Non-profit

Environmental Grantmakers Association

Website:

ega.org/

Location:

NEW YORK, NY

Tax ID:

20-8817646

Tax-Exempt Status:

501(c)(3)

Budget (2017):

Revenue: $3,122,540
Expenses: $2,741,773
Assets: $2,606,636

Formation:

1987

Executive Director:

Rachel Leon

The Environmental Grantmakers Association (EGA) is an organization that coordinates the distribution of grants to advance the left-of-center environmentalist movement. [1]  Formed in 1987, EGA began as a project of the Rockefeller Family Fund. [2]

EGA has since become a powerful consortium of agenda-setting foundations that today support a significant number of domestic and international left-of-center, anti-industry  activist environmentalist organizations. [3]

Environmental Grantmakers Association’s membership includes more than 200  foundations and left-of-center pass-through funding entities including the David Rockefeller Fund, NEO Philanthropy, and the Barr Foundation. [4] In 2015, the latest year reported publicly by EGA, EGA members awarded 12,895 grants totaling $1.54 billion. [5]

History

The Environmental Grantmakers Association (EGA) was formed as a collection of dues-paying environmental grant makers in 1987 by a group of foundation leaders to facilitate and increase grant funding to ecological causes. [6] EGA’s formation followed two years of informal meetings in Washington, D.C. that were led by Rockefeller Family Fund director Donald Ross and included the leaders of large foundations. Jon Jensen from Pew Charitable Trusts and Steve Viederman, president of the Noyes Foundation, were among the first attendees and EGA co-founders. [7]

Jon Jensen, then with the Pew Charitable Trusts, was EGA’s first coordinator. [8] Jensen volunteered to handle EGA business within the purview of his position with the newly-established Pew Scholars Program at the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor, taking advantage of the University’s tax exemption. [9]

EGA’s early members were foundation executives who had been involved with most of the nation’s environmental organizations, and by deciding which groups get money, EGA members set the agenda of the U.S. environmental movement. [10] Within a couple of years, after EGA became too big for Jensen to oversee from his University of Michigan office, the Rockefeller Family Fund (RFF) offered to house the EGA at its New York City offices and hired Pam Maurath as the organization’s first staff person. [11]

The EGA’s primary undertaking is holding annual retreats for executives of its member foundations and corporations, who hear plans and tactics of environmental groups, elected officials, and scholars. [12] EGA members then decide how they will distribute grants to advance the environmental movement. [13] In bankrolling a wide spectrum of environmental groups, the EGA plays a key role in determining the tactics and goals of the environmental movement. [14]

EGA members pay annual dues for access to annual meetings. In 1987, the organization’s first official year, its budget was $18,000; annual dues ranged from $50 to $2,000, and its 12 members distributed $68,279,877. By 2007, the budget was $1,644,133; annual dues ranged from $310 to $10,670, and 214 members distributed $582,773,227. [15]

The EGA obtained independent nonprofit status in 2007. [16] Though the EGA is a separate corporate entity, it remains headquartered with the RFF in New York City and is widely referred to as a project of the Rockefeller Family Fund and an affinity group of the Council on Foundations. [17]

In 2007, EGA began to produce a biennial report called “Tracking the Field” based on its members’ giving data. By 2013, EGA members’ grantmaking made up 40 percent of all environmental philanthropy. [18] In 2015, EGA members $1.54 billion in environmental giving composed 30 percent of all environmental philanthropy by U.S. foundations. [19]

Finances and Corporate Structure

According to 2017 IRS Form 990, EGA reported total revenues of $3,122,540; total expenses of $2,741,773; and total assets of $2,606,636. EGA reported having 11 employees, 10 volunteers, and 16 voting members of its governing body. [20] Its two highest paid employees are Rachel Leon, the executive director, whose total 2017 compensation was $225,178, and Angie Chen, director, whose total 2017 compensation was $167,687. [21]

Controversies

Corporate Membership

During its early years, Environmental Grantmakers Association drew criticism from left-wing environmental activists for admitting big corporations seen as trying to infiltrate and buy off the environmentalist movement.

