Non-profit

Oxfam America

The logo of the Oxford Committee For Famine Relief (OXFAM) as found on the website Oxfam America. (link)
Location:

BOSTON, MA

Tax ID:

23-7069110

DUNS Number:

38-760-2204

Tax-Exempt Status:

501(c)(3)

Budget (2017):

Revenue: $79,172,637
Expenses: $86,415,765
Assets: $81,998,618

Formation:

1970

Founders:

Cecil Jackson Cole (Oxfam Great Britain)

President:

Abby Maxman

Also see Oxfam America Advocacy Fund (Non-profit)

Oxfam America is the American nonprofit arm of the worldwide group Oxfam International, which advocates for expanded international aid programs worldwide. [1] Oxfam America’s programs focus on humanitarian aid, international development, and climate change. [2]

Oxfam America advocates for a left-of-center agenda [3] that cites inequality as a catchall justification to support left-leaning domestic taxation, [4] climate policies, [5] immigration policies, [6] and labor policies [7] among other things. Moreover, the group promotes the concept of “global citizenship” [8] which serves as a basis for its advocacy regarding federal spending on foreign aid, [9] international institutions that can override national policy, [10] and social justice trade deals which would sacrifice market demands for the reduction of global poverty, turning global trade into an economic redistribution program. [11]

Oxfam America boasts that it does not take U.S. Government grants, but other Oxfam organizations in its international network have received nearly $100 million in U.S. government grants from USAID. [12]

Oxfam America is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit associated with the 501(c)(4) social welfare organization Oxfam America Advocacy Fund.

Organizational Overview

In 1942, a group of Quaker intellectuals, social activists, and Oxford academics formed the Oxford Committee for Famine Relief in response to the plight of refugees in Greece. [13] As the situation in Europe improved, Oxfam’s attention shifted to address the needs of people in developing countries. [14]

Funded by loans from Oxfam Great Britain, a group of volunteers founded Oxfam America in 1970. [15] Originally located in Washington, D.C., Oxfam America relocated to Boston in 1973. [16]

Today Oxfam America has eight offices, with its headquarters in Boston, Massachusetts, its policy and campaigns office in Washington, D.C., and six foreign offices. [17]

Advocacy Agenda

Oxfam America’s social justice campaigns program is the group’s main U.S. advocacy operation through which it lobbies Congress and the executive branch; creates “action-oriented research”; organizes briefings, conferences, and speaker tours; issues reports; and conducts outreach to advocate for its policy preferences. [18]

Oxfam America’s current “values” statement emphasizes three liberal policy areas: “inequality,” “climate change,” and “threats to minorities, refugees, and immigrants.” [19]

In each of these issue areas, the group has advocated for extremely liberal policy prescriptions, leading one critic to write that Oxfam America is “a left-wing hack organization” and “should end the pretense of being a charity.” [20]

Heroes for Hope

In 1985, Marvel Comics published the comic book Heroes for Hope to raise money for East African famine relief, and initially intended to give the proceeds to Oxfam America. However, Oxfam America demanded to review the book before accepting the donation and eventually rejected the publication, saying the book “was unbelievably offensive” and that the people of Marvel Comics “were racist, sexist, and reprehensible,” according to former Marvel Comics senior editor Jim Shooter. [21]

A representative of Oxfam America visited Marvel Comics to urge the company not to publish the comic. While there, the representative bragged about how Oxfam American and other charitable groups were raising awareness about the famine in Africa. “This Oxfam America fellow, let’s call him Midas, just plain gushed about how good for business the East African famine was, how donations were rolling in at record levels. He talked about the millions dying as if it were a great marketing opportunity,” Shooter wrote. Marvel Comics eventually donated more than $500,000 to the Quaker-affiliated American Friends Service Committee from the proceeds of the comic book instead. [22]

