Non-profit

Center for Strategic and International Studies

Website:

www.csis.org/

Location:

WASHINGTON, DC

Tax ID:

52-1501082

Tax-Exempt Status:

501(c)(3)

Budget (2020):

Revenue: $47,244,158
Expenses: $44,146,650
Assets: $194,805,127

Type:

Think Tank

Founded:

1987

President:

John J. Hamre

The Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS) is an American think tank and research institution created to support American foreign policy and national security during the height of the Cold War. [1]

The organization receives most of its revenue from grants and contributions by organizations, corporations, and private grantmaking foundations including the Smith Richardson Foundation, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Charles Koch Foundation, World Wildlife Fund, Bank of America Corporation, Northrop Grumman Corporation, BP, Citigroup, Facebook, Johnson & Johnson, Microsoft, Raytheon Company, Amazon, Apple, IBM, and Disney. [2] [3]

Background

The Center for Strategic and International Studies is an American think tank based in Washington, D.C. The organization, created as part of Georgetown University, was founded by Admiral Arleigh Burke and David Abshire in 1962. Burke and Abshire founded CSIS to find solutions to the problems with American foreign policy and national security during the height of the Cold War. The organization continues to focus on national security and foreign policy issues but has broadened its research to other issues including environmentalism, cybersecurity, and global health. [4] [5]

CSIS became an independent nonprofit organization in 1987, and currently employs more than 240 staff. CSIS notes on its website that it hires scholars and former “government and private-sector officials” who conduct research and develop “policy prescriptions.” CSIS also notes that members of staff work with stakeholders “inside and outside the government.” [6] [7]

CSIS states that it is regularly “called upon by Congress, the executive branch,” and the media. CSIS states that testifying is a “key element” in its engagement with Congress, noting that in 2020 16 “experts” from the organization participated in 18 House and Senate hearings. It also provides Congress with analysis on current issues, reports with policy recommendations, and staff-focused policy discussions. [8]

Financials

The Center for Strategic and International Studies receives most of its income from grants and contributions from private organizations and grantmaking foundations. In 2018, CSIS received a total of just under $83.3 million in revenue, $77 million of which came from contributions and grants, and $7 million from program services. The organization had a total expense amount of just under $45 million, $17 million of which was used to pay for salaries and wages while another $3.3 million was used to pay for executive compensation. Revenue dropped significantly in 2017 when the organization received $50.6 million in total revenue and had just over $46 million in total expenses. [9]

CSIS had a total revenue of approximately $45.5 million in both 2018 and 2019 and received around $40 million in contributions and grants for both years. The organization received just under $3 million in government grants in 2018 and just over $2 million in 2019. [10] [11]

Its total expenses were also similar for both years, reaching around $45 million. Despite a total revenue substantially less than it had in 2016, CSIS spent approximately $18 million on salaries and wages in 2018 and 2019. It also spent $4.6 million in executive compensation in 2018, and approximately $5.1 million in 2019. [12]

Funding

The Center for Strategic and International Studies receives most of its contributions and grants from private grantmaking foundations including the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Open Society Foundations, and the Rockefeller Brothers Fund.

The Gates Foundation is one of the biggest funders of CSIS. It has contributed approximately $42 million in grants from 2001 to 2020. Most of the grants the Gates Foundation made were listed under the topics of global health, and agricultural development. [13]

The William and Flora Hewlett Foundation (also known as the Hewlett Foundation) is a left-of-center private grantmaking foundation that provides a substantial amount of money to CSIS. In total, the Hewlett Foundation has contributed $5,081,200 in grants from 2000 to 2021. [14]

The Carnegie Corporation of New York is a left-of-center grantmaking foundation founded by Andrew Carnegie in 1911. It is a substantial funder of CSIS and has provided grants to the organization since 2005. The Carnegie Corporation of New York has granted approximately $13.5 million to CSIS as of June 2022. [15]

