Non-profit

Asia Society

Website:

asiasociety.org/

Location:

NEW YORK, NY

Tax ID:

13-3234632

Tax-Exempt Status:

501(c)(3)

Budget (2020):

Revenue: $31,036,163
Expenses: $31,588,582
Assets: $122,806,762

Formation:

1956

Type:

Foreign Policy Think Tank

Executive Director:

Kevin Rudd

Asia Society is a New York City-based international nonprofit with a focus on left-of-center topics such as sustainability [1] and climate policy in U.S.-Asia relations. [2] [3] Asia Society operates as a think tank and hosts two policy institutes, the Asia Society Policy Institute (ASPI) and the Center on U.S.-China Relations. [4] [5]

Since 2014, Asia Society has received grants of $938,700 from the Carnegie Corporation of New York; [6] $500,000 from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation; $335,000 from the Rockefeller Foundation; [7] $150,000 from the Hopewell Fund, which is managed by Arabella Advisors; [8] $150,000 from the Ford Foundation; [9] and $114,875 from the left-of-center Energy Foundation. [10] ASPI also receives support from foreign governments, Facebook, left-wing billionaire financier George Soros’s Open Society Foundations, and others. [11]

Asia Society is “committed” to the critical race theory-influenced principles of diversity, equity, and inclusion (DEI) in “all of its work and across its workplace.” [12] Asia Society’s Center for Global Education receives support from Chinese government-backed Confucius Institute Headquarters [13] and supports the critical race theory-influenced concept of “global social justice education.” [14]

History and Leadership

The Asia Society was founded in 1956 by John D. Rockefeller III to advance meaningful understanding between the United States and Asia. [15] In 2006, Asia Society founded the Center on U.S.-China Relations as a policy institute to focus on bilateral relations between the United States and China. [16]

Asia Society has offices in Hong Kong, [17] New York, [18] and Texas [19] and a global network with locations in Australia, France, India, Japan, Korea, the Philippines, Switzerland, Northern California, Southern California, and Washington, D.C. [20]

Former Australian Prime Minister Kevin Rudd is the President and CEO of Asia Society and the president of Asia Society Policy Institute. [21]

Former Obama administration deputy U.S. trade representative Wendy Cutler is the managing director of Asia Society’s Washington, D.C., office. [22] [23] [24]

Activities and Funding

Asia Society is an international nonprofit organization that operates as a think tank with a focus left-of-center topics such as sustainability policy [25] and climate policy in U.S.-Asia relations. [26] [27] Asia Society also hosts two policy institutes, the Asia Society Policy Institute and the Center on U.S.-China Relations. [28] [29] [30]

Asia Society is “committed” to the critical race theory-influenced principles of diversity, equity, and inclusion in “all of its work and across its workplace.” [31]

Following the violent protests associated with the Black Lives Matter movement in the summer of 2020, Asia Society said it would “begin uncomfortable dialogues about race and privilege” [32] and said it was looking at the NAACP, left-of-center Color of Change, and the ACLU as resources on these issues. [33]

In September 2020, Asia Society hosted an event titled “Standing Against Racism During COVID, Part II” which included an appearance from controversial 1619 Project founder Nikole Hannah-Jones. [34] Asia Society has also hosted events with left-wing billionaire and political donor George Soros [35] [36] [37] and co-hosted events with Soros’s Open Society Institute. [38]

Asia Society’s Center for Global Education receives support from the Chinese government-backed [39] Confucius Institute Headquarters [40] and supports the critical race theory-influenced concept of “global social justice education” in order to “ally with students to challenge systems of injustice and create hope” in career and technical education. [41] [42] The center’s director supports the far-left Black Lives Matter movement. [43]

The organization has said that Mandarin-language immersion students are “uniquely prepared” to address critical race theory-influenced issues including diversity, social justice, and racial justice. [44] In 2020, Asia Society made 77 grants to different educational institutions for instruction in Chinese languages. [45]

Funding

In 2020, Asia Society reported revenue of $31,036,163 and expenses of $31,588,582. [46] In 2020, Asia Society reported $21,918,173 on program expenses including $5,710,047 on art and cultural programs; $7,449,333 on the Asia Society Policy Institute; $4,126,266 on education and leadership activities; and $1,378,130 on U.S. Centers and Asian Activities. [47]

In 2019, Asia Society reported revenue of $35,257,295 and expenses of $32,724,478. [48]

In 2021, Asia Society received a $100,000 grant from the Thoma Foundation. [49] In 2020, Asia Society received $50,000 from Stanford University [50] and $10,000 the left-of-center San Francisco Foundation. [51] [52]

