Non-profit

U.S. Public Interest Research Group (US-PIRG)

U.S. PIRG logo (link)
Website:

www.uspirg.org

Location:

WASHINGTON, DC

Tax ID:

04-2790740

DUNS Number:

60-277-2910

Tax-Exempt Status:

501(c)(4)

Budget (2015):

Revenue: $1,328,490
Expenses: $1,048,376
Assets: $7,220,674

Formation:

1970

Founder:

Ralph Nader

Executive Director:

Andre Delattre

Predecessor:

Marjorie Alt [62]

Founded by left-wing activist and former Presidential candidate Ralph Nader, the U.S. Public Interest Research Group is a 501(c)(4) organization that oversees a federation of state progressive advocacy groups also known as “PIRGs.” As the national organization for these independent state-based PIRGs, U.S. PIRG coordinates resources among its 47 state affiliates to make the “biggest impact” for its liberal advocacy efforts. The U.S. PIRG also serves as the “federal lobbying office for state PIRGs” seeking to make left-of-center state laws into federal policy and turning unsuccessful liberal federal lobbying efforts into state laws.[1]

The PIRGs’ administrative and financial practices are highly controversial. The PIRG campus fundraising model has been sharply criticized for imposing hidden fees on students and then funneling those funds through the campus PIRG to both the state PIRG and the U.S. PIRG, leaving little money on campus where the funds were generated.[2]

Additionally, the U.S. PIRG is part of a larger network of like-minded and well-funded progressive organizations that seek to align themself with the PIRG network.[3]  The most notable of these organizations is the Fund For the Public Interest, which is seen as the fundraising arm of the U.S. PIRG and has been widely criticized for its abusive employment practices as it relates to students, being billed “the liberal sweatshop.”[4] In 2016, U.S. PIRG was hammered as hypocritical for claiming to fight for progressive values while opposing the Obama administration’s expansion of employees subject to time-and-a-half overtime pay rules.[5]

Background

Growing out of the student activism of the 1960s and early 1970s, including “Nader’s Raiders,”[6] Ralph Nader, along with lawyer Donald Ross, sought “to put into place a model based on the work of their book Action for a Change: A Student’s Manual for Public Interest Organizing. With Nader serving as founder and Ross visiting college campuses for recruitment, the concept of public interest research groups, or PIRGs…[came] to fruition.”[7]

PIRGs originated as college campus-based organizations.[8] Over time, those campus PIRGs expanded to become “state PIRGs with Minnesota, Oregon, New York, and Massachusetts becoming the first states to do so.”[9]

State PIRGs are nonprofit nonpartisan, public-interest advocacy groups,” which Nader envisioned would be “grassroots lobbying groups for progressive legislation.”[10] These groups are generally “independent and self-sustaining.”[11]

In 1977, the PIRGs created their first national association, National PIRG Clearinghouse, which dissolved in 1979.[12]  Then in 1983, “several state PIRGs formed U.S. PIRG, a federation of state PIRGs and the national advocacy office.”[13]

Ties to Barack Obama

Around 1984, a year after graduating from college, Barack Obama, the future 44th President of the United States, “was hired by the New York Public Interest Research Group,” where he served as “a full-time organizer at City College in Harlem,” to mobilize student volunteers.”[14]

In 2004, then-Illinois State Senator Obama said to U.S. PIRG’s then-leader, Gene Karpinski: “I used to be a PIRG guy. You guys trained me well.’”[15] Of this exchange, an observer subsequently wrote, “The fact that Obama still felt that way 25 years after he was a young and impressionable PIRG organizer is a terrifying statement that speaks directly to Obama’s competency and character.”[16]

Programs

U.S. PIRG bills itself as “a federation of independent, state-based PIRG organizations that advocate for the public interest.”[17] There are forty-seven state PIRG groups that employ 400 organizers, policy analysts, scientists, and attorneys, and the organization has its national office in Washington, D.C.[18]

Located in Washington, D.C., the U.S. PIRG is the federal lobby office for the state PIRGs.[19] Additionally, on national issues, the U.S. PIRG coordinates efforts, pools resources and shared expertise in order to create the “biggest impact.”[20]

The organization uses “targeted research, coalition building, outreach to citizen activists and the media, and direct lobbying of decision-makers,” to provide resources to their “a network of state-based consumer advocacy groups” around the country.[21]