In 1988, Dr. William Y. Brown, public affairs director for Waste Management, Inc. (WMI), attended EGA’s second official annual meeting in Princeton, New Jersey. According to a 1990 article in Mother Jones, WMI’s presence at the meeting made several funders very uncomfortable due to its reputation among green activists as a polluter. Other EGA members supported WMI’s inclusion into EGA because the company was giving generous grants to several environmentalist organizations. EGA eventually admitted WMI. [22]

The controversy surrounding WMI’s membership polarized EGA to the point that some EGA members quietly asked Greenpeace to protest EGA. [23] Greenpeace did so by picketing EGA’s 1989 annual fall meeting in San Francisco. [24] EGA expelled WMI two years later. [25]

The EGA admitted the oil company Chevron Corporation in 1990. [26] Some EGA members opposed the membership, telling Mother Jones in 1991 that “There’s a lot of discomfort here. Some of us feel troubled to be supporting a group fighting Chevron and sitting next to Chevron, talking strategy.” [27]

Senate Investigation

The Environmental Grantmakers Association featured prominently in a 2014 report from the Republican staff of the U.S. Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works titled “The Chain of Environmental Command: How a Club of Billionaires and Their Foundations Control the Environmental Movement and Obama’s EPA.” [28] The report, directed by then-U.S. Senator  David Vitter (R-LA), the committee’s ranking minority member, explains that the EGA is “unquestionably the funding epicenter of the environmental movement” through which an elite group of left-wing millionaires and billionaires directs and controls the environmentalist movement, which in turn controls major policy decisions and lobbies the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. [29]

The report describes EGA one of the central planners of environmental strategy and as being secretive for having refused to disclose its membership list to Congress upon request, which is EGA’s legal right. It also explained EGA’s use of prescriptive grantmaking, that is, EGA members specify how recipients must use their grant money, thus driving its own agenda with selective grants. [30]

According to the Senate report, Democracy Alliance adopted many of the lessons learned by EGA in its own effort to create an all-encompassing left-wing infrastructure to support affiliated and approved groups. [31]

An email exchange between Michelle DePass, an EGA board member who would soon be employed at EPA, and the Obama administration’s top-level EPA leadership revealed an attempt to leverage a public appearance by EPA’s then-director Lisa Jackson before the EGA, and enhance Jackson’s influence with EGA. [32]

Leadership

Rachel Leon has been the executive director of Environmental Grantmakers Association since 2012. She started with EGA in 2009 after working as a senior program manager at the JEHT Foundation in New York City and as executive director of the New York State branch of Common Cause. She was also on the transition teams for New York Governors Eliot Spitzer (D) and Andrew Cuomo (D). [33]

Dana Lanza was the executive director of EGA from 2005-2009. Upon leaving EGA in 2009, Lanza founded Confluence Philanthropy, a funding coordination nonprofit that supports left-of-center groups.

Sarah Hansen was EGA executive director from 1998-2005. [34]

Jon Jensen was EGA’s first coordinator. [35] He also served twice as EGA’s board chair. He is currently the executive director of the Park Foundation and has previously held positions with Pew Charitable Trusts, the Wildlife Preservation Trust International, and the Funders Network for Smart Growth and Livable Communities. [36]

Rhea Suh is a former EGA board member who has held chair and vice chair positions. [37] She is currently the president of the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC); Suh previously worked as assistant secretary for policy, management, and budget for the U.S. Department of the Interior, appointed by President Obama in 2009. [38] In 2014, President Obama nominated Suh to head the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, a nomination that was derailed when her involvement with EGA became a focal point during Senate confirmation hearings. [39] From 1998 to 2009, Suh worked for two major environmentalist foundations, the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation and the David and Lucile Packard Foundation.

Bruce Boyd is a former EGA board member and principal at Arabella Advisors, where he has an investment portfolio focused largely on environmentalist issues including climate change and water and land conservation. Boyd is also a senior advisor to the left-leaning grantmaking organization New Venture Fund and serves on the board of the Hopewell Fund and the Windward Fund. [40]

Ken Grossinger is a former EGA board member and chair who works as a left-wing political consultant for Democracy Partners where he advises several of the nation’s largest left-wing donors and foundations (such as the Ford Foundation and billionaire left-wing donor Jon Stryker). He also chairs the CrossCurrents Foundation and the Alliance for Justice, and is on the board of the Nation Institute. He previously worked as a political strategist for the Service Employees International Union and the AFL-CIO. [41]

Adam Harms works as the program and communications manager for EGA. Prior to his work at EGA, he was worked for Global Health Strategies, supporting new media strategies on behalf of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. [42]