Environmentalism

Oxfam America has taken left-wing environmentalist positions. Oxfam researchers has opposed the Keystone Pipeline, [23] coal [24] and oil-based energy generation, [25] and proclaimed that President Donald Trump’s decision to pull out of the Paris Agreement demonstrated “an unconscionable abstention of moral leadership.” [26]

Immigration Policy

Oxfam believes at least 75,000 refugees should be allowed into the United States per year [27] and called on the U.S. Supreme Court to strike down President Trump’s executive action limiting nationals of certain countries from entering the United States. [28] Similarly, Oxfam America called President Trump’s decision to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program, which granted legal status to certain classes of illegal immigrants by executive fiat, “morally obtuse.” [29] Oxfam also claimed that the U.S. was “deporting Central Americans back to their deaths,” advocating instead for an increase to the $750 billion Central America aid spending package in 2016. [30]

Economic Policy

Oxfam America argued that President Trump’s 2017 budget proposal, which included tax cuts, “abandon[ed] the poor for the sake of the wealthy.” [31] The group has also called for the implementation of a multi-billion dollar financial transaction tax worldwide [32] and the creation of a “global tax body” that would have the power to undercut national sovereignty over tax policy. [33] Oxfam has also advocated for progressive corporate tax rates “that contribute to the collective good.” [34]

Oxfam America argued that it is no longer true that hard work is enough to support a family, and has called for an increase in the federal minimum wage to $15 per hour, paid sick leave, expanding employer overtime compensation mandates, and an expansion of socialized worker handouts. [35] Oxfam has voiced criticisms of President Trump’s labor-related budget proposals [36] and opposed Andrew Puzder’s unsuccessful nomination for Secretary of Labor. [37]

Other Controversies

Credibility Issues

Oxfam America has often faced claims that their research and advocacy efforts are tenuous and unrepresentative of the truth.

In early 2017, Columnist Centre for Social Justice advisory board member Fraser Nelson wrote that Oxfam America uses statistical tricks to pitch a “punchy wealth inequality” narrative that suits their fundraising needs without mentioning the fact that “global inequality is narrowing, fast” due to capitalism. [38]

Similarly, Adam Smith Institute Fellow Tim Worstall argued that Oxfam America’s published reports about corporate tax dodging failed to account for the different tax statuses of corporations, skewing the data. [39]

Israel-Palestine Controversy

In 2014, Oxfam’s overseas organization came under fire when Jewish American actress Scarlett Johansson quit her role as an ambassador for the organization after it criticized her for endorsing SodaStream, a soda company located in Israel’s West Bank. [40]

The national committee of the pro-Palestine movement Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions (BDS) had urged Oxfam to end its relationship with Johansson [41] and Oxfam claimed that it was illegal for the business to operate in the Israeli settlement. [42]

After leaving Oxfam, Johansson alleged that the organization supported and funded a group tied to BDS, which the charity denies. She said:

“I think for a non-governmental organisation to be supporting something that’s a political cause… something feels not right about that to me. There’s plenty of evidence that Oxfam does support and has funded a BDS movement in the past. It’s something that can’t really be denied.” [43]

In December 2016, only after losing thousands of donors, Oxfam admitted that it had made a mistake in the dispute with Johansson. [44]

Attacks on President Trump

Oxfam America president Abby Maxman made her thoughts clear on President Trump, saying, “Mr. Trump continues on a path that will cost America its global influence and leadership.” [45] Oxfam began to oppose Trump’s actions the moment he assumed office. Oxfam submitted an amicus brief to the Supreme Court to fight Trump’s refugee travel ban [46] and as a related publicity stunt it rented out President Trump’s childhood home to house refugees in it as a form of protest. [47]

Additionally, the organization opposed Trump’s federal budget proposals that would cut federal funding. [48]

Globalist Agenda

Oxfam America opposes the “America First” message associated with the Trump movement and claims that any message of American prioritization is tantamount to “moral poverty” because it presents a “false choice” between being American or being “human.” [49] Oxfam America instead calls for “global citizenship” and works to “advance the cause of justice-driven internationalism” through its variety of programs. [50]

