Non-profit

Council of State Community Development Agencies (COSCDA)

Website:

www.coscda.org

Location:

Washington, DC

Tax ID:

39-1211513

Tax-Exempt Status:

501(c)(3)

Budget (2020):

Revenue: $674,248
Expenses: $700,070
Assets: $853,106

Type:

Nonprofit association of state housing and development agencies

Founded:

1974

Executive Director:

Dianne Taylor

The Council of State Community Development Agencies (COSCDA) is a nonprofit association comprised of community development agencies from U.S. states, Puerto Rico, and the District of Columbia. 1 COSCDA promotes increased funding of federal community development programs and U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) grant programs. COSCDA provides advocacy at the federal level, and training and conferences to state agencies.

COSCDA opposed Obama administration regulations that included equity in certain HUD grants, citing unintended consequences of shifting grant funding from areas that need assistance to other regional areas to promote equity. COSCDA has supported increased funding of the Community Development Block Grants (CDBG) Program, arguing the program provides 95 percent of its funding to low- and moderate-income neighborhoods.

History

The Council of State Community Development Agencies was formed in 1974 as the Council of State Community Affairs Agencies. 2 The organization changed its name effective fall 1990. 3 Since inception, COSCDA promotes the interests of state agencies focusing on community development, housing, homelessness, local economic development, disaster recovery, and state-local relations. 4

Organization

The Council of State Community Development Agencies membership consists of executive branch agencies from U.S. states, Puerto Rico, and the District of Columbia with each having one vote per state or territory. 5 COSCDA’s board of directors consists of four members, one from each U.S. geographic region. 6

Activities

The Council of State Community Development Agencies represents state agencies responsible for administering federal Department of Housing and Urban Development programs including the Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) Program, the HOME Investment Partnerships (HOME), homeless assistance programs, and the Housing Trust Fund (HTF). 7 COSCDA holds training conferences and events, provides federal legislative and regulatory updates for its members, and consults with Congress and the executive branch regarding legislation and regulations. 8

Community Development Block Grants

Community Development Block Grants began by the federal government in 1974 with an initial appropriation of $2.4 billion. 9 Between FY2001 and FY2021, CDBG funding has decreased from $4.4 billion to $3.475 billion. 10 COSCDA has recommended funding for the CDBG program at $4.2 billion annually. 11 Over 1,200 jurisdictions receive Community Development Block Grants and an additional 7,200 communities have access to funds. 12

A study found that over 95 percent of CDBG funds assist neighborhoods of low to moderate income, every $1 grant investment provides $4.09 in private and public additional funding, and since 2000 CDBGs have created or retained over 1.9 million jobs. 13 To be eligible for Community Development Block Grants, applicants must show it will primarily benefit low- and moderate-income (LMI) persons, prevent blight or slums, or meet an urgent community need with at least 70 percent of funds used to benefit LMI people. 14

Sustainable Communities Initiative and Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing

In 2009, under the Obama administration, HUD developed the Sustainable Communities Initiative (SCI) to set up regional administrations and reduce the influence of suburbs in order to promote equity. 15 SCI led to the Obama administration HUD’s Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing (AFFH) rule. 16 Both programs injected an equity justification for new, non-traditional type Community Development Block Grants. 17

The Obama administration rule required that in a region, towns with different racial percentages needed to be at par with each other to receive HUD grant money under the program. 18 Under rules for SCI and AFFH, governments applying for grant money needed to prove regional equity. 19 New York City argued that requiring every jurisdiction to have the same number of whites in the region as a whole would require displacement of a large portion of its 8 million residents. 20 The Obama administration rule promoted technical assistance from PolicyLink, Minnesota Housing Partnership, and the Kirwin Institute that was funded by the left-of-center Ford Foundation, George Soros’s foundations, and the Tides Foundation. 21