Jumana Vasi is an EGA board member and director of the Windward Fund, an environmentalist fiscal sponsor organization in the network of “dark money” organizations controlled by philanthropic consultancy Arabella Advisors. Vasi was previously a program officer in the C. S. Mott Foundation’s Environment Program, and has assisted on environmentalist projects at the Environmental Protection Agency and the Federal Aviation Administration. [43]

Michelle DePass is a former EGA board member who currently works as a civil rights lawyer and president and CEO of Meyer Memorial Trust, an Oregon-based advocacy organization. DePass previously worked at the Center for Constitutional Rights, the Environmental Protection Agency as an Obama administration appointee, and as a program officer at the Ford Foundation. [44]

References

  1. “The Chain of Environmental Command: How a Club of Billionaires and Their Foundations Control the Environmental Movement and Obama’s EPA.” Washington, D.C., July 30, 2014. https://eelegal.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/FINAL-Enviro-Funding-report_7.30.14.pdf. ^
  2. “Shareholder Resources.” Proxy Preview. As you Sow. Accessed October 2, 2019. https://www.proxypreview.org/shareholder-resources. ^
  3. Pell, Eve. “Buying In: How Corporations Keep an Eye on Environmental Groups That Oppose Them – by Giving Big Wads of Money.” Mother Jones, April-May 1990. ^
  4. Arnold, Ron. “The Hidden Persuaders of the Environmental Elite.” Washington Examiner. August 05, 2014. Accessed August 06, 2019. https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/the-hidden-persuaders-of-the-environmental-elite. ^
  5. “EGA Tracking the Field Volume 6.” New York, NY, n.d. https://ega.org/sites/default/files/pubs/summaries/EGA%20Tracking%20the%20Field%20Volume%206%20Executive%20Summary.pdf. ^
  6. Burlingame, Dwight. “Philanthropy in America: A Comprehensive Historical Encyclopedia (3 Vol Set) – PDF Free Download.” epdf.pub. EPDF.PUB. Accessed September 15, 2019. https://epdf.pub/philanthropy-in-america-a-comprehensive-historical-encyclopedia-3-vol-set.html. ^
  7. “EGA 30th Anniversary Journal 1987-2017.” New York, NY, n.d. “EGA 30th Anniversary Journal 1987-2017.” New York, NY, n.d.http://piscesfoundation.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/07/EGA-30th-Anniversary-Journal-2017.pdf. ^
  8. EGA Journal Fall 2007.” New York, NY, n.d. http://www.polishedwriting.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/CLIP-EGA_journal.pdf. ^
  9. Arnold, Ron, and Alan Gottlieb. Trashing the Economy: How Runaway Environmentalism Is Wrecking America. Bellevue (Washington): Free Enterprise Press, 1994. ^
  10. Pell, Eve. “Buying In: How Corporations Keep an Eye on Environmental Groups That Oppose Them – by Giving Big Wads of Money.” Mother Jones, April-May 1990. ^
  11. “EGA Journal Fall 2007.” New York, NY, n.d. http://www.polishedwriting.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/CLIP-EGA_journal.pdf. ^
  12. Burlingame, Dwight. “Philanthropy in America: A Comprehensive Historical Encyclopedia (3 Vol Set) – PDF Free Download.” epdf.pub. EPDF.PUB. Accessed September 15, 2019. https://epdf.pub/philanthropy-in-america-a-comprehensive-historical-encyclopedia-3-vol-set.html. ^
  13. “The Chain of Environmental Command: How a Club of Billionaires and Their Foundations Control the Environmental Movement and Obama’s EPA.” Washington, D.C., July 30, 2014. https://eelegal.org/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/FINAL-Enviro-Funding-report_7.30.14.pdf. ^
  14. Pell, Eve. “Oiling the Works: How Chevron Bought Its Way into Environmentalism’s Power Circle.” Mother Jones, March-April 1991. ^
  15. “EGA Journal Fall 2007.” New York, NY, n.d. http://www.polishedwriting.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/CLIP-EGA_journal.pdf. ^
  16. “EGA Journal Fall 2007.” New York, NY, n.d. http://www.polishedwriting.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/CLIP-EGA_journal.pdf. ^
  17. “Center for the Environment: Leadership Fellowship Openings.” Mt. Holyoke College, April 16, 2006. https://www.mtholyoke.edu/proj/cel/fellowship/envirograntmakers.shtml. ^
  18. Williams, Tate. “Where Is Environmental Giving Headed? Here’s a (Mostly) Hopeful Look.” Inside Philanthropy, February 16, 2016. https://www.insidephilanthropy.com/home/2016/2/16/where-is-environmental-giving-headed-heres-a-mostly-hopeful.html. ^
  19. “EGA Tracking the Field Volume 6.” New York, NY, n.d. https://ega.org/sites/default/files/pubs/summaries/EGA%20Tracking%20the%20Field%20Volume%206%20Executive%20Summary.pdf. ^