Under their banner of “global citizenship” Oxfam America supports an ardently globalist foreign policy agenda that in effect puts America’s priorities last. For instance, Oxfam America believes the U.S. government should pursue a philanthropic trade philosophy: it is only in support of free trade so long as the trade deals benefit countries at the lower end of the development ladder, arguing that “broad-based development [for other nations] should be a core objective of US trade policy.” [51] Consequently, the organization opposed the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) merely because the provisions in the deal would be too much of a boon for the American economy and did not include enough measures for the development of other countries. [52]

In order to bolster its argument that trade deals beneficial to the United States are bad and should thus be opposed, Oxfam America called attention to a previous trade deal with Colombia that resulted in a 300% windfall for America. [53]

Oxfam America supports international agreements that exert dominion over U.S. domestic law. In 2015, Oxfam America’s climate change policy manager penned an op-ed for Al Jazeera America expressing support for an international climate deal that “hopefully” would increase climate-related payments to poor countries and would mandate deep reduction in emissions. [54] Further, Oxfam America condemned President Trump for placing American energy production at a higher priority than combating climate change. [55] Similarly, in 2013, Oxfam America ran ads in support of an arms trade treaty, which the NRA adamantly opposed. [56]

Oxfam America fought against proposed cuts to U.S. aid spending [57] and have instead lobbied to increase federal aid for all foreign causes. [58] In 2017, Oxfam America advocated for industrialized nations, including America, to fully fund the United Nations’ request for an additional $6.3 billion in humanitarian funds for African nations. [59]

Lobbying

Oxfam America’s sister organization Oxfam America Advocacy Fund, a 501(c)(4), works together with Oxfam America, but has “fewer limitations on spending” [60] namely lobbying for legislative action related to Oxfam America’s goals. [61]

But Oxfam America’s 501(c)(3) arm does its fair share of lobbying: according to federal lobbing disclosures, it had spent over $7 million lobbying the federal government between 2005 and 2020. [62]

Some of the issues that it has lobbied for include:

  • In 2017, Oxfam America lobbied on multiple amendments to the FY 2018 federal budget, HR 3354. Included among the provisions Oxfam supported was more than $20 million in additional funding for foreign aid programs, and funding for Islamist organizations[63] that have been banned in some countries for providing funds to Hamas and other organizations with ties to terrorist activity. [64]
  • In 2008, Oxfam pushed for a passage of S. 3389,[65] which it claimed would help poor people to “fight the ‘curse’” of natural resources and reap cash from companies mining those resources across the world, which could then be spent on health care and other government social policies. [66]
  • In 2008, Oxfam America lobbied for S.2191, which sought to increase funding for international adaptation responses to global climate change. [67]

Finances

In 2016, Oxfam America spent over $86 million, and the organization’s end of year net assets stood at a massive $65 million. [68]

In 2005, Oxfam America admitted that up to 23 percent of its funding was used for non-program administrative costs including fundraising, which they admitted was a higher proportion than their peers. [69] In 2017, they spent 23% of their funds on non-program costs. [70]

Funding

Oxfam America claims to “rely almost entirely on funding from individual donors, foundations, and corporations.” [71]

Oxfam America has received grants from several wealthy liberal private foundations.

