Non-profit

Women’s March Network

Website:

womensmarchnetwork.org/

Location:

Brooklyn, NY

Tax ID:

86-3322891

Tax-Exempt Status:

501(c)(3)

Formation:

2018

Executive Director:

Rachel O’Leary Carmona

Women’s March Network is a feminist activist group that purports to represent the global “women’s march” movement. [1] It was a project of NEO Philanthropy before becoming a standalone organization. [2]

The group activates women to participate in the women’s march movement, and has also called on women to protest against former President Donald Trump’s immigration policies, gun violence, “white nationalism,” and the January 6, 2021 protest and riot at the U.S. Capitol. [3]

Background

According to IRS filings, Women’s March Network was officially designated as a tax-exempt entity in April 2021. [4] Before becoming a standalone organization, the group was a fiscally-sponsored project of NEO Philanthropy, a left-of-center nonprofit incubator. [5] When it was launched, the group’s stated mission was to register voters and encourage civic participation among women in the United States. [6]

According to Tablet Mag, NEO Philanthropy started the group without consulting with Women’s March leaders or organizations. This, along with other developments in the wider Women’s March movement, led critics to allege that donations were being misappropriated and that the group was improperly profiting from the publicity around the women’s march movement. [7]

Programs

Women’s March Network hosts programs to organize its members and employ them in activist campaigns. One of them, Women’s Agenda, was a list of policy demands released in 2019 to unite the movement around a concrete set of key “intersectional” legislative priorities. These included “ending state violence,” “reproductive rights & justice,” rights for marginalized groups, “economic justice & workers’ rights,” and “environmental justice.” The Agenda was developed by a team of left-progressive policy strategists from organizes like the American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU), AFL-CIO, the American Federation of Teachers (AFT), the Astraea Lesbian Foundation for Justice, Planned Parenthood, Pueblo Action Alliance, and Sierra Club. [8]

Another program is Digital Defenders, which encourages members to fight “disinformation” and “alt-right trolls” on social media by spreading “truth” and “uniting people over shared values that will bring us closer to progress.” Women-2-Women Circles, a volunteer-led program, seeks to aid activists in recruiting “five or more friends and family” to organize “other women in their own communities.” [9]

Leadership

Rachel O’Leary Carmona is the executive director of Women’s March Network. She was the chief operating officer of the Network for about three years before becoming director. A recognized organizer and networker within the left-progressive movement, Carmona has been involved with Amnesty International USA, the Gay & Lesbian Alliance Against Defamation (GLAAD), and Women for Women International. She has also worked with Girl Scouts of the USA, Wisconsin Public Television, and the mayors of Memphis, Tennessee and Somerville, Massachusetts. [10]

Organizing director Kate Shapiro is a former organizer with Southerners on New Ground (SONG), a “grassroots multi-racial LGBTQ” group based in the South. She has also worked with the SEIU, the Beehive Design Collective, Spark Reproductive Justice Now, and the Center for Participatory Change. She is on the advisory council of Kindred Southern Healing Justice Collective and the Georgia Citizens Coalition on Hunger. [11]

Brianna Twofoot, the national organizing director of Planned Parenthood Federation of America, is the president of the board. She has previously worked as the chief program officer of the National Institute for Reproductive Health and as the vice president of organizing at Leadership for Educational Equity. Other board members include Tamara Cohen, the vice president of program strategy at Moving Traditions; T. Sheri Dickerson, a political consultant and strategist for left-progressive Oklahoma candidates through her firm Epiphany Consulting; Shawna Knipper, a former digital organizer for Sen. Bernie Sanders’ (I-VT) 2020 presidential campaign; and Isa Noyola, the deputy director of “Latinx and Chicanx organizing” group Mijente. [12]

References

  1. “Home – Join the Movement.” Women’s March Network. Accessed April 24, 2022. https://womensmarchnetwork.org/. ^
  2. [1] “NEO Philanthropy’s New Fiscally Sponsored Projects Provide Support to Headline-Making Issues.” NEO Philanthropy. March 1, 2018. Accessed April 25, 2022. https://neophilanthropy.org/neo-philanthropys-new-fiscally-sponsored-projects-provide-support-headline-making-issues/. ^
  3. “Home – Join the Movement.” Women’s March Network. Accessed April 24, 2022. https://womensmarchnetwork.org/. ^
  4. “Determination Letter – Women’s March Network.” Internal Revenue Service. December 20, 2021. Accessed April 25, 2022. ^
  5. “NEO Philanthropy’s New Fiscally Sponsored Projects Provide Support to Headline-Making Issues.” NEO Philanthropy, 1 March 2018. Accessed April 25, 2022. https://neophilanthropy.org/neo-philanthropys-new-fiscally-sponsored-projects-provide-support-headline-making-issues/. ^
  6. “NEO Philanthropy’s New Fiscally Sponsored Projects Provide Support to Headline-Making Issues.” NEO Philanthropy. March 1, 2018. Accessed April 25, 2022. https://neophilanthropy.org/neo-philanthropys-new-fiscally-sponsored-projects-provide-support-headline-making-issues/. ^
  7. McSweeny, Leah and Siegel, Jacob. “Is the Women’s March Melting Down?” Table Mag. December 10, 2018. Accessed April 25, 2022. https://www.tabletmag.com/sections/news/articles/is-the-womens-march-melting-down. ^
  8.  “Women’s Agenda.” Women’s March Network. Accessed April 24, 2022. https://womensmarchnetwork.org/programs/womens-agenda/. ^
  9. “Programs.” Women’s March Network. Accessed April 24, 2022. https://womensmarchnetwork.org/programs/. ^
  10. Our Team.” Women’s March Network. Accessed April 24, 2022. https://womensmarchnetwork.org/about/. ^
  11.  “Our Team.” Women’s March Network. Accessed April 24, 2022. https://womensmarchnetwork.org/about/. ^
  12. “Our Team.” Women’s March Network. Accessed April 24, 2022. https://womensmarchnetwork.org/about/. ^
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Nonprofit Information

  • Accounting Period: December - November
  • Tax Exemption Received: December 1, 2021

  • Available Filings

    No filings available.

    Women’s March Network

    400 Jay Street # 231
    Brooklyn, NY