Asia Society received $144,558 from the left-of-center Ford Foundation; [53] $30,000 from Raymond James Charitable Endowment Fund; [54] and $20,000 from Goldman Sachs Philanthropy Fund in 2019. [55]

In 2018, Asia Society received a $150,000 grant from the left-of-center Hopewell Fund, which is administered by Arabella Advisors; [56] $150,000 grant from the Ford Foundation; [57] and $105,000 from Boston Foundation. [58]

Asia Society received $83,192 from the Jewish Communal Fund; [59] $55,000 from the Silicon Valley Community Foundation; [60] and $100,000 from the Ting Tsung and Wei Fong Chao Foundation in 2017. That same year the Ting Tsung and Wei Fong Chao Foundation also gave $200,000 to Asia Society Global New York and $1,000,000 to Asia Society Texas Center. [61] Asia Society also received  $300,000 from the left-of-center Charles Stewart Mott Foundation [62] and $500,000 from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation in 2016. [63]

In 2015, Asia Society received $335,000 from the Rockefeller Foundation; [64]  $200,000 from the Carnegie Corporation of New York; [65] and $114,875 from the left-of-center Energy Foundation. [66] In 2014, Asia Society received $938,700 from the Carnegie Corporation of New York; [67] $200,000 from the Robert and Kate Niehaus Foundation; [68] and $100,000 from the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation. [69] Asia Society also received a $750,000 grant from the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation in 2007. [70]

The Asia Society Policy Institute receives support from the Australian government, Carnegie Corporation of New York, Dalio Philanthropies, Facebook, Ford Foundation, General Atlantic Foundation, Korea Foundation, John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Japanese Government, George Soros’s Open Society Foundations, Pfizer, the Rockefeller Foundation, the Sage Foundation, and others. [71] [72]

Asia Society’s Center for Global Education is supported by the U.S. Department of Education, Carnegie Corporation of New York, Confucius Institute Headquarters, Ford Foundation, Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, Goldman Sachs Foundation, William and Flora Hewlett Foundation, J.P. Morgan Chase Foundation, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Fo]undation, Medtronic Foundation, critical race theory-aligned Nellie Mae Education Foundation, and others. [73]