The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation has given over 40 grants to Oxfam America worth at least $10.6 million in total, including over $500,000 in 2017 alone. [72] [73] [74] [75]

The Rockefeller Foundation provided Oxfam America with a $500,000 grant for climate issues. [76] [77] Additionally, the Hewlett Foundation provided Oxfam America with over a million dollars, [78] the MacArthur Foundation gave Oxfam America $3,176,000 between 1978 and 2017, [79] and the David and Lucile Packard Foundation has provided five separate grants since 2015 for a total of $890,000. [80]

George Soros donated $273,585 to Oxfam America in 2013 to support the group’s climate agenda. [81]

Federal Funding

Oxfam America proclaims that it does not accept U.S. government grant money. [82] [83] However, a review of government spending records revealed that since 2008, Oxfam organizations have taken nearly $100 million in U.S. federal grants. [84] For example, in 2016, Oxfam GB received $7.7 million in U.S. federal grants, and in 2017 Oxfam received over $14 million in grants from U.S. Agency for International Development. [85] In 2019 Oxfam Intermon, a Spanish affiliate, received $2.4 million from USAID for work in the Central African Republic.[86]

Further, on Oxfam America’s 2016 annual report the organization indicates that it received 6.9 percent of its $79.4 million in revenue from “other Oxfam Affiliates,”[87]; similarly, according to the organization’s 2017 annual report, the group received 3.8 percent of it $83 million in revenues from other Oxfam organizations, [88] indicating that it is in fact possible for some of the U.S. grant money to have made its way back to Oxfam America from its foreign organizations.

In any case, it is of no surprise that, given the nearly $100 million in grants the Oxfam system has received from USAID, the organization responded sharply to President Trump’s push to significantly cut U.S. foreign aid. [89]

People

Abby Maxman is currently the president of Oxfam America and has been with Oxfam America since the start of 2017. [90] Prior to her work at Oxfam America, she served as deputy secretary general of CARE International in Geneva and has also worked with the U.S. Peace Corps, the U.S. EPA, and the U.S. Department of Agriculture. [91]

The board of directors consists of 20 members, four officers and 16 directors that oversee the direction of the organization and “work closely with staff in all areas of the agency.” [92] The board chair is Joe Loughrey, the former President and COO of Cummins Incorporated.  The three other officers listed include the vice chair Smita Singh, Abby Maxman (president of Oxfam America), and treasurer and secretary Joe H. Hamilton.