Meanwhile, State PIRGs, as part of the U.S. PIRG Federation, are “independent and self sustaining” organizations that deliver “results-oriented citizen activism” using “the time-tested tools of investigative research, media exposés, grassroots organizing, advocacy and litigation” on behalf of the U.S. PIRG’s state-specific priority issues.[22]

Lobbying Activities

U.S. PIRG, as the “national office,” has traditionally been known as the “federal lobbying office for the state PIRGs.” “Lobbying by U.S. PIRG has focused on taking state PIRG initiatives to the national level.” For example, U.S. PIRG took bank legislation supported by MASSPIRG and NYPIRG and advocated for the creation of similar federal policy. Similarly, when U.S. PIRG’s efforts to pass federal legislation fail, they rely on state PIRGs to fight for state laws.[23]

In total, U.S. PIRG has spent over $725k on federal lobbying expenses since 2012.[24]

Year U.S. PIRG Lobbying Expenses $
2012 $236,800
2013 $144,864
2014 $75,848
2015 $168,364
2016 $80,000
2017 $20,000
Total $725,876

U.S. PIRG has lobbied on 357 bills over the past four Congresses, including a total of 872 specific reports or issues.[25]

Congress # Of Bills # Of Reports & Specific Issues
112 (2011-2012) 93 247
113 (2013-2014) 118 317
114 (2015-2016) 123 285
115 (2017-2018) 23 23
Total 357 872

U.S. PIRG lobbied for and was seen as a “driving force”[26] in the creation of the 2012 the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, a controversial U.S. government agency which was founded as a result of the Dodd–Frank Act in the wake of the late-2000s recession and the financial crisis.[27]

Finances

U.S. PIRG’s annual IRS disclosure for 2014 indicates that the organization raised and spent approximately $1.5 million annually and had over $5 million in net assets at the end of the year.[28]

Budget Item 2014 Amount 2013 Amount
Total Revenue $ $1,328,490 $1,473,459
Total Expenses $ $1,048,376 $1,508,634
Total Assets $7,220,674 $5,590,658
Total Liabilities $1,735,219 $397,279
Net Assets (End of Year) $5,485,455 $5,193,379

The US. PIRG organization is “funded by dues contributions from member state PIRGs and individual memberships from its own canvass operations.”[29]  As of 2003, Radley Balko indicated that ten percent of campus PIRG funds were funneled to U.S. PIRG’s national chapter.[30]

The following is the revenue breakdown for U.S. PIRG in 2013 and 2014.[31] This breakdown shows that in 2014, over 50% of U.S. PIRG’s revenues came from “Membership dues”[32] but in 2013, the group did not declare any revenues due to that same source.[33]

Support or Revenue Source 2014 Amount 2014 % of Revenue 2013 Amount
Membership Dues $679,191 51.13% $0
Other Contributions & Grants $508,495 38.28% $840,036
Program service revenue $495,769 1.95% $25,916
Investment income $8,729 0.66% $33,945
Other Revenue $106,159 7.99% $103,709
Total Support and Revenues $1,328,490   $1,473,459

U.S. PIRG Structure & Relation to U.S. PIRG Education Fund

The U.S. PIRG is a distinct legal entity from the U.S. PIRG Education Fund. U.S. PIRG refers to this group, as its “sister C3.”[34] U.S. PIRG Education Fund is U.S. PIRG’s affiliated “tax-deductible research and education arm, funded mainly by foundation grants.”[35]

Under this structure, the student PIRG (U.S. PIRG Education Fund) is a 501(c)(3) organization that can accept public funds but is limited in its ability to lobby, but the state PIRGs and U.S. PIRG are organized under 501(c)(4), meaning they cannot accept public funds but can lobby without limit.[36]

Campus PIRG Funding Schemes

Critics have noted that the flow of money between Student PIRGs and State PIRGs — which sometimes share the same name and personnel — is deliberately confusing.[37] Moreover, the campus-based PIRG funding system has been criticized for generating funds, using controversial, automatic, and complicated student activity fees or student government contracts, which are then funneled money to the PIRG’s state and national lobbying operations, leaving little if any money on the campus where its generated.

Radley Balko has written:

Each time a college student registers for classes, he or she is automatically billed somewhere between three and eight dollars, all of which goes directly to the local PIRG chapter.