The Council of State Community Development Agencies has been critical of the AFFH rules and criteria stating it could have “unintended consequences” by leading to less spending in the areas of cities where poorer people or minorities live, instead building low-income housing in white neighborhoods to lure minorities there for racial equity. 22

Finances

In 2020, Council of State Community Development Agencies had net assets of $687,206. 23 According to the organization’s tax returns, in 2020 Council of State Community Development Agencies recorded $656,708 in revenue and $652,030 in expenses. 24 In 2019, COSCDA had $674,248 in revenue and $700,070 in expenses. 25

Leadership

Dianne Taylor has been executive director of the Council of State Community Development Agencies since 2000. 26 Prior to COSCDA, Taylor worked as director for the National Community Development Association. 27 Previously, Taylor worked in planning and development for the town of Warrenton, Virginia, and as a housing development specialist in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. 28 Taylor has a M.S. in community economic development from University of Southern New Hampshire and B.A. in urban planning and community organizing from University of Pittsburgh. 29

References

  1. “Membership at Large.” Council of State Community Development Agencies. Accessed January 5, 2023. https://coscda.org/about/history-governance/; “Regional Membership.” Council of State Community Development Agencies. Accessed January 5, 2023. https://coscda.org/about/regional-membership/.
  2. “Who We Are.” Council of State Community Development Agencies. Accessed January 5, 2023. https://coscda.org/about/history-governance/.
  3. “Who We Are.” Council of State Community Development Agencies. Accessed January 5, 2023. https://coscda.org/about/history-governance/.
  4. “Who We Are.” Council of State Community Development Agencies. Accessed January 5, 2023. https://coscda.org/about/history-governance/.
  5. “Membership at Large.” Council of State Community Development Agencies. Accessed January 5, 2023. https://coscda.org/about/history-governance/; “Regional Membership.” Council of State Community Development Agencies. Accessed January 5, 2023. https://coscda.org/about/regional-membership/.
  6. “Board of Directors.” Council of State Community Development Agencies. Accessed January 5, 2023. https://coscda.org/about/history-governance/; “Regional Membership.” Council of State Community Development Agencies. Accessed January 5, 2023. https://coscda.org/about/regional-membership/.
  7. “2024 Advocacy Priorities.” Council of State Community Development Agencies. Accessed January 5, 2023. https://coscda.org/advocacy/2024-advocacy-priorities/.
  8. Council of State Community Development Agencies. Accessed January 5, 2023. https://coscda.org; “Outreach and Resources.” Council of State Community Development Agencies. Accessed January 5, 2023. https://coscda.org/advocacy/outreach-and-resources/; “Conferences and Training.” Council of State Community Development Agencies. Accessed January 5, 2023. https://coscda.org/events/.
  9. Community Development Block Grant Coalition. “Impact and Funding Need.” July 2019. Accessed January 5, 2023. https://coscda.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/CDBG-Report-72019FINAL.pdf.
  10. Community Development Block Grant Coalition. “The CDBG Coalition Calls on Congress to Fund at Least $4.2 Billion for CDBG Formula Grants in FY 2022.” June 2021. Accessed January 5, 2023. https://coscda.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/CDBG-Fact-Sheet-2021.pdf.
  11.  “FY2022 Appropriations.” Council of State Community Development Agencies. Accessed January 5, 2023. https://coscda.org/advocacy/legislative-analysis/; “2024 Advocacy Priorities.” Council of State Community Development Agencies. Accessed January 5, 2023. https://coscda.org/advocacy/2024-advocacy-priorities/.
  12. Community Development Block Grant Coalition. “The CDBG Coalition Calls on Congress to Fund at Least $4.2 Billion for CDBG Formula Grants in FY 2022.” June 2021. Accessed January 5, 2023. https://coscda.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/CDBG-Fact-Sheet-2021.pdf.
  13. Community Development Block Grant Coalition. “The CDBG Coalition Calls on Congress to Fund at Least $4.2 Billion for CDBG Formula Grants in FY 2022.” June 2021. Accessed January 5, 2023. https://coscda.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/CDBG-Fact-Sheet-2021.pdf.
  14. Community Development Block Grant Coalition. “Impact and Funding Need.” July 2019. Accessed January 5, 2023. https://coscda.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/05/CDBG-Report-72019FINAL.pdf.
  15. Luke Rosiak. “Race to the Bottom.” (New York: Broadside Books, 2022), 231-232.
  16. Luke Rosiak. “Race to the Bottom.” (New York: Broadside Books, 2022), 223.
  17.  Luke Rosiak. “Race to the Bottom.” (New York: Broadside Books, 2022), 223-235
  18. Luke Rosiak. “Race to the Bottom.” (New York: Broadside Books, 2022), 223.
  19. Luke Rosiak. “Race to the Bottom.” (New York: Broadside Books, 2022), 232.
  20. Luke Rosiak. “Race to the Bottom.” (New York: Broadside Books, 2022), 235.
  21. Luke Rosiak. “Race to the Bottom.” (New York: Broadside Books, 2022), 223-235.
  22. Luke Rosiak. “Race to the Bottom.” (New York: Broadside Books, 2022), 235.
  23. Council of State Community Development Agencies, Return of a Nonprofit Corporation (Form 990), 2020.
  24. Council of State Community Development Agencies, Return of a Nonprofit Corporation (Form 990), 2020.
  25.  Council of State Community Development Agencies, Return of a Nonprofit Corporation (Form 990), 2019.
  26. “Dianne Taylor.” LinkedIn. Accessed January 5, 2023. https://www.linkedin.com/in/dianne-taylor/.
  27. “Dianne E. Taylor.” Council of State Community Development Agencies. Accessed January 5, 2023. https://coscda.org/about/staff/.
  28. “Dianne E. Taylor.” Council of State Community Development Agencies. Accessed January 5, 2023. https://coscda.org/about/staff/.
  29. [1] “Dianne Taylor.” LinkedIn. Accessed January 5, 2023. https://www.linkedin.com/in/dianne-taylor/; “Dianne E. Taylor.” Council of State Community Development Agencies. Accessed January 5, 2023. https://coscda.org/about/staff/.
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Nonprofit Information