References

  1. “Our history: Oxfam America.” Undated. Accessed September 21, 2017. https://www.oxfamamerica.org/explore/about-oxfam/our-history/. ^
  2. Oxfam America, Return of Organization Exempt from Income Tax (Form 990), 2016, Part I. https://www.oxfamamerica.org/static/media/files/Oxfam-America-Federal-Form-990-2016.pdf ^
  3. “Our Values: Oxfam America” Oxfam America. Undated. Accessed September 22, 2017. https://www.oxfamamerica.org/explore/about-oxfam/our-values/. ^
  4. Sternthal, Michelle. “If the budget is a moral document, this one shows little but cruelty.” Oxfam America, The Politics of Poverty blog. June 01, 2017. Accessed October 03, 2017. https://politicsofpoverty.oxfamamerica.org/2017/05/if-the-budget-is-a-moral-document-this-one-shows-little-but-cruelty/ ^
  5. “Homeland Security Advisor Tom Bossert thinks we can address climate change, just.” Oxfam America, The Politics of Poverty blog. September 14, 2017. Accessed October 03, 2017. https://politicsofpoverty.oxfamamerica.org/2017/09/tom-bossert-address-climate-change-causes/. ^
  6. Gass, Vicky. “Dreams Deferred: The end of DACA.” Oxfam America, The Politics of Poverty blog. September 12, 2017. Accessed October 4, 2017. https://politicsofpoverty.oxfamamerica.org/2017/09/dreams-deferred-the-end-of-daca/ ^
  7. Cooper, David, Buchanan Jeffrey, Stanaland, Michael. “Few Rewards: An Agenda To Give America’s Working Poor A Raise.” Oxfam America. 2016. Accessed October, 3, 2016. https://www.oxfamamerica.org/static/media/files/Few_Rewards_Report_2016_web.pdf ^
  8. “Our Values: Oxfam America.” Oxfam America. Undated. Accessed September 22, 2017. https://www.oxfamamerica.org/explore/about-oxfam/our-values/. ^
  9. Schommer, Heather. “Oxfam’s international affairs budget voting guide: H.R. 3354.” The Politics of Poverty. September 07, 2017. Accessed October 02, 2017. https://politicsofpoverty.oxfamamerica.org/2017/09/oxfams-international-affairs-budget-voting-guide-h-r-3354/. ^
  10. Coleman, Heather. “OPINION: Paris talks come at an urgent moment for the planet.” Al Jazeera America. December 1, 2015. Accessed October 02, 2017. http://america.aljazeera.com/opinions/2015/12/paris-talks-come-at-an-urgent-moment-for-the-planet.html. ^
  11. “Fast Track and TPP Bad for Development.” Oxfam America. April 30, 2015. Accessed October 02, 2017. https://www.oxfamamerica.org/press/fast-track-and-tpp-bad-for-development/. ^
  12. “Total Funds Awarded As Prime And As Sub- FY2018.” USASpending.gov. 2017. Accessed October 02, 2017. https://www.usaspending.gov/Pages/TextView.aspx?data=RecipientFundingTrends&dunsnumber=226500650&fiscalyear=2017. ^
  13. “Our history: Oxfam America.” Undated. Accessed September 21, 2017. https://www.oxfamamerica.org/explore/about-oxfam/our-history/. ^
  14. “Our history: Oxfam America.” Undated. Accessed September 21, 2017. https://www.oxfamamerica.org/explore/about-oxfam/our-history/. ^
  15. “Our history: Oxfam America.” Undated. Accessed September 21, 2017. https://www.oxfamamerica.org/explore/about-oxfam/our-history/. ^
  16. “Our history: Oxfam America.” Undated. Accessed September 21, 2017. https://www.oxfamamerica.org/explore/about-oxfam/our-history/. ^
  17. “Contact us: Oxfam America.” Accessed September 21, 2017. https://www.oxfamamerica.org/explore/about-oxfam/contact-us/. ^
  18. “Resource rights: Oxfam America.” Oxfam America. Undated. Accessed October 02, 2017. https://policy-practice.oxfamamerica.org/work/resource-rights/. ^
  19. “Our Values: Oxfam America” Oxfam America. Undated. Accessed September 22, 2017. https://www.oxfamamerica.org/explore/about-oxfam/our-values/. ^
  20. Mitchell, Dan. “Oxfam: A Leftist Joke, Not A Real Charity.” Center for Freedom and Prosperity. January 19, 2017. Accessed October 03, 2017. http://freedomandprosperity.org/2017/blog/oxfam-a-leftist-joke-not-a-real-charity/. ^
  21. Shooter, Jim. “Heroes for Hope and Why I Don’t Like Oxfam America.” Jimshooter.com. September 13, 2011. Accessed October 18, 2017. ^
  22. Shooter, Jim. “Heroes for Hope and Why I Don’t Like Oxfam America.” Jimshooter.com. September 13, 2011. Accessed October 18, 2017. ^
  23. “Standing with Standing Rock.” Oxfam America, The Politics of Poverty Blog. November 01, 2016. Accessed October 02, 2017. https://politicsofpoverty.oxfamamerica.org/2016/11/standing-with-standing-rock/. ^
  24. “Coal isn’t the solution – and other energy access lessons from Peabody Energy’s demise.” Oxfam America, The Politics of Poverty. April 14, 2016. Accessed October 03, 2017. https://politicsofpoverty.oxfamamerica.org/2016/04/coal-isnt-the-solution-and-other-energy-access-lessons-from-peabody-energys-demise/. ^