There, it’s funneled directly to the state chapter, where it’s used to lobby state legislatures on issues like tougher emissions standards, campaign finance reform and a bevy of other environmental and anti-corporate causes. Very little if any of the money actually stays at the campus where it’s generated.

It’s also used as “seed money” for more fund-raising campaigns. And about 10 percent of the money goes to USPIRG, the national chapter, where it’s used to lobby on the federal level.[38]

On more than one occasion, university PIRGs have been criticized or questioned for using these questionable funding schemes.[39]  The Weekly Standard’s Mark Hemingway noted that though “PIRG tactics may vary across the country… It is fair to say that PIRG organizing everywhere has a shady reputation, even among those who would otherwise be the ideological compatriots of PIRGs.”[40]

Another observer estimated that the PIRG nationwide “causes take in somewhere between $10 and $20 million annually from college students, most all of it unwittingly.”[41]

Moreover, these critics note that this funding mechanism is hypocritical given PIRG’s stance on campaign finance. Balko wrote, “What’s remarkable is the blatant, transparent hypocrisy the PIRGS use to defend their tactics…Get it? The act of forcing students at state colleges to fund causes they don’t believe in is ‘protected speech,’ but voluntarily giving to a political candidate isn’t. Remarkable.”[42]

Public Interest Network

Also see Public Interest Network (Nonprofit)

Over time, organizations arose and tried to ally themselves with the PIRGs. These alliances eventually gave rise to the Public Interest Network.[43] Through The Public Interest Network PIRG allied organizations “work together on common progressive causes.”[44]

Other organizations affiliated with the Public Interest Network are Environmental ActionCenter for Public Interest ResearchToxics Action Center, Pesticide WatchGreen Century FundsGreen Corps, National Environmental Law CenterFrontier Group, Community Voters ProjectSnowriders InternationalAccelerate Change, and Voices for Progress, and Impact.[45]

Fund for the Public Interest

Also see Fund for the Public Interest (Nonprofit)

The Fund for the Public Interest is a separate organization founded in 1982 that has been described as “the fundraising and canvassing arm for the PIRGs.”[46]  “The fund” conducts “door-to-door canvassing campaigns for PIRGs and other allied groups that “not only raise funds but also are used to educate and build support from citizens for PIRG campaigns.”[47]

In addition to its work with the PIRG organization, the Fund has been criticized as a mechanism through which “groups such as Environment America, Sierra Club, and the Human Rights Campaign primarily outsource grassroots organizing.”[48]

U.S. Public Interest Research Group Education Fund

The U.S. Public Interest Research Group Education Fund is U.S. PIRG’s  501(c)(3) research arm. According to the group, it “offers an independent voice that works on behalf of the public interest.”[49]

State-Based PIRGs

Currently, under the federation of the U.S. PIRG, there are forty-seven state PIRG groups that employ 400 organizers, policy analysts, scientists, and attorneys and the organization has its national office in Washington, D.C.

Campus Student PIRGs

Local chapters that operate at public universities. “Ninety staff currently work with more than 1200 student interns and 12,500 volunteers on more than 100 campuses. Since 1997, the PIRGs have added new chapters at nine new campuses, increased funding for the program through student membership dues, and attracted grant support from such foundations as the Pew Charitable Trusts, the Carnegie Corporation of New York and the Open Society Institute [now Open Society Foundations].”[50]

Environment America

Also see Environment America (Nonprofit)

Environment America is organization that separated from the state PIRGs in 2007 to focus solely on its environmentalist work while the state PIRG groups would focus on other progressive movement issues. Environment America has 29 state affiliates including large-scale organizations in California, Texas, and New York.[51]

Controversies and Criticism

“Sweatshop” Canvassing

The nonprofit Fund for Public Interest Inc. is set up “as the fundraising arm of the network of Public Interest Research Groups,” and it is known for “deploy[ing] legions of door-to-door and street canvassers.”[52]

However, the group has been criticized as the “Walmart of nonprofits” for its “sweatshop” like labor techniques where, “in many cases…the employees collecting those donations made an hourly rate that worked out to less than minimum wage.” In one instance, in the summer of 2005, canvassers tried to unionize their Los Angeles office and the local office abruptly “shut down overnight.”[53]

In a separate case in 2006, the office of the Labor Commissioner of the State of California determined that the Fund had denied rest breaks to a worker, awarding a cash payment. The Fund subsequently changed its policies to provide overtime pay. In 2009, it agreed to settle the class-action suit.[54]