  • Accounting Period: June - May
  • Tax Exemption Received: November 1, 1976

  • Available Filings

    Period Form Type Total revenue Total functional expenses Total assets (EOY) Total liabilities (EOY) Unrelated business income? Total contributions Program service revenue Investment income Comp. of current officers, directors, etc. Form 990
    2020 Jun Form 990 $674,248 $700,070 $853,106 $170,578 N $36,080 $626,277 $11,891 $198,387 PDF
    2019 Jun Form 990 $745,748 $730,684 $942,943 $234,593 N $39,550 $694,630 $13,079 $195,080 PDF
    2018 Jun Form 990 $723,880 $684,117 $927,312 $234,026 N $25,750 $691,758 $6,372 $188,955 PDF
    2017 Jun Form 990 $666,970 $678,949 $866,869 $213,346 N $26,892 $634,930 $3,497 $192,766 PDF
    2016 Jun Form 990 $760,426 $740,539 $907,883 $242,381 N $50,789 $699,693 $3,221 $150,801
    2015 Jun Form 990 $735,140 $739,822 $857,099 $211,130 N $38,597 $690,462 $2,741 $143,304 PDF
    2014 Jun Form 990 $697,689 $703,989 $885,789 $229,651 N $35,000 $659,462 $4,769 $158,602 PDF
    2013 Jun Form 990 $738,486 $717,853 $917,233 $257,269 N $56,217 $679,212 $3,057 $135,204 PDF
    2012 Jun Form 990 $703,676 $671,481 $959,095 $319,721 N $25,079 $675,464 $3,133 $129,892 PDF

    Additional Filings (PDFs)

    Council of State Community Development Agencies (COSCDA)

    630 I Street, NW
    Washington, DC