  25. “Oxfam welcomes draft oil and mining sunshine rule.” Oxfam America. December 11, 2015. Accessed October 03, 2017. https://www.oxfamamerica.org/press/oxfam-welcomes-draft-oil-and-mining-sunshine-rule/. ^
  26. “Paris Agreement: We’re still in the fight.” Oxfam America, The Politics of Poverty blog. August 10, 2017. Accessed October 03, 2017. https://politicsofpoverty.oxfamamerica.org/2017/08/paris-agreement-were-still-in-the-fight/. ^
  27. “President Trump sets refugee admissions at lowest level in history of resettlement program.” Oxfam America. September 28, 2017. Accessed October 03, 2017. https://www.oxfamamerica.org/explore/stories/president-trump-plans-to-set-refugee-admissions-at-lowest-level-in-history-of-resettlement-program/. ^
  28. “Oxfam submits amicus brief to Supreme Court, continuing legal fight against travel ban.” Oxfam America. September 19, 2017. Accessed October 03, 2017. https://www.oxfamamerica.org/press/oxfam-submits-amicus-brief-to-supreme-court-joining-legal-fight-against-travel-ban/. ^
  29. Gass, Vicky. “Dreams Deferred: The end of DACA.” Oxfam America, The Politics of Poverty blog. September 12, 2017. Accessed October 4, 2017. https://politicsofpoverty.oxfamamerica.org/2017/09/dreams-deferred-the-end-of-daca/ ^
  30. Gass, Vicky. “Is the U.S. deporting Central Americans back to their deaths?” Oxfam America, The Politics of Poverty blog. January 8, 2016. Accessed October 3, 2017. https://politicsofpoverty.oxfamamerica.org/2016/01/is-the-u-s-deporting-central-americans-back-to-their-deaths/. ^
  31. Sternthal, Michelle. “If the budget is a moral document, this one shows little but cruelty.” Oxfam America, The Politics of Poverty blog. June 01, 2017. Accessed October 03, 2017. https://politicsofpoverty.oxfamamerica.org/2017/05/if-the-budget-is-a-moral-document-this-one-shows-little-but-cruelty/ ^
  32. “The Robin Hood Tax.” Oxfam America. Archived. March 6, 2013. Accessed October 2, 2017. https://web.archive.org/web/20130306104951/http://www.oxfam.org/en/campaigns/health-education/robin-hood-tax ^
  33. “Tax Battles: The dangerous global Race to the Bottom on Corporate Tax.” Oxfam America Policy Paper. December 12, 2016. Accessed October 3, 2017. https://www.oxfamamerica.org/static/media/files/bp-race-to-bottom-corporate-tax-121216-en.pdf ^
  34. “Tax Battles: The dangerous global Race to the Bottom on Corporate Tax.” Oxfam America Policy Paper. December 12, 2016. Accessed October 3, 2017. https://www.oxfamamerica.org/static/media/files/bp-race-to-bottom-corporate-tax-121216-en.pdf ^
  35. Cooper, David, Buchanan Jeffrey, Stanaland, Michael. “Few Rewards: An Agenda To Give America’s Working Poor A Raise.” Oxfam America. 2016. Accessed October, 3, 2016. https://www.oxfamamerica.org/static/media/files/Few_Rewards_Report_2016_web.pdf ^
  36. Sternthal, Michelle. “If the budget is a moral document, this one shows little but cruelty.” Oxfam America, The Politics of Poverty blog. May 25, 2017. Accessed October 03, 2017. https://politicsofpoverty.oxfamamerica.org/2017/05/if-the-budget-is-a-moral-document-this-one-shows-little-but-cruelty/ ^
  37. Babic, Mary. “Puzder as Secretary of Labor? His own workers say that’s a terrible idea.” Oxfam America, First Person Blog. February 15, 2017. Accessed October 03, 2017. https://firstperson.oxfamamerica.org/2017/02/puzder-as-secretary-of-labor-his-own-workers-say-thats-a-terrible-idea/. ^
  38. Nelson, Fraser. “What Oxfam won’t tell you about capitalism and poverty.” The Spectator. January 1, 2017. Accessed October 02, 2017. https://blogs.spectator.co.uk/2017/01/oxfam-wont-tell-capitalism-poverty/. ^
  39. Worstall, Tim. “Oxfam, Again, Show They Don’t Understand Economics, Tax Or Even Arithmetic.” Forbes. April 12, 2017. Accessed October 02, 2017. https://www.forbes.com/sites/timworstall/2017/04/12/oxfam-again-show-they-dont-understand-economics-tax-or-even-arithmetic/#727f85592b15. ^
  40. Brindle, David. “Oxfam boss admits errors over Scarlett Johansson row.” The Guardian. December 15, 2016. Accessed October 3, 2017.  https://www.theguardian.com/voluntary-sector-network/2016/dec/15/oxfam-pr-disaster-scarlett-johansson-perfect-storm-tweet ^
  41. JTA. “Anti-Israel group to Oxfam: Dump Scarlett Johansson over SodaStream.” The Times Of Israel. January 28, 2014. Accessed October 3, 2017.  https://www.timesofisrael.com/anti-israel-group-to-oxfam-dump-scarlett-johansson-over-sodastream/ ^