Compromised Progressive Values

In 2016, the U.S. PIRG opposed a new Department of Labor rule that was cheered by labor unions, which would vastly expand the number of workers who must be paid time and a half after 40 hours in a week.[55] According to U.S. PIRG President, their organization was opposed to the rule because the organization would be “forced to hire fewer staffers.”[56] Observers noted that “U.S. PIRG’s strong opposition to the rule suggests it may have many staffers who earn less than $47,500 a year but regularly work more than 40 hours in a week.”[57]

Other critics blasted this policy decision as “a slap in the face to the employees of the U.S. PIRG,” and noted that the decision was “hypocritical and shameful” for an organization claiming to fight for the public interest.[58]

Leadership

Executive Director

Andre Delattre has served as executive director of U.S. PIRG and the U.S. PIRG Education Fund in 2007, and the national campus director for the student PIRGs. [59]

President and Board of Directors

Douglas H. Phelps is president and chairman of the board for U.S. PIRG. Phelps is also chair of the advisory board of the Fund for the Public Interest.[60]

As of 2014, the following individuals served on the board of directors of U.S. PIRG[61]:

  • Diane Brown
  • Janet Domenitz
  • Brian Imus
  • Donna Farvard, Vice Chair
  • Douglas H. Phelps, Chairman

References

  1. Editors: Brobeck, Stephen & Mayer, Robert N. “Watchdogs and Whistleblowers: A Reference Guide to Consumer Activism.” Santa Barbara, California. Greenwood. 2015. Accessed July 19, 2017. https://books.google.com/books?id=uUUMCgAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false.
  2. Balko, Radley. “Opinion: Nader Scams College Kids.” Fox News. March 13, 2003. Accessed July 19, 2013. http://www.foxnews.com/story/2003/03/13/nader-scams-college-kids.html.
  3. Trevor LaFauci. “Before Bernie: How Ralph Nader Created a System to Exploit Young, Idealistic Progressives.” The Peoples View Blog. May 24, 2016. Accessed July 19, 2017. http://www.thepeoplesview.net/main/2016/5/24/naders-failure-how-the-public-interest-network-exploits-young-idealistic-progressives.
  4. Rosiak, Luke. “The Liberal Sweatshop.” The Daily Beast. July 15, 2009. Accessed July 19, 2017. http://www.thedailybeast.com/the-liberal-sweatshop.
  5. Jamieson, Dave. “Liberal Advocacy Group Comes Out Against Obama’s Big Overtime Rule.” Huffington Post. May 23, 2016. Accessed July 19, 2017. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/obama-overtime-rule_us_57431db8e4b045cc9a7178cd.
  6. Editors: Brobeck, Stephen & Mayer, Robert N. “Watchdogs and Whistleblowers: A Reference Guide to Consumer Activism.” Santa Barbara, California. Greenwood. 2015. Accessed July 19, 2017. https://books.google.com/books?id=uUUMCgAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false.
  7. Trevor LaFauci. “Before Bernie: How Ralph Nader Created a System to Exploit Young, Idealistic Progressives.” The Peoples View Blog. May 24, 2016. Accessed July 19, 2017. http://www.thepeoplesview.net/main/2016/5/24/naders-failure-how-the-public-interest-network-exploits-young-idealistic-progressives.
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  12. Editors: Brobeck, Stephen & Mayer, Robert N. “Watchdogs and Whistleblowers: A Reference Guide to Consumer Activism.” Santa Barbara, California. Greenwood. 2015. Accessed July 19, 2017. https://books.google.com/books?id=uUUMCgAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false.
  13. Editors: Brobeck, Stephen & Mayer, Robert N. “Watchdogs and Whistleblowers: A Reference Guide to Consumer Activism.” Santa Barbara, California. Greenwood. 2015. Accessed July 19, 2017. https://books.google.com/books?id=uUUMCgAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false.
  14. Scott, Janny. “Obama’s Account of New York Years Often Differs From What Others Say.” The New York Times. Oct. 30, 2007. Accessed July 19, 2017. http://www.nytimes.com/2007/10/30/us/politics/30obama.html?pagewanted=print.