References

  1. “Sustainability.” Asia Society Policy Institute. Accessed August 28, 2022. https://asiasociety.org/policy-institute/sustainability. ^
  2. “The Climate Fight Under President-Elect Trump.” Asia Society Policy Institute. Accessed August 28, 2022. https://asiasociety.org/policy-institute/climate-fight-under-president-elect-trump. ^
  3. “A Partnership to Save the Planet: Rebuilding U.S.-China Climate Cooperation.” Asia Society Policy Institute. Accessed August 28, 2022. https://asiasociety.org/policy-institute/us-china-climate. ^
  4. The Climate Fight Under President-Elect Trump.” Asia Society Policy Institute. Accessed August 28, 2022. https://asiasociety.org/policy-institute/climate-fight-under-president-elect-trump. ^
  5. “A Partnership to Save the Planet: Rebuilding U.S.-China Climate Cooperation.” Asia Society Policy Institute. Accessed August 28, 2022. https://asiasociety.org/policy-institute/us-china-climate. ^
  6. “Carnegie Corporation of New York.” Return of Private Foundation. (Form 990-PF). 2014. Part XV. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/organizations/131628151/201602179349100510/IRS990PF. ^
  7. The Rockefeller Foundation.” Return of Private Foundation. (Form 990-PF). 2015. Part XV. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/organizations/131659629/201633199349100638/IRS990PF. ^
  8. “Hopewell Fund.” Return of Organization Exempt From Income Tax. (Form 990). 2018. Schedule I. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/organizations/473681860/201913169349302346/full. ^
  9. “The Ford Foundation.” Return of Private Foundation. (Form 990-PF). 2018. Part XV. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/organizations/131684331/201913199349101266/IRS990PF. ^
  10. “The Energy Foundation.” Return of Organization Exempt From Income Tax. (Form 990). 2015. Schedule I. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/organizations/943126848/201732269349301908/full. ^
  11. “Our Supporters. “Asia Society Center for Global Education. Accessed August 28, 2022. https://asiasociety.org/education/our-supporters. ^
  12. “About Asia Society.” Asia Society. Accessed August 25, 2022. https://asiasociety.org/about. ^
  13. “Our Supporters. “Asia Society Center for Global Education. Accessed August 28, 2022. https://asiasociety.org/education/our-supporters. ^
  14.  “Global Social Justice Education Framework for CTE Programs.” Asia Society Center for Global Education. Accessed August 28, 2022. https://asiasociety.org/sites/default/files/inline-files/Global_Social_Justice_Framework.pdf. ^
  15. “Asia Society Inclusion and Diversity.” Asia Society. Accessed August 25, 2022. https://asiasociety.org/about/asia-society-inclusion-and-diversity. ^
  16. “About.” Asia Society Center on U.S.-China Relations. Accessed August 29, 2022. https://asiasociety.org/center-us-china-relations/about. ^
  17. “Hong Kong.” Asia Society. Accessed August 26, 2022. https://asiasociety.org/hong-kong. ^
  18. “New York.” Asia Society. Accessed August 26, 2022. https://asiasociety.org/new-york. ^
  19. “ About Us.” Asia Society Texas. Accessed August 25, 2022. https://asiasociety.org/texas/about-us. ^
  20. “About Asia Society.” Asia Society. Accessed August 25, 2022. https://asiasociety.org/about. ^
  21. “Senior Leadership.” Asia Society. Accessed August 24, 2022. https://asiasociety.org/about/senior-leadership. ^
  22. “Senior Leadership.” Asia Society. Accessed August 24, 2022. https://asiasociety.org/about/senior-leadership. ^
  23. “Wendy Cutler.” Foreign Policy. Accessed August 24, 2022. https://foreignpolicy.com/author/wendy-cutler/. ^
  24. “What the Trans-Pacific Partnership Was Originally Constructed For.” National Public Radio. April 13, 2018. Accessed August 28, 2022. https://www.npr.org/2018/04/13/602288687/what-the-trans-pacific-partnership-was-originally-constructed-for. ^
  25. “Sustainability.” Asia Society Policy Institute. Accessed August 28, 2022. https://asiasociety.org/policy-institute/sustainability. ^
  26. “The Climate Fight Under President-Elect Trump.” Asia Society Policy Institute. Accessed August 28, 2022. https://asiasociety.org/policy-institute/climate-fight-under-president-elect-trump. ^
  27. “A Partnership to Save the Planet: Rebuilding U.S.-China Climate Cooperation.” Asia Society Policy Institute. Accessed August 28, 2022. https://asiasociety.org/policy-institute/us-china-climate. ^
  28. “About ASPI.” Asia Society Policy Institute. Accessed August 29, 2022. https://asiasociety.org/policy-institute/about. ^
  29. “Center on U.S.-China Relations.” Asia Society. Accessed August 28, 2022. https://asiasociety.org/policy-institute/center-china-analysis. ^
  30. “Homepage.” ChinaFile. Accessed August 28, 2022. https://www.chinafile.com/. ^
  31. “About Asia Society.” Asia Society. Accessed August 25, 2022. https://asiasociety.org/about. ^
  32. “Asia Society Tweet.” Asia Society Twitter. Posted June 1, 2020. Accessed August 28, 2022. https://twitter.com/asiasociety/status/1267568852721979393?s=21&t=W4YUi8qJjZ5w2nzTvYfhnw. ^
  33. Asia Society Tweet.” Asia Society Twitter. Posted June 1, 2020. Accessed August 28, 2022. https://twitter.com/asiasociety/status/1267570055098793985?s=21&t=W4YUi8qJjZ5w2nzTvYfhnw. ^
  34. “Standing Against Racism in the Time of COVID (Part II).” Asia Society. September 2, 2020. Accessed August 28, 2022. https://asiasociety.org/southern-california/events/standing-against-racism-time-covid-part-ii. ^
  35. “George Soros: ‘I Consider Myself as Typhoid Mary’ in China.” Asia Society Video. April 30, 2015. Accessed August 26, 2022. https://asiasociety.org/video/george-soros-i-consider-myself-typhoid-mary-china. ^
  36. “When Societies Open: The Global Philanthropic Footprint of George Soros.” Asia Society Luncheon. Asia Society New York. April 30, 2015. Accessed August 26, 2022. https://asiasociety.org/new-york/events/when-societies-open-global-philanthropic-footprint-george-soros. ^
  37. Fish, Eric. “George Soros: ‘Eerie Resemblance’ Between China Now and Pre-Financial Crisis U.S.” Asia Society. April 22, 2016. Accessed August 26, 2022. https://asiasociety.org/blog/asia/george-soros-eerie-resemblance-between-china-now-and-pre-financial-crisis-us. ^
  38. “Deepening Democracy in Southeast Asia.” Open Society Foundations. April 6, 2005. Accessed August 28, 2022. https://www.opensocietyfoundations.org/events/deepening-democracy-southeast-asia. ^
  39. Nunley, Christian. “Senate approves bill to tighten controls on China-funded Confucius Institutes on U.S. university campuses.” CNBC. March 5, 2021. Accessed August 29, 2022. https://www.cnbc.com/2021/03/05/us-senate-approves-bill-against-china-funded-confucius-institutes.html. ^
  40. “Our Supporters. “Asia Society Center for Global Education. Accessed August 28, 2022. https://asiasociety.org/education/our-supporters. ^