The Henry Luce Foundation, a left-of-center grantmaking organization, has provided CSIS 24 grants from 1989 to 2022. The grants amount to a total of $4,067,500 and are mostly aimed at improving foreign relations and international affairs. [16]

The Alfred P. Sloan Foundation is an American philanthropic family foundation founded in 1934 by Alfred P. Sloan, former president and CEO of General Motors. The Sloan Foundation today serves as a grantmaking organization that funds projects in science, economics, and technology. The foundation has provided CSIS with five grants, totaling $793,400, from 2016 to 2020. [17]

The Open Society Foundations (OSF) is a private grant making foundation created and funded by billionaire financier and liberal philanthropist George Soros. OSF has provided CSIS with seven grants between 2017 and 2020. The grants amount to a total of $570,178, primarily to support foreign policy initiatives. [18]

The ClimateWorks Foundation is a left-of-center “pass-through” funding entity that distributes funds from donors to environmentalist advocacy groups around the world. Many of these nonprofits lobby for emissions taxes, restricting coal use, international climate treaties with strict enforcement mechanisms, and diminishing the use of cars. It provided two grants to CSIS, both under its “transportation” program. One grant of $160,000 was awarded in April 2019, and another grant of $150,000 in May 2020. [19][20]

The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF) was a key funder of groups advocating for the enactment of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare. RWJF provided funds to Enroll America, an organization that the Obama administration used to recruit sign-ups for Obamacare health plans. [21]

RWJF made a single grant of $244,049 to CSIS in 2020 under the title “Promoting policies to address vaccine hesitancy.” According to the grant description, CSIS would create a year-long forum on “Improving Vaccine Confidence and Addressing Social Media Misinformation Campaigns.” [22]

The Rockefeller Brothers Fund is a left-of-center grant making foundation created in 1940 as the charity for the five sons of John D. Rockefeller, Jr.:  John D., III; future U.S. Vice President Nelson; Laurance; Winthrop; and David Rockefeller. The fund has provided two grants to CSIS both of which focused on work surrounding the Western Balkans. One grant of $100,000 was awarded in June 2017, and the other was for $120,000 in August 2019. [23]

On its website, the Center for Strategic and International Studies notes donors that contributed $5,000 or more during the 2020 fiscal year. These donors include the Smith Richardson Foundation, Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Charles Koch Foundation, Oceans 5, ClearPath, Freedom House, Bloomberg Philanthropies, World Wildlife Fund, Bank of America Corporation, Northrop Grumman Corporation, BP, Citigroup, Facebook, General Atomics, Johnson & Johnson, Microsoft, Raytheon Company, Amazon, Apple, IBM, and Disney. [24] [25]

People

John J. Hamre

John J. Hamre is the president of the Center for Strategic and International Studies. Before accepting his position as president of the organization in 2000, Hamre was the 26th United States deputy secretary of defense and undersecretary of defense in the Clinton administration, a staff member of the Senate Armed Services Committee, and the deputy assistant director for national security and international affairs in the Congressional Budget Office. He was also made chairman of the Defense Policy Board by Secretary of Defense Robert Gates in 2007. [26]

Board of Trustees

Many people affiliated with corporations, foundations, and the United States government sit on the board of trustees for CSIS.

Members of the board of trustees include: [27]

  • Thomas J. Pritzker, chairman and CEO of the Pritzker Organization;
  • Paul Ryan, former Speaker of the U.S. House of Representatives and former Republican U.S. Representative from Wisconsin;
  • William K. Reilly, chairman emeritus, World Wildlife Fund;
  • Brendan Bechtel, chairman and CEO, Bechtel Group;
  • Othman Benjelloun, president and CEO, BMCE Bank;
  • William S. Cohen, chairman and CEO, the Cohen Group;
  • William Daley, vice chairman of public affairs, Wells Fargo and Company;
  • William E. Ford, chairman and CEO, General Atlantic;
  • Henrietta Fore, former executive director, UNICEF;
  • Mellody Hobson, Co-CEO and President, Ariel Investments;
  • Henry A. Kissinger, former National Security Advisor; and
  • Kewsong Lee, CEO of the Carlyle Group.