  42. Child, Ben. “Scarlett Johansson steps down from Oxfam ambassador role.” The Guardian. January 30, 2014. Accessed October 3, 2017. https://www.theguardian.com/film/2014/jan/30/scarlett-johansson-oxfam-quits-sodastream ^
  43. Eleftheriou-Smith, Loulla-Mae. “Scarlet Johansson has no regrets quitting Oxfam for SodaStream ad campaign.” The U.K. Independent. March 16, 2014. Accessed October 3, 2017. http://www.independent.co.uk/news/people/scarlet-johansson-has-no-regrets-quitting-oxfam-for-sodastream-ad-campaign-9195715.html ^
  44. Brindle, David. “Oxfam boss admits errors over Scarlett Johansson row.” The Guardian. December 15, 2016. Accessed October 3, 2017.  https://www.theguardian.com/voluntary-sector-network/2016/dec/15/oxfam-pr-disaster-scarlett-johansson-perfect-storm-tweet ^
  45. Yakupitiyage, Tharanga. “A Trump Doctrine of Hypocrisy.” Common Dreams. September 21, 2017. Accessed September 22, 2017. https://www.commondreams.org/views/2017/09/21/trump-doctrine-hypocrisy. ^
  46. “Oxfam submits amicus brief to Supreme Court, continuing legal fight against travel ban.” Oxfam America. September 19, 2017. Accessed October 03, 2017. https://www.oxfamamerica.org/press/oxfam-submits-amicus-brief-to-supreme-court-joining-legal-fight-against-travel-ban/. ^
  47. Estepa, Jessica. “Oxfam rents Trump’s childhood home, welcomes refugees into it.” USA Today. September 18, 2017. Accessed September 22, 2017. https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/onpolitics/2017/09/18/oxfam-rents-trumps-childhood-home-welcomes-refugees-into/677968001/. ^
  48. Sternthal, Michelle. “If the budget is a moral document, this one shows little but cruelty.” Oxfam America, The Politics of Poverty blog. May 25, 2017. Accessed October 03, 2017. https://politicsofpoverty.oxfamamerica.org/2017/05/if-the-budget-is-a-moral-document-this-one-shows-little-but-cruelty/ ^
  49. “Our Values: Oxfam America.” Oxfam America. Undated. Accessed September 22, 2017. https://www.oxfamamerica.org/explore/about-oxfam/our-values/. ^
  50. “Our Values: Oxfam America.” Oxfam America. Undated. Accessed September 22, 2017. https://www.oxfamamerica.org/explore/about-oxfam/our-values/. ^
  51. “Development And Faith Letter On TPP-TPA.” Oxfam America. April 30, 2015. Accessed October 2, 2017. https://www.oxfamamerica.org/static/media/files/development_and_faith_letter_on_TPP__TPA_-_30_April_2015.pdf. ^
  52. “Fast Track and TPP Bad for Development.” Oxfam America. April 30, 2015. Accessed October 02, 2017. https://www.oxfamamerica.org/press/fast-track-and-tpp-bad-for-development/. ^
  53. “Fast Track and TPP Bad for Development.” Oxfam America. April 30, 2015. Accessed October 02, 2017. https://www.oxfamamerica.org/press/fast-track-and-tpp-bad-for-development/. ^
  54. Coleman, Heather. “OPINION: Paris talks come at an urgent moment for the planet.” Al Jazeera America. December 1, 2015. Accessed October 02, 2017. http://america.aljazeera.com/opinions/2015/12/paris-talks-come-at-an-urgent-moment-for-the-planet.html. ^
  55. “Oxfam vehemently condemns President Trump’s announcement to withdraw from Paris Climate Agreement.” Oxfam America. June 1, 2017. Accessed October 02, 2017. https://www.oxfamamerica.org/press/oxfam-vehemently-condemns-president-trumps-announcement-to-withdraw-from-paris-climate-agreement/. ^
  56. Stedjan, Scott. “The Truth about the Arms Trade Treaty.” Oxfam America, Politics of Poverty blog. February 12, 2013. Accessed October 3, 2017.  https://politicsofpoverty.oxfamamerica.org/2013/02/truth-about-the-arms-trade-treaty/ ^
  57. Munoz, Eric. “A wake-up call on hunger and malnutrition.” Oxfam America, The Politics of Poverty blog. September 25, 2017. Accessed October 02, 2017. https://politicsofpoverty.oxfamamerica.org/2017/09/a-wake-up-call-on-hunger-and-malnutrition/. ^
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  64. Kredo, Adam. “Congress Seeks to Cut U.S. Aid to Islamic Charity Tied to Terror.” Washington Free Beacon. August 28, 2017. Accessed October 3, 2017. http://freebeacon.com/national-security/congress-seeks-cut-u-s-aid-islamic-charity-tied-terror/ ^
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  68. Oxfam America, Return of Organization Exempt from Income Tax (Form 990), 2016, Part I. https://www.oxfamamerica.org/static/media/files/Oxfam-America-Federal-Form-990-2016.pdf ^
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    720FDA19GR00086.” USASpending.gov. Accessed September 2, 2020. Available at: https://www.usaspending.gov/#/award/ASST_NON_720FDA19GR00086_7200 ^
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Nonprofit Information