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  19. Editors: Brobeck, Stephen & Mayer, Robert N. “Watchdogs and Whistleblowers: A Reference Guide to Consumer Activism.” Santa Barbara, California. Greenwood. 2015. Accessed July 19, 2017. https://books.google.com/books?id=uUUMCgAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false.
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  22. Editors: Brobeck, Stephen & Mayer, Robert N. “Watchdogs and Whistleblowers: A Reference Guide to Consumer Activism.” Santa Barbara, California. Greenwood. 2015. Accessed July 19, 2017. https://books.google.com/books?id=uUUMCgAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false.
  23. Editors: Brobeck, Stephen & Mayer, Robert N. “Watchdogs and Whistleblowers: A Reference Guide to Consumer Activism.” Santa Barbara, California. Greenwood. 2015. Accessed July 19, 2017. https://books.google.com/books?id=uUUMCgAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false.
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  25. “Lobbyists representing U.S. PIRG, 2012-2017” OpenSecrets, Center for Responsive Politics. 2012-2017. Accessed July 19, 2017. https://www.opensecrets.org/lobby/clientbills.php?id=D000058093&year=2017.
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  39. Mark Hemingway. “Barack’s PIRG Past.” National Review. September 16, 2008. Accessed July 19, 2017. http://www.nationalreview.com/article/225685/baracks-pirg-past-mark-hemingway.
  40. Mark Hemingway. “Barack’s PIRG Past.” National Review. September 16, 2008. Accessed July 19, 2017. http://www.nationalreview.com/article/225685/baracks-pirg-past-mark-hemingway.
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  43. Trevor LaFauci. “Before Bernie: How Ralph Nader Created a System to Exploit Young, Idealistic Progressives.” The Peoples View Blog. May 24, 2016. Accessed July 19, 2017. http://www.thepeoplesview.net/main/2016/5/24/naders-failure-how-the-public-interest-network-exploits-young-idealistic-progressives.
  44. Trevor LaFauci. “Before Bernie: How Ralph Nader Created a System to Exploit Young, Idealistic Progressives.” The Peoples View Blog. May 24, 2016. Accessed July 19, 2017. http://www.thepeoplesview.net/main/2016/5/24/naders-failure-how-the-public-interest-network-exploits-young-idealistic-progressives.
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  47. Editors: Brobeck, Stephen & Mayer, Robert N. “Watchdogs and Whistleblowers: A Reference Guide to Consumer Activism.” Santa Barbara, California. Greenwood. 2015. Accessed July 19, 2017. https://books.google.com/books?id=uUUMCgAAQBAJ&printsec=frontcover&source=gbs_ge_summary_r&cad=0#v=onepage&q&f=false.
  48. Trevor LaFauci. “Before Bernie: How Ralph Nader Created a System to Exploit Young, Idealistic Progressives.” The Peoples View Blog. May 24, 2016. Accessed July 19, 2017. http://www.thepeoplesview.net/main/2016/5/24/naders-failure-how-the-public-interest-network-exploits-young-idealistic-progressives.
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  51. Trevor LaFauci. “Before Bernie: How Ralph Nader Created a System to Exploit Young, Idealistic Progressives.” The Peoples View Blog. May 24, 2016. Accessed July 19, 2017. http://www.thepeoplesview.net/main/2016/5/24/naders-failure-how-the-public-interest-network-exploits-young-idealistic-progressives.
  52. Rosiak, Luke. “The Liberal Sweatshop.” The Daily Beast. July 15, 2009. Accessed July 19, 2017. http://www.thedailybeast.com/the-liberal-sweatshop.
  53. Rosiak, Luke. “The Liberal Sweatshop.” The Daily Beast. July 15, 2009. Accessed July 19, 2017. http://www.thedailybeast.com/the-liberal-sweatshop.
  54. Rosiak, Luke. “The Liberal Sweatshop.” The Daily Beast. July 15, 2009. Accessed July 19, 2017. http://www.thedailybeast.com/the-liberal-sweatshop.
  55. Delattre, Andre. “U.S. PIRG: Statement on the Overtime Rule.” U.S. PIRG. May 18, 2016. Accessed July 19, 2017. http://www.uspirg.org/news/usp/statement-overtime-rule.
  56. Higgins, Sean. “Liberal nonprofit federation opposes new overtime rule.” The Washington Examiner. May 23, 2016. Accessed July 19, 2017.

    http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/liberal-nonprofit-federation-opposes-new-overtime-rule/article/2592069.