 

References

  1. “A Brief History.” Center for Strategic and International Studies. Accessed June 27, 2022. www.csis.org/programs/about-us/more-about-csis/brief-history. ^
  2. “Corporation and Trade Association Donors.” Center for Strategic and International Studies. Accessed June 27, 2022. www.csis.org/corporation-and-trade-association-donors. ^
  3. “Foundation, Nongovernmental Organization, and Nonprofit Donors.” Center for Strategic and International Studies. Accessed June 27, 2022. www.csis.org/foundation-nongovernmental-organization-and-nonprofit-donors. ^
  4. “A Brief History.” Center for Strategic and International Studies. Accessed June 27, 2022. www.csis.org/programs/about-us/more-about-csis/brief-history. ^
  5. “Topics.” Center for Strategic and International Studies. Accessed June 27, 2022. www.csis.org/topics.7 ^
  6. “A Brief History.” Center for Strategic and International Studies. Accessed June 27, 2022. www.csis.org/programs/about-us/more-about-csis/brief-history. ^
  7. “Ethics and Accountability At CSIS.” Center for Strategic and International Studies. Accessed June 27, 2022. www.csis.org/programs/about-us/more-about-csis/ethics-and-accountability-csis. ^
  8. McCabe, Riley. “Congressional Affairs at CSIS.” Center for Strategic and International Studies. March 15, 2022. Accessed June 27, 2022. www.csis.org/programs/about-us/congressional-affairs-csis. ^
  9. Center for Strategic and International Studies. Return of an Organization Exempt From Income Tax (Form 990). 2018. ^
  10. Center for Strategic and International Studies. Return of an Organization Exempt From Income Tax (Form 990). 2018. ^
  11. Center for Strategic and International Studies. Return of an Organization Exempt From Income Tax (Form 990). 2018. ^
  12. Center for Strategic and International Studies. Return of an Organization Exempt From Income Tax (Form 990). 2018. ^
  13. “Grant Database – Center for Strategic and International Studies.” Gates Foundation. Accessed June 27, 2022. https://www.gatesfoundation.org/about/committed-grants?q=Center%20for%20Strategic%20%26%20International%20Studies,%20Inc.&state=District%20of%20Columbia. ^
  14. “Grant Database – Center for Strategic and International Studies.” William and Flora Hewlett Foundation. Accessed June 27, 2022. https://hewlett.org/grants/?keyword=center%20for%20strategic%20and%20international%20studies&sort=relevance¤t_page=1. ^
  15. “Center for Strategic and International Studies, Inc.” Carnegie Corporation of New York. Accessed June 27, 2022. www.carnegie.org/grants/grants-database/grantee/center-for-strategic-and-international-studies-inc/. ^
  16. “Grant Database – Center for Strategic and International Studies.” Henry Luce Foundation. Accessed June 27, 2022. https://www.hluce.org/grants/?sort=newest&date_day=&date_month=&date_year=&keyword=center%20for%20strategic%20and%20international%20studies. ^
  17. “Grants Database.” Alfred P. Sloan Foundation. Accessed June 27, 2022. sloan.org/grants-database. ^
  18. “Grant Database – Center for Strategic and International Studies.” Open Society Foundations. Accessed June 27, 2022. https://www.opensocietyfoundations.org/grants/past?filter_keyword=center+for+strategic+and+international+studies. ^
  19. Wooster, Martin Morse. “A Reaganite Entrepreneurs Flawed Philanthropy.” Capital Research Center. January 1, 2013. Accessed June 27, 2022. capitalresearch.org/article/a-reaganite-entrepreneurs-flawed-philanthropy/. ^
  20. “Grant Database – Center for Strategic and International Studies.” ClimateWorks Foundation. Accessed June 27, 2022. https://www.climateworks.org/grants-database/?sort_by=newest&search=center%20for%20strategic%20and%20international%20studies&posts_per_page=20. ^
  21. Horowitz, Daniel. “How the left and progressive foundations gave us ObamaCare—a law hated by so many.” Fox News. June 25, 2012. Accessed June 27, 2022. www.foxnews.com/opinion/how-the-left-and-progressive-foundations-gave-us-obamacare-a-law-hated-by-so-many. ^
  22.  “Grant Database – Center for Strategic and International Studies.” RWJF. Accessed June 27, 2022. https://www.rwjf.org/en/how-we-work/grants-explorer.html#k=center%20for%20strategic%20and%20international%20studies ^
  23. “Grant Database.” Rockefeller Brothers Fund. Accessed June 27, 2022. https://www.rbf.org/grants-search. ^
  24. “Corporation and Trade Association Donors.” Center for Strategic and International Studies. Accessed June 27, 2022. www.csis.org/corporation-and-trade-association-donors. ^
  25. “Foundation, Nongovernmental Organization, and Nonprofit Donors.” Center for Strategic and International Studies. Accessed June 27, 2022. www.csis.org/foundation-nongovernmental-organization-and-nonprofit-donors. ^
  26. “John J. Hamre.” Center for Strategic and International Studies. June 23, 2022. Accessed June 27, 2022. www.csis.org/people/john-j-hamre. ^
  27. “Board of Trustees.” Center for Strategic and International Studies. Accessed June 27, 2022. www.csis.org/programs/about-us/leadership-and-staff/board-trustees. ^