  • Accounting Period: March - February
  • Tax Exemption Received: August 1, 1988

  • Available Filings

    Period Form Type Total revenue Total functional expenses Total assets (EOY) Total liabilities (EOY) Unrelated business income? Total contributions Program service revenue Investment income Comp. of current officers, directors, etc. Form 990
    2017 Mar Form 990 $79,172,637 $86,415,765 $81,998,618 $17,270,849 N $77,603,597 $0 $1,007,134 $2,419,687
    2016 Mar Form 990 $80,510,286 $89,017,017 $83,976,993 $14,970,961 N $78,818,402 $0 $767,009 $2,242,168 PDF
    2015 Mar Form 990 $92,324,198 $81,190,780 $93,685,005 $14,300,196 N $90,676,327 $0 $1,053,296 $2,426,108 PDF
    2014 Mar Form 990 $67,958,480 $81,768,356 $78,312,112 $11,696,688 N $66,575,765 $0 $893,777 $2,230,963 PDF
    2013 Mar Form 990 $65,422,324 $77,963,886 $88,914,901 $11,493,975 N $63,705,258 $0 $1,264,466 $2,352,649 PDF
    2012 Mar Form 990 $35,769,359 $37,844,433 $102,090,256 $14,562,849 N $34,993,203 $0 $539,313 $768,508 PDF
    2011 Oct Form 990 $78,507,568 $74,958,011 $99,690,397 $11,651,973 N $77,158,483 $0 $1,156,584 $1,774,531 PDF

    Additional Filings (PDFs)

    Oxfam America

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