  57. Jamieson, Dave. “Liberal Advocacy Group Comes Out Against Obama’s Big Overtime Rule.” Huffington Post. May 23, 2016. Accessed July 19, 2017. http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/obama-overtime-rule_us_57431db8e4b045cc9a7178cd.
  58. “This “Progressive” Non-profit Wants To Continue Exploiting Its Employees.” Medium Blog. May 23 , 2016. Accessed July 19, 2017. https://medium.com/@publicinterestprimer/this-progressive-non-profit-wants-to-continue-exploiting-its-employees-5b3819902bc4.
  59. “U.S. PIRG Staff: Andre Delattre.” U.S. PIRG. Undated. Accessed July 19, 2017. http://www.uspirg.org/staff/xxp/andre-delattre.
  60. “U.S. PIRG Staff: Douglas H. Phelps.” U.S. PIRG. Undated. Accessed July 19,2017. http://www.uspirg.org/staff/xxp/douglas-h-phelps.
  61. “Return of Organization Exempt from Income Tax: U.S. Public Interest Research Group.” Guidestar. 2014. Accessed July 18, 2017.  https://www.guidestar.org/profile/04-2790740.
  62. “U.S. PIRG: About Us: Staff.” U.S. PIRG. Archived Aug. 15, 2007. Accessed July 19, 2017. https://web.archive.org/web/20070815222123/http://uspirg.org:80/about-us/staff.

Directors, Employees & Supporters

  1. Gary Kalman
    Former Legislative Director (2005-2012)
  2. Sujatha Jahagirdar
    Program Director: "Stop Antibiotics Overuse"
  3. Adam Ruben
    Former National Field Director (1999-2002)
  4. David Rossini
    Vice President
  5. Ed Mierzwinski
    Board Member; Senior Director, Federal Consumer Program
  6. Marjorie Alt
    Former Executive Director (2006-2007)
  7. Wendy Wendlandt
    Former Political Director
  8. Janet Domenitz
    Board Member
  9. Faye Park
    President (2018-Present)
  10. Andre Delattre
    Executive Director
  11. Doug Phelps
    Board Chair
  12. Gene Karpinski
    Former Executive Director