Directors, Employees & Supporters

  1. Wally Adeyemo
    Senior Adviser
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Nonprofit Information

  • Accounting Period: September - August
  • Tax Exemption Received: May 1, 1987

  • Available Filings

    Period Form Type Total revenue Total functional expenses Total assets (EOY) Total liabilities (EOY) Unrelated business income? Total contributions Program service revenue Investment income Comp. of current officers, directors, etc. Form 990
    2020 Sep Form 990 $47,244,158 $44,146,650 $194,805,127 $53,543,248 Y $42,008,268 $5,052,868 $1,356,742 $5,728,913
    2019 Sep Form 990 $45,529,366 $45,447,331 $183,161,990 $48,445,050 Y $38,945,126 $6,470,644 $466 $5,130,270 PDF
    2018 Sep Form 990 $45,436,285 $45,841,469 $182,214,715 $49,248,914 Y $40,290,620 $5,064,922 $4,308 $4,675,982 PDF
    2017 Sep Form 990 $50,601,140 $46,332,597 $189,042,614 $45,459,407 Y $45,793,209 $4,578,771 $9,746 $3,343,959 PDF
    2016 Sep Form 990 $84,229,241 $44,893,732 $185,589,824 $49,297,252 Y $77,076,016 $7,003,418 $9,652 $3,343,958
    2015 Sep Form 990 $43,431,720 $38,935,803 $152,393,286 $56,599,250 Y $34,796,901 $7,565,722 $820,952 $2,902,071 PDF
    2014 Sep Form 990 $41,287,509 $37,472,920 $152,752,779 $61,185,372 Y $32,802,653 $7,273,002 $826,350 $2,785,303 PDF
    2013 Sep Form 990 $37,160,761 $31,974,301 $154,140,883 $67,514,128 N $31,265,190 $4,422,450 $702,460 $2,312,944 PDF
    2012 Sep Form 990 $42,980,355 $33,012,273 $135,964,976 $56,179,730 N $33,677,029 $8,033,531 $673,675 $2,284,754 PDF
    2011 Sep Form 990 $58,337,624 $32,942,465 $125,563,606 $52,039,279 Y $48,135,945 $8,535,075 $1,314,807 $2,558,744 PDF

    Additional Filings (PDFs)

    Center for Strategic and International Studies

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