  20. Environmental Grantmakers Association, Return of Organization Exempt from Income Tax (Form 990), 2017, Part I. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/organizations/208817646. ^
  21. Environmental Grantmakers Association, Return of Organization Exempt from Income Tax (Form 990), 2017, Part VII. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/organizations/208817646. ^
  22. Dowie, Mark. American Foundations: an Investigative History. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press, 2002. ^
  23. Pell, Eve. “Oiling the Works: How Chevron Bought Its Way into Environmentalism’s Power Circle.” Mother Jones, March-April 1991. ^
  24. Pell, Eve. “Buying In: How Corporations Keep an Eye on Environmental Groups That Oppose Them – by Giving Big Wads of Money.” Mother Jones, 1990. ^
  25. Echeverria, John D., and Raymond Booth. Eby. Let the People Judge Wise Use and the Private Property Rights Movement. Washington, D.C.: Island Press, 1995. ^
  26. Echeverria, John D., and Raymond Booth. Eby. Let the People Judge Wise Use and the Private Property Rights Movement. Washington, D.C.: Island Press, 1995. ^
  27. Pell, Eve. “Oiling the Works: How Chevron Bought Its Way into Environmentalism’s Power Circle.” Mother Jones, 1991. ^
  28. “The Chain of Environmental Command: How a Club of Billionaires and Their Foundations Control the Environmental Movement and Obama’s EPA.” Washington, D.C., July 30, 2014. https://www.epw.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/2014/7/post-53280dcb-9f2c-2e3a-7092-10cf6d8d08df. ^
  29. Arnold, Ron. “The Hidden Persuaders of the Environmental Elite.” Washington Examiner. August 05, 2014. Accessed August 06, 2019. https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/the-hidden-persuaders-of-the-environmental-elite. ^
  30. “The Chain of Environmental Command: How a Club of Billionaires and Their Foundations Control the Environmental Movement and Obama’s EPA.” Washington, D.C., July 30, 2014. https://www.epw.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/2014/7/post-53280dcb-9f2c-2e3a-7092-10cf6d8d08df. ^
  31. “The Chain of Environmental Command: How a Club of Billionaires and Their Foundations Control the Environmental Movement and Obama’s EPA.” Washington, D.C., July 30, 2014. https://www.epw.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/2014/7/post-53280dcb-9f2c-2e3a-7092-10cf6d8d08df. ^
  32. “The Chain of Environmental Command: How a Club of Billionaires and Their Foundations Control the Environmental Movement and Obama’s EPA.” Washington, D.C., July 30, 2014. https://www.epw.senate.gov/public/index.cfm/2014/7/post-53280dcb-9f2c-2e3a-7092-10cf6d8d08df. ^
  33. “Rachel Leon.” n.d. Blue Sky Funders Forum. Accessed October 21, 2019. https://blueskyfundersforum.org/about/steering-committee/rachel-leon ^
  34. Duffy, Caitlin. 2015. “NRCP: [BLOG] How Can Philanthropy Support Leaders of Color in the Environmental Movement?” Green 2.0. February 10, 2015. https://www.diversegreen.org/nrcp-blog-how-can-philanthropy-support-leaders-of-color-in-the-environmental-movement/. ^
  35. EGA Journal Fall 2007.” New York, NY, n.d. http://www.polishedwriting.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/CLIP-EGA_journal.pdf. ^
  36. “Jon M. Jensen.” n.d. Yale Center for Business and the Environment. Accessed October 21, 2019. https://cbey.yale.edu/our-community/jon-m-jensen. ^
  37. Staff, Grist. 2005. “Four Environmental Funders Join the Debate over the Movement’s Future.” Grist. Grist. March 29, 2005. https://grist.org/article/funders/#suh. ^
  38. Mock, Brentin. 2016. “NRDC’s New President Gets Serious about Diversity.” Grist. Grist. April 4, 2016. https://grist.org/people/nrdcs-new-president-gets-serious-about-diversity/. ^
  39. Arnold, Ron. 2013. “One of President Obama’s Most Radical Interior Nominees Is Confronted by Sen. John Barrasso.” Washington Examiner. December 14, 2013. https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/one-of-president-obamas-most-radical-interior-nominees-is-confronted-by-sen-john-barrasso. ^
  40. “Bruce Boyd.” Lilly Family School of Philanthropy. Accessed September 8, 2019. https://philanthropy.iupui.edu/people-directory/boyd-bruce.html. ^
  41. “Ken Grossinger.” Alliance for Justice. Accessed October 28, 2019. https://www.afj.org/about-afj/bios/ken-grossinger. ^
  42. “Adam Harms.” Nicholas School of the Environment. Accessed October 28, 2019. https://nicholas.duke.edu/people/students/harms. ^
  43. “Jumana Vasi Full.” Windward Fund. Accessed October 24, 2019. https://www.windwardfund.org/jumana-vasi-full/. ^
  44. “DePass, Michelle.” Center for Constitutional Rights. Accessed October 28, 2019. https://ccrjustice.org/home/who-we-are/board/depass-michelle. ^

