Non-profit

National Center for Family Philanthropy

Website:

www.ncfp.org/

Location:

Washington, DC

Tax ID:

52-2055016

Tax-Exempt Status:

501(c)(3)

Budget (2019):

Revenue: $3,985,324
Expenses: $3,101,678
Assets: $3,007,788

Formation:

1997

President & CEO:

Nick A. Tedesco

The National Center for Family Philanthropy is an organization that acts as a network for families engaged in left-of-center philanthropic giving guided by a shared goal to make the world more “resilient” and “equitable.” The Center works to provide its members with information on prospective organizations to support and to provide members with resources that will enable them to find other organizations they approve of “so communities truly benefit” from their giving. 1

To this end the Center hosts programs and services in the form of webinars and peer networks to inform its members on new giving opportunities and strategies. It collects its advice and consultation on decision making into a system it calls “the Family Giving Lifecycle.” 2 The Center also promotes the benefits of private philanthropy to the general public. 3

Its major partners and funders include many left-of-center foundations and donor networks. 4 5

Background

The National Center for Family Philanthropy was founded in 1997 by a group of families with the idea that family philanthropy, the largest category of organized philanthropy in the United States, needed a separate center for support and encouragement. 6

Activities

Programs

One of the major practices of the Center is providing informational programs to its members and to the public. Its monthly “Fundamentals of Family Philanthropy” webinar series covers topics like grantmaking, succession, organizational governance, and motivation. It also hosts a series of webinars called “Community Conversations” where philanthropic “experts” offer strategies and recommendations to attending members. 7

Its Learning and Action Networks (LANs), educational courses on topics related to philanthropic giving, require attendees to commit to defined funding actions after the course is finished. Its “Salons” are similar, where members of family giving organizations meet to discuss central themes and concepts. 8

The Center offers a list of hands-on services where staff members consult with nonprofits and foundations on specific activities and granting initiatives. 9

The Family Giving Lifecycle

One of the main programs the Center hosts is the Family Giving Lifecycle. The Lifecycle boils down the key areas where philanthropies need to focus in order to successfully achieve their missions and objectives. It offers advice on governance, funding strategies, operations and management, and the promotion of younger family members to leading roles. 10

Partners

The Center additionally works to connect its family philanthropy members to its “Partners,” a group of over two dozen funding networks to help facilitate its members’ giving to the networks’ subsidiary nonprofit groups. Major partners include Arabella Advisors, the Bridgespan Group, Candid, the Center for Effective Philanthropy, the Council on Foundations, Giving Compass, Grantmakers for Effective Organizations, Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors, and the Whitman Institute. 11

Funding

The National Center for Family Philanthropy claims to be supported by more than 350 foundations and groups these foundations into its “Learning Network” for philanthropic families. 12

Major funders include the Arthur M. Blank Family Foundation, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the Charles Stewart Mott Foundation, the David and Lucile Packard Foundation, the Duchossis Family Foundation, the Evelyn & Walter Haas Jr. Fund, the Ford Foundation, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the Libra Foundation, MacKenzie Scott (ex-wife of Amazon founder Jeff Bezos), the McKnight Foundation, Schwab Charitable, the Surdna Foundation, the Walton Family Foundation, and the Wyncote Foundation. 13

In December 2004, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation’s Global Policy and Advocacy division gave the National Center for Family Philanthropy a $400,000 grant to “support efforts to strengthen the structure of the philanthropic sector.” 14

The Center’s “Leadership Circle” includes several of the organizations and people listed above as well as the Oak Foundation, the Walter & Elise Haas Fund, and many others. 15

Leadership

Former president Virginia Esposito had previously been a vice president at the Council on Foundations. 16

Nick A. Tedesco became the president of the National Center for Family Philanthropy in December 2019. 17 Before joining the Center, Tedesco worked as a senior advisor in the J.P. Morgan Philanthropy Centre and a relationship manager at the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation where he helped establish the Giving Pledge initiative. 18

Tom Lambeth, at the time the executive director of the Z. Smith Reynolds Foundation, was named the first chairman of the Center board. 19 As of February 2022, the Center’s chair was occupied by Kelly Nowlin, a member of the Andrus family and longtime board member of the Surdna Foundation. 20