  41. “Global Social Justice Education Framework for CTE Programs.” Asia Society Center for Global Education. Accessed August 28, 2022. https://asiasociety.org/sites/default/files/inline-files/Global_Social_Justice_Framework.pdf. ^
  42. “Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion.” Asia Society Center for Global Education. Accessed August 28, 2022. https://asiasociety.org/education/diversity-equity-and-inclusion. ^
  43. Jackson, Tony. “Education’s Role in Eliminating Racism: Commitments from Asia Society.” Asia Society Center for Global Education. Accessed August 28, 2022. https://asiasociety.org/education/educations-role-eliminating-racism-commitments-asia-society. ^
  44. “Connecting Language with Social Justice and Change.” Asia Society China Learning Initiatives. Accessed August 28, 2022. https://asiasociety.org/china-learning-initiatives/connecting-language-learning-social-justice-and-change. ^
  45.  “Asia Society.” Return of Organization Exempt From Income Tax. (Form 990). 2020. Schedule I. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/organizations/133234632/202100649349301800/full. ^
  46. “The Asia Society.” Return of Organization Exempt From Income Tax. (Form 990). 2019. Part I. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/organizations/133234632/202100649349301800/full. ^
  47. “Asia Society.” Return of Organization Exempt From Income Tax. (Form 990). 2020. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/organizations/133234632/202100649349301800/full. ^
  48. “The Asia Society.” Return of Organization Exempt From Income Tax. (Form 990). 2019. Part I. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/organizations/133234632/202100649349301800/full. ^
  49. “Asia Society Texas Center.” Thoma Foundation. 2021. Accessed August 28, 2022. https://grants.thomafoundation.org/previous-recipients/asia-society-texas-center/. ^
  50.  “The Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University.” Return of Organization Exempt From Income Tax. (Form 990). 2020. Schedule I. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/organizations/941156365/202101959349302120/full. ^
  51. “San Francisco Foundation.” Return of Organization Exempt From income Tax. (Form 990). 2020. Schedule I. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/organizations/10679337/202141369349301959/full ^
  52. “San Francisco Foundation.” Return of Organization Exempt From Income Tax. (Form 990). 2016. Schedule I. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/organizations/10679337/201701239349302010/IRS990ScheduleI. ^
  53. “The Ford Foundation.” Return of Private Foundation. (Form 990-PF). 2019. Part XV. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/organizations/131684331/202023189349104072/IRS990PF. ^
  54. “Raymond James Charitable Endowment Fund.” Return of Organization Exempt from Income Tax. (Form 990). 2019. Schedule I. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/organizations/593652538/202030089349300813/full. ^
  55. “Goldman Sachs Philanthropy Fund.” Return of Organization Exempt From Income Tax. (Form 990). 2019. Schedule I. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/organizations/311774905/202022189349300322/IRS990ScheduleI. ^
  56. [1] “Hopewell Fund.” Return of Organization Exempt From Income Tax. (Form 990). 2018. Schedule I. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/organizations/473681860/201913169349302346/full. ^
  57. “The Ford Foundation.” Return of Private Foundation. (Form 990-PF). 2018. Part XV. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/organizations/131684331/201913199349101266/IRS990PF. ^
  58. “Boston Foundation Inc.” Return of Organization Exempt From Income Tax. (Form 990). 2017. Schedule I. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/organizations/42104021/201931369349300728/full. ^
  59. “Jewish Communal Fund.” Return of Organization Exempt From Income Tax (Form 990). 2017. Schedule I. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/organizations/237174183/201830329349300208/IRS990ScheduleI. ^
  60. “Silicon Valley Community Foundation.” Return of Organization Exempt From Income Tax. (Form 990). 2017. Schedule I. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/organizations/205205488/201843199349319564/IRS990ScheduleI. ^
  61. “Ting Tsung and Wei Fong Chao Foundation.” Return of Private Foundation. (Form 990-PF). 2017. Part XV. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/organizations/300005201/201803199349104785/full. ^
  62. “Charles Stewart Mott Foundation.” Return of Private Foundation. (Form 990-PF). Part XV. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/organizations/381211227/201743039349100209/IRS990PF. ^
  63. “John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Consolidated.” Return of Private Foundation. (Form 990-PF). 2016. Part XV. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/organizations/237093598/201733199349101673/IRS990PF ^
  64. “The Rockefeller Foundation.” Return of Private Foundation. (Form 990-PF). 2015. Part XV. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/organizations/131659629/201633199349100638/IRS990PF. ^
  65. “Asia Society Selected for Carnegie Corporation Grant.” Asia Society. May 6, 22015. Accessed August 28, 2022. https://asiasociety.org/asia-society-selected-carnegie-corporation-grant. ^
  66. “The Energy Foundation.” Return of Organization Exempt From Income Tax. (Form 990). 2015. Schedule I. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/organizations/943126848/201732269349301908/full ^
  67. “Carnegie Corporation of New York.” Return of Private Foundation. (Form 990-PF). 2014. Part XV. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/organizations/131628151/201602179349100510/IRS990PF. ^
  68. “Robert and Kate Niehaus Foundation.” Return of Private Foundation. (Form 990-PF). 2014. Part XV. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/organizations/134007527/201543149349100009/full. ^
  69. “William & Flora Hewlett Foundation.” Return of Private Foundation. (Form 990-PF). 2015. Part XV. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/organizations/941655673/201633079349100928/IRS990PF. ^
  70. “Asia Society.” Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. January 1, 2007. Accessed August 28, 2022. https://www.ddcf.org/grants/what-weve-funded/Grant-Recipients/Asia-Society-. ^
  71. “Supporters.” Asia Society Policy Institute. Accessed August 26, 2022. https://asiasociety.org/policy-institute/supporters. ^
  72. “George Soros: Open Societies, Sovereignty, and International Terrorism.” Asia Society. September 19, 2001. Accessed August 28, 2022. https://asiasociety.org/george-soros-open-societies-sovereignty-and-international-terrorism. ^
  73. [1] “Our Supporters. “Asia Society Center for Global Education. Accessed August 28, 2022. https://asiasociety.org/education/our-supporters. ^