Directors, Employees & Supporters

  1. Bruce Boyd
    Former Board Member
  2. Dana Lanza
    Former Executive Director

Coalition Members

  1. Alaska Conservation Foundation (Non-profit)
  2. Amalgamated Charitable Foundation (Non-profit)
  3. American Jewish World Service (Non-profit)
  4. Arkay Foundation (Non-profit)
  5. As You Sow (Non-profit)
  6. Barr Foundation (Non-profit)
  7. Ben & Jerry’s Foundation (Non-profit)
  8. Bloomberg Family Foundation (Bloomberg Philanthropies) (Non-profit)
  9. Boston Foundation (Non-profit)
  10. Brainerd Foundation (Non-profit)
  11. Bullitt Foundation (Non-profit)
  12. California Wellness Foundation (Non-profit)
  13. Campion Foundation (Non-profit)
  14. Chorus Foundation (Non-profit)
  15. ClimateWorks Foundation (Non-profit)
  16. Common Counsel Foundation (Non-profit)
  17. Compton Foundation (Non-profit)
  18. CrossCurrents Foundation (Non-profit)
  19. David and Lucile Packard Foundation (Non-profit)
  20. David Rockefeller Fund (Non-profit)
  21. Doris Duke Charitable Foundation (Non-profit)
  22. Dyer-Ives Foundation (Non-profit)
  23. EcoViva (Non-profit)
  24. Educational Foundation of America (Non-profit)
  25. Energy Foundation (Non-profit)
  26. Enlyst Fund (Non-profit)
  27. Estee Lauder Companies Charitable Foundation (Non-profit)
  28. Fledgling Fund (Non-profit)
  29. Ford Foundation (Non-profit)
  30. George B. Storer Foundation (Non-profit)
  31. George Gund Foundation (Non-profit)
  32. Geraldine R. Dodge Foundation (Non-profit)
  33. Global Greengrants Fund (Non-profit)
  34. Gordon E. and Betty I. Moore Foundation (Non-profit)
  35. Grassroots International (Non-profit)
  36. Growald Family Fund (Non-profit)
  37. Harder Foundation (Non-profit)
  38. Heinrich Boell Foundation (Non-profit)
  39. Heinz Endowments (Non-profit)
  40. Heising-Simons Foundation (Non-profit)
  41. HKH Foundation (Non-profit)
  42. Houston Endowment (Non-profit)
  43. Hudson River Foundation for Science and Environmental Research (Non-profit)
  44. J. M. Kaplan Fund (Non-profit)
  45. Jenifer Altman Foundation (Non-profit)
  46. Jessie Smith Noyes Foundation (Non-profit)
  47. John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation (Non-profit)
  48. Joyce Foundation (Non-profit)
  49. JPB Foundation (Non-profit)
  50. Kendeda Fund (Non-profit)
  51. Kresge Foundation (Non-profit)
  52. Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust (Non-profit)
  53. Liberty Hill Foundation (Non-profit)
  54. Lisa and Douglas Goldman Fund (Non-profit)
  55. Marcus Foundation (Non-profit)
  56. Marin Community Foundation (Non-profit)
  57. Mary Reynolds Babcock Foundation (Non-profit)
  58. Maverick Lloyd Foundation (Non-profit)
  59. McIntosh Foundation (Non-profit)
  60. McKnight Foundation (Non-profit)
  61. Mertz Gilmore Foundation (Non-profit)
  62. Morton K. and Jane Blaustein Foundation (Non-profit)
  63. Charles Stewart Mott Foundation (Non-profit)
  64. Mulago Foundation (Non-profit)
  65. Nathan Cummings Foundation (Non-profit)
  66. National Geographic Society (Non-profit)
  67. National Park Foundation (Non-profit)
  68. Needmor Fund (Non-profit)
  69. New England Grassroots Environment Fund (Non-profit)
  70. New Priorities Foundation (Non-profit)
  71. New Venture Fund (NVF) (Non-profit)
  72. Oak Foundation USA (Non-profit)
  73. Panta Rhea Foundation (Non-profit)
  74. Park Foundation (Non-profit)
  75. Passport Foundation (Non-profit)
  76. Pew Charitable Trusts (Non-profit)
  77. Quixote Foundation (Non-profit)
  78. Resources Legacy Fund (Non-profit)
  79. Rockefeller Brothers Fund (Non-profit)
  80. Rockefeller Family Fund (Non-profit)
  81. Rockefeller Foundation (Non-profit)
  82. Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors (Non-profit)
  83. S.D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation (Non-profit)
  84. San Francisco Foundation (Non-profit)
  85. Sapelo Foundation (Non-profit)
  86. Silicon Valley Community Foundation (Non-profit)
  87. Solidago Foundation (Non-profit)
  88. Surdna Foundation (Non-profit)
  89. Thousand Currents (Non-profit)
  90. Threshold Foundation (Non-profit)
  91. Tides Canada Foundation (Non-profit)
  92. Tides Foundation (Non-profit)
  93. Tiffany & Co. Foundation (Non-profit)
  94. Town Creek Foundation (Non-profit)
  95. Turner Foundation (Non-profit)
  96. Unitarian Universalist Congregation at Shelter Rock (Non-profit)
  97. United Nations Foundation (Non-profit)
  98. V. Kann Rasmussen Foundation (Non-profit)
  99. W. K. Kellogg Foundation (Non-profit)
  100. Wallace Global Fund (Non-profit)
  101. Walton Family Foundation (Non-profit)
  102. Weeden Foundation (Non-profit)
  103. WestWind Foundation (Non-profit)
  104. Wilburforce Foundation (Non-profit)
  105. William and Flora Hewlett Foundation (Non-profit)
  106. William Penn Foundation (Non-profit)
  107. Windward Fund (Non-profit)
  108. Women’s Foundation of California (Non-profit)
  109. Z Smith Reynolds Foundation (Non-profit)