References

  1. “About the National Center for Family Philanthropy.” The National Center for Family Philanthropy. Accessed 7 February 2022. https://www.ncfp.org/about-us/.
  2. “About the National Center for Family Philanthropy.” The National Center for Family Philanthropy. Accessed 7 February 2022. https://www.ncfp.org/about-us/.
  3. “National Center for Family Philanthropy.” Philanthropy News Digest, 6 November 2001. Accessed 7 February 2022. https://philanthropynewsdigest.org/npo-spotlight/national-center-for-family-philanthropy.
  4. “Our Funders.” The National Center for Family Philanthropy. Accessed 7 February 2022. https://www.ncfp.org/about-us/who-we-are/our-funders/.
  5. “Our Partners.” The National Center for Family Philanthropy. Accessed 7 February 2022. https://www.ncfp.org/about-us/who-we-are/our-partners/.
  6. “National Center for Family Philanthropy.” Philanthropy News Digest, 6 November 2001. Accessed 7 February 2022. https://philanthropynewsdigest.org/npo-spotlight/national-center-for-family-philanthropy.
  7. “Programs and Services Overview.” The National Center for Family Philanthropy. Accessed 7 February 2022. https://www.ncfp.org/programs-and-services-overview/.
  8. “Programs and Services Overview.” The National Center for Family Philanthropy. Accessed 7 February 2022. https://www.ncfp.org/programs-and-services-overview/.
  9. “Programs and Services Overview.” The National Center for Family Philanthropy. Accessed 7 February 2022. https://www.ncfp.org/programs-and-services-overview/.
  10. “The Family Giving Lifecycle.” The National Center for Family Philanthropy. Accessed 7 February 2022. https://www.ncfp.org/knowledge-center/the-family-giving-lifecycle/.
  11. “Our Partners.” The National Center for Family Philanthropy. Accessed 7 February 2022. https://www.ncfp.org/about-us/who-we-are/our-partners/.
  12. “Our Funders.” The National Center for Family Philanthropy. Accessed 7 February 2022. https://www.ncfp.org/about-us/who-we-are/our-funders/.
  13. “Our Funders.” The National Center for Family Philanthropy. Accessed 7 February 2022. https://www.ncfp.org/about-us/who-we-are/our-funders/.
  14. “Committed Grants – National Center for Family Philanthropy.” Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. Accessed 7 February 2022. https://www.gatesfoundation.org/about/committed-grants/2004/12/opp36833.
  15. “Our Funders.” The National Center for Family Philanthropy. Accessed 7 February 2022. https://www.ncfp.org/about-us/who-we-are/our-funders/.
  16. “National Center for Family Philanthropy.” Philanthropy News Digest, 6 November 2001. Accessed 7 February 2022. https://philanthropynewsdigest.org/npo-spotlight/national-center-for-family-philanthropy.
  17. [1] Return of Organization Exempt from Income Tax (2019 Form 990). National Center for Family Philanthropy Inc. Part VII.
  18. “Nicholas A. Tedesco.” National Center for Family Philanthropy. Accessed 7 February 2022. https://www.ncfp.org/people/nicholas-a-tedesco/.
  19.  “National Center for Family Philanthropy.” Philanthropy News Digest, 6 November 2001. Accessed 7 February 2022. https://philanthropynewsdigest.org/npo-spotlight/national-center-for-family-philanthropy.
  20. [1] “Kelly Nowlin.” National Center for Family Philanthropy. Accessed 7 February 2022. https://www.ncfp.org/people/kelly-nowlin/.
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Nonprofit Information

  • Accounting Period: December - November
  • Tax Exemption Received: May 1, 1998

  • Available Filings

    Period Form Type Total revenue Total functional expenses Total assets (EOY) Total liabilities (EOY) Unrelated business income? Total contributions Program service revenue Investment income Comp. of current officers, directors, etc. Form 990
    2019 Dec Form 990 $3,985,324 $3,101,678 $3,007,788 $545,189 N $2,729,870 $1,254,403 $1,557 $707,832 PDF
    2018 Dec Form 990 $2,647,213 $2,646,355 $2,102,516 $523,563 Y $1,997,002 $642,432 $724 $713,119 PDF
    2017 Dec Form 990 $2,597,425 $2,580,681 $2,092,785 $514,690 N $1,715,734 $859,551 $2,068 $692,172 PDF
    2016 Dec Form 990 $2,959,326 $1,891,460 $2,021,517 $460,166 N $2,557,805 $399,851 $414 $634,036
    2015 Dec Form 990 $1,890,170 $2,169,967 $1,027,143 $533,658 N $1,078,825 $808,008 $506 $281,202 PDF
    2014 Dec Form 990 $1,651,673 $1,786,843 $1,032,646 $259,364 N $975,981 $689,799 $646 $448,377 PDF
    2013 Dec Form 990 $1,769,292 $1,356,431 $1,135,728 $227,276 N $1,479,682 $161,015 $217 $215,386 PDF
    2012 Dec Form 990 $1,366,342 $1,332,008 $638,380 $143,133 N $1,174,430 $69,623 $431 $186,695 PDF
    2011 Dec Form 990 $1,505,832 $1,074,331 $595,348 $134,435 N $1,279,750 $134,813 $67 $175,915 PDF

    Additional Filings (PDFs)

    National Center for Family Philanthropy

    1667 K Street, NW, Suite 550
    Washington, DC