Child Organizations

  1. Arizona Public Interest Research Group (Arizona PIRG) (Non-profit)
  2. Arizona Public Interest Research Group (Arizona PIRG) Education Fund (Non-profit)
  3. California Public Interest Research Group (CALPIRG) (Non-profit)
  4. California Public Interest Research Group (CALPIRG) Education Fund (Non-profit)
  5. Campus Organizing Support Services (Non-profit)
  6. Colorado Public Interest Research Group (CoPIRG) (Non-profit)
  7. Colorado Public Interest Research Group (CoPIRG) Foundation (Non-profit)
  8. Connecticut Public Interest Research Group (ConnPIRG Students) (Non-profit)
  9. Connecticut Public Interest Research Group (ConnPIRG) Citizen Lobby (Non-profit)
  10. Connecticut Public Interest Research Group (ConnPIRG) Education Fund (Non-profit)
  11. Environment America Research and Policy Center (Non-profit)
  12. Environmental Action (Non-profit)
  13. Florida Public Interest Research Group (Florida PIRG) Citizen Lobby (Non-profit)
  14. Florida Public Interest Research Group (Florida PIRG) Education Fund (Non-profit)
  15. Georgia Public Interest Research Group (Georgia PIRG) (Non-profit)
  16. Georgia Public Interest Research Group (Georgia PIRG) Education Fund (Non-profit)
  17. Green Century Capital Management (For-profit)
  18. Illinois Public Interest Research Group (Illinois PIRG) Education Fund (Non-profit)
  19. Illinois State Public Interest Research Group (Illinois PIRG) (Non-profit)
  20. Iowa Public Interest Research Group (Iowa PIRG) (Non-profit)
  21. Iowa Public Interest Research Group (Iowa PIRG) Education Fund (Non-profit)
  22. Maryland Public Interest Research Group (MaryPIRG) (Non-profit)
  23. Maryland Public Interest Research Group (MaryPIRG) Foundation (Non-profit)
  24. Massachusetts Public Interest Research Group (MASSPIRG) (Non-profit)
  25. Massachusetts Public Interest Research Group (MASSPIRG) Education Fund (Non-profit)
  26. Missouri Public Interest Research Group (MoPIRG) (Non-profit)
  27. Missouri Public Interest Research Group (MoPIRG) Foundation (Non-profit)
  28. Montana State Public Interest Research Group (MontPIRG) (Non-profit)
  29. New Hampshire Public Interest Research Group (NHPIRG) (Non-profit)
  30. New Hampshire Public Interest Research Group (NHPIRG) Education Fund (Non-profit)
  31. New Jersey Public Interest Research Group (NJPIRG) Citizen Lobby (Non-profit)
  32. New Mexico Public Interest Research Group (NMPIRG) Education Fund (Non-profit)
  33. New Mexico Public Interest Research Group (NMPIRG) Fund (Non-profit)
  34. New York Public Interest Research Group (NYPIRG) (Non-profit)
  35. North Carolina Public Interest Research Group (NCPIRG) Citizen Lobby (Non-profit)
  36. North Carolina Public Interest Research Group (NCPIRG) Education Fund (Non-profit)
  37. New York Public Interest Research Group (NYPIRG) Fund (Non-profit)
  38. Ohio Public Interest Research Group (Ohio PIRG) Citizen Lobby (Non-profit)
  39. Ohio Public Interest Research Group (Ohio PIRG) Education Fund (Non-profit)
  40. Oregon State Public Interest Research Group (OSPIRG) (Non-profit)
  41. Oregon State Public Interest Research Group (OSPIRG) Foundation (Non-profit)
  42. Pennsylvania Public Interest Research Group (PennPIRG) (Non-profit)
  43. Pennsylvania Public Interest Research Group (PennPIRG) Education Fund (Non-profit)
  44. Pesticide Watch (Non-profit)
  45. Pesticide Watch Education Fund (Non-profit)
  46. PIRG New Voters Project (Non-profit)
  47. Public Interest Research Group in Michigan (PIRGIM) Education Fund (Non-profit)
  48. Public Interest Research Group in Michigan (PIRGIM) Public Interest Lobby (Non-profit)
  49. Public Interest Research Foundation (NJPIRG) of New Jersey (Non-profit)
  50. Rhode Island Public Interest Research Group (RIPIRG) (Non-profit)
  51. Rhode Island Public Interest Research Group (RIPIRG) Education Fund (Non-profit)
  52. Student Organizing (Non-profit)
  53. Texas Public Interest Research Group (TEXPIRG) (Non-profit)
  54. Texas Public Interest Research Group (TEXPIRG) Education Fund (Non-profit)
  55. Toxics Action Center Campaigns (Non-profit)
  56. Washington Public Interest Research Group (WashPIRG) Foundation (Non-profit)
  57. Washington State Public Interest Research Group (WASHPIRG) (Non-profit)
  58. Washington State Public Interest Research Group (WashPIRG) (Non-profit)
  59. Washington State Public Interest Research Group (WASHPIRG) Foundation (Non-profit)
  60. Wisconsin Public Interest Research Group (WISPIRG) (Non-profit)
  61. Wisconsin Public Interest Research Group (WISPIRG) Foundation (Non-profit)
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Nonprofit Information

  • Accounting Period: June - May
  • Tax Exemption Received: December 1, 1984

  • Available Filings

    Period Form Type Total revenue Total functional expenses Total assets (EOY) Total liabilities (EOY) Unrelated business income? Total contributions Program service revenue Investment income Comp. of current officers, directors, etc. Form 990
    2015 Jun Form 990 $1,328,490 $1,048,376 $7,220,674 $1,735,219 N $1,187,686 $25,916 $8,729 $70,740 PDF
    2014 Jun Form 990 $1,473,459 $1,508,634 $5,590,658 $397,279 N $840,036 $495,769 $33,945 $63,477 PDF
    2013 Jun Form 990 $2,820,533 $2,436,825 $5,649,442 $420,888 N $2,446,339 $250,973 $2,924 $57,789 PDF
    2012 Jun Form 990 $2,102,961 $1,424,128 $5,434,433 $617,827 N $1,529,870 $416,793 $22,033 $64,284 PDF
    2011 Jun Form 990 $2,118,535 $1,785,524 $4,532,852 $390,523 N $1,049,952 $951,257 $7,208 $77,353 PDF

    Additional Filings (PDFs)

    U.S. Public Interest Research Group (US-PIRG)

    600 PENNSYLVANIA AVESE 4TH
    WASHINGTON, DC 20003-0000