Coalition Memberships

  1. Overbrook Foundation
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Nonprofit Information

  • Accounting Period: December - November
  • Tax Exemption Received: June 1, 2007

  • Available Filings

    Period Form Type Total revenue Total functional expenses Total assets (EOY) Total liabilities (EOY) Unrelated business income? Total contributions Program service revenue Investment income Comp. of current officers, directors, etc. Form 990
    2017 Dec Form 990 $3,122,540 $2,741,773 $2,606,636 $301,849 N $2,679,040 $443,191 $309 $233,150 PDF
    2016 Dec Form 990 $2,728,418 $2,539,563 $2,273,690 $349,670 N $2,452,540 $268,205 $306 $220,775
    2015 Dec Form 990 $2,358,573 $1,999,231 $2,038,179 $303,014 N $2,095,256 $256,995 $374 $205,780 PDF
    2014 Dec Form 990 $2,045,465 $1,728,738 $1,882,999 $507,176 N $1,846,318 $198,324 $609 $202,198 PDF
    2013 Dec Form 990 $1,603,367 $1,426,222 $1,173,092 $94,796 N $1,304,575 $267,428 $919 $137,317 PDF
    2012 Dec Form 990 $1,295,389 $1,232,034 $1,214,544 $313,393 N $991,510 $286,473 $1,055 $184,374 PDF
    2011 Dec Form 990 $1,439,484 $1,455,851 $996,392 $158,596 N $1,132,036 $290,860 $1,557 $164,880 PDF
    2010 Dec Form 990 $1,064,469 $1,206,459 $991,245 $137,082 N $730,323 $316,925 $2,090 $158,792 PDF

    Additional Filings (PDFs)

    Environmental Grantmakers Association

    475 RIVERSIDE DR RM 900
    NEW YORK, NY 10115-0066