Directors, Employees & Supporters

  1. Elizabeth Sherwood-Randall
    Policy Advisory Board Member

Donor Organizations

  1. Hopewell Fund (Non-profit)
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Nonprofit Information

  • Accounting Period: June - May
  • Tax Exemption Received: August 1, 1985

  • Available Filings

    Period Form Type Total revenue Total functional expenses Total assets (EOY) Total liabilities (EOY) Unrelated business income? Total contributions Program service revenue Investment income Comp. of current officers, directors, etc. Form 990
    2020 Jun Form 990 $31,036,163 $31,588,582 $122,806,762 $25,073,865 N $25,220,431 $993,600 $660,720 $3,381,941 PDF
    2019 Jun Form 990 $35,257,295 $32,724,478 $124,467,823 $21,794,739 N $30,162,146 $1,969,688 $699,501 $3,552,502 PDF
    2018 Jun Form 990 $37,534,946 $30,855,209 $119,347,039 $20,495,704 N $30,519,057 $1,342,013 $599,189 $3,553,680 PDF
    2017 Jun Form 990 $33,481,077 $31,773,102 $110,380,858 $21,009,254 N $28,797,534 $1,622,442 $605,410 $3,888,535 PDF
    2016 Jun Form 990 $31,371,402 $33,872,871 $100,565,943 $22,368,075 N $24,447,612 $1,880,270 $872,520 $3,758,560
    2015 Jun Form 990 $29,391,983 $31,401,072 $112,903,540 $21,346,060 N $22,443,429 $1,520,342 $824,046 $3,032,668 PDF
    2014 Jun Form 990 $35,390,735 $29,621,738 $118,296,013 $21,699,008 N $29,307,075 $1,793,118 $774,349 $2,797,480 PDF
    2013 Jun Form 990 $28,517,478 $28,602,368 $102,736,271 $22,225,141 N $21,915,658 $2,234,704 $750,662 $1,763,061 PDF
    2012 Jun Form 990 $24,331,594 $30,745,615 $98,303,024 $24,528,322 Y $17,872,845 $2,950,616 $633,695 $2,033,799 PDF
    2011 Jun Form 990 $19,397,930 $25,850,094 $107,735,174 $23,362,998 Y $15,220,021 $1,176,039 $592,812 $2,054,745 PDF

    Additional Filings (PDFs)

    Asia Society

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