination Project (Non-profit)
  118. Population Services International (PSI) (Non-profit)
  119. Post Carbon Institute (aka Metafoundation) (Non-profit)
  120. ProPublica (Non-profit)
  121. Prosperity Now (formerly Corporation for Enterprise Development) (Non-profit)
  122. Protect Democracy Project (PDP) (Non-profit)
  123. Provide (Non-profit)
  124. Public Knowledge (Non-profit)
  125. Public Policy Institute of California (Non-profit)
  126. Robin Hood Foundation (Non-profit)
  127. Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors (Non-profit)
  128. Scholars Strategy Network (Non-profit)
  129. Science Philanthropy Alliance (Non-profit)
  130. Sierra Club Foundation (Non-profit)
  131. Smart Growth America (Non-profit)
  132. Social and Environmental Entrepreneurs (Non-profit)
  133. Solutions Journalism Network (Non-profit)
  134. Southern Poverty Law Center (SPLC) (Non-profit)
  135. Stand Up Republic Foundation (Stand Up Ideas) (Non-profit)
  136. State Innovation Exchange (SIX) (Non-profit)
  137. Sundance Institute (Non-profit)
  138. Teach for America (Non-profit)
  139. Texas Organizing Project Education Fund (Non-profit)
  140. The GroundTruth Project (Non-profit)
  141. The New Teacher Project (TNTP) (Non-profit)
  142. The Praxis Project (Non-profit)
  143. Tides Center (Non-profit)
  144. Tides Foundation (Non-profit)
  145. Trust for Conservation Innovation (For-profit)
  146. UnidosUS (formerly National Council of La Raza) (Non-profit)
  147. United Nations Foundation (Non-profit)
  148. United We Dream (Non-profit)
  149. Urban Institute (Non-profit)
  150. V-Day (Non-profit)
  151. Vanguard Charitable Endowment Program (Non-profit)
  152. Vera Institute of Justice (VIJ) (Non-profit)
  153. Voto Latino (Non-profit)
  154. William J. Brennan Center for Justice (Non-profit)
  155. Windward Fund (Non-profit)
  156. Working Partnerships USA (Non-profit)
  See an error? Let us know!

Nonprofit Information

  • Accounting Period: December - November
  • Tax Exemption Received: October 1, 2006

  • Available Filings

    Period Form Type Total revenue Total functional expenses Total assets (EOY) Total liabilities (EOY) Unrelated business income? Total contributions Program service revenue Investment income Comp. of current officers, directors, etc. Form 990
    2017 Dec Form 990 $2,418,011,459 $1,895,238,973 $12,563,909,962 $862,558,052 Y $1,462,509,631 $3,068,812 $92,768,084 $2,242,916 PDF
    2016 Dec Form 990 $1,905,632,252 $1,351,468,832 $7,240,507,464 $776,887,048 Y $1,256,247,013 $3,398,051 $61,818,970 $2,027,650 PDF
    2015 Dec Form 990 $1,555,405,527 $718,336,243 $6,304,272,612 $229,473,387 Y $1,030,271,539 $5,295,504 $42,065,979 $1,915,077 PDF
    2014 Dec Form 990 $2,326,669,188 $911,750,423 $5,661,647,798 $200,961,438 Y $1,877,215,083 $3,003,018 $24,714,268 $2,057,428 PDF
    2013 Dec Form 990 $1,473,967,051 $345,335,889 $3,931,040,119 $205,178,791 Y $1,293,332,835 $2,199,836 $19,836,906 $1,652,495 PDF
    2012 Dec Form 990 $997,817,676 $308,431,383 $2,193,211,675 $211,365,347 Y $946,087,500 $2,379,150 $19,931,903 $1,518,976 PDF
    2011 Dec Form 990 $450,216,689 $333,666,240 $1,449,348,496 $195,867,431 Y $391,324,953 $2,494,613 $20,037,567 $2,578,070 PDF

    Additional Filings (PDFs)

    Silicon Valley Community Foundation

    2440 WEST EL CAMINO REAL
    MOUNTAIN VIEW, CA 94040-1497