Non-profit

Center on Policy Initiatives

Website:

www.cpisandiego.org/

Location:

SAN DIEGO, CA

Tax ID:

33-0824881

Tax-Exempt Status:

501(c)(3)

Budget (2018):

Revenue: $2,143,264
Expenses: $1,959,444
Assets: $2,502,954

Formation:

1997

Type:

Community Activist Organization

Executive Director:

Kyra R. Greene

The Center on Policy Initiatives (CPI) is a left-leaning advocacy and labor union activist organization focusing on the San Diego, California, metropolitan area. [1] CPI is a member of various left-of-center coalitions including the Partnership for Working Families,[2] the Center for Popular Democracy,[3] [4]the Economic Policy Institute-affiliated Economic Analysis and Research Network,[5] and Rock the Vote. [6]

CPI has received grants from the Windward Fund, an environmentalist fiscal sponsor of dark money organizations controlled by Arabella Advisors,[7] George Soros’s Open Society Foundations,[8] Marguerite Casey Foundation,[9] California Endowment,[10] [11] the Nathan Cummings Foundation,[12] [13]  and the Satterberg Foundation. [14] CPI also works with SEIU 221 to shift San Diego’s budget priorities in favor of labor unions. [15]

CPI Executive Director and Board President Kyra R. Greene[16] has said that “more policing is not the route to public safety,” has criticized the mayor of San Diego’s decision to invest in policing as “not race-neutral,”[17] and has written on Twitter that “only women and people of color should run for office for the sake of our democracy.” [18]

History and Leadership

Center on Policy Initiatives (CPI) was founded in 1997 to shape policy in the San Diego, California, metropolitan area. [19]

Kyra R. Greene is CPI’s executive director and board president. [20] Previously she taught courses on economic inequality and race at San Diego State University[21] and worked as a diversity coordinator at Stanford University. [22]

In 2021, Greene supported declaring racism a “public health crisis” in San Diego County and said the county has a “long history of white supremacist organizing and activity. [23] In 2020, Greene said on Twitter that “only women and people of color should run for office for the sake of our democracy”[24]  and she wrote a letter saying “more policing is not the route to public safety” and the mayor of San Diego’s decision to invest in policing is “not race-neutral.” [25]

Green is the board chair of the left-of-center Partnership for Working Families and works on the board of various left-of-center organizations including the San Diego Social Equity Collaborative, League of Conservation Voters San Diego, and Engage San Diego. [26]

Activities and Funding

CPI’s activities include producing research papers and policy proposals,[27] engagement with groups of left-of-center coalitions and networks,[28] and so-called leadership programs on “economic justice”[29] and local boards and commissions. [30]

CPI is a member of the left-of-center Partnership for Working Families,[31] a member of the left-of-center Center for Popular Democracy,[32] [33] a civic technology partner of the left-progressive Rock the Vote,[34] and affiliated with the Economic Policy Institute-affiliated Economic Analysis and Research Network and other San Diego-specific left-of-center organizations. [35]

San Diego Activism

CPI plays a leading role in several San Diego activist organizations. CPI organizes A Community Coalition for Responsible Development (ACCORD), comprising of community organizing, labor union-aligned, and liberal religious organizations in San Diego. [36]

As a part of the San Diego Organizing Project’s “Invest in San Diego” program, CPI works alongside ACLU of San Diego and Imperial Counties, ACCE Institute, Chicano Federation, Environmental Health Coalition, and Planned Parenthood of the Pacific Southwest, Partners for Progress, and SEIU 221 to shift San Diego’s budget priorities in favor of labor unions. [37]

CPI is the lead convener[38] of the Raise Up San Diego coalition, whose members include the SEIU-United Service Workers West, United Food and Commercial Workers, United Domestic Workers Alliance, and the Interfaith Worker Justice labor union-aligned organization. [39]

CPI leads the Community Schools Coalition with the goal of transforming schools in the San Diego Unified School District into so-called community schools. [40] Participating members include Association of Raza Educators, International Rescue Committee, Justice Overcoming Boundaries, San Diego 350, United Domestic Workers, and Urban League San Diego. [41]

CPI’s Community Budget Alliance aims to change San Diego’s budget and includes left-of-center and labor organizations such as ACLU of San Diego and Imperial Counties, ACCE Institute, AFSCME Local 127, Environmental Health Coalition, Interfaith Worker Justice San Diego, Partnership for the Advancement of New Americans (PANA), Planned Parenthood Action Fund of the Pacific Southwest, San Diego 350United Domestic Workers Local 3930, and others. [42]

CPI is also a member of left-wing activist organization Engage San Diego. Other partners in this group include abortion provider Planned Parenthood of the Pacific Southwest,  the left-of-center ACCE Institute, ACLU California, the left-wing Partnership for the Advancement of New Americans, Environmental Health Coalition, and others. [43]

Funding

On April 28, 2020, CPI received a $205,265 loan from the Federal government’s coronavirus PPP program to support its payroll operations. [44] That same year, CPI received a $100,000 grant to support various groups as a part of San Diego Foundation’s COVID-19 Community Response Fund. [45]

In 2019, CPI reported total assets of $3,446,501, including $2,267,391 of revenue through contributions and grants in 2019. [46]

CPI has received numerous donations from major left-of-center foundations since at least 2012. In 2019, CPI received a $75,000 grant from the Windward Fund, an environmentalist fiscal sponsor of dark money organizations controlled by Arabella Advisors. [47] Recipients of these Windward Fund grants all are members and affiliates of the left-of-center Climate Justice Alliance, Partnership for Working Families, People’s Action, and EJ Forum. [48]

CPI received $225,000 in grants from the left-of-center California Endowment in 2019,[49] $225,000 in 2018, [50]  and $227,500 in 2017. [51]

In 2019, CPI received a $50,000 grant from the San Diego Foundation, which is partnered with the S.D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation, to evaluate racial, gender, and socioeconomic diversity among elected and appointed water board members and to enhance diversity of voices in water decisions. [52]

In 2019, CPI received a Core Support Grant from the Satterberg Foundation valued at $500,000 over 5 years. [53] This grant is an increase from grants of $75,087[54] and $175,477[55] from the foundation in 2017 and 2016, respectively.

Also in 2019, the left-of-center Kresge Foundation issued a $100,000 grant to the Environmental Health Coalition which in turn used the grant to partner with CPI and other groups on climate projects. [56]

In 2018, CPI received a grant of $200,000 from the left-of-center California Wellness Foundation(CWF). [57] CWF also issued grants totaling $180,000 to CPI in 2015 for “advancement of equitable economic prosperity.” [58]

In 2017, CPI received a grant of $187,500 from the left-of-center Marguerite Casey Foundation. [59]

CPI was one of several San Diego-based organizations that was a part of $1.9 million grants from George Soros’s Open Society Foundations (OSF)[60] as a part of OSF’s Open Places Initiative in 2014. [61] [62]  CPI was a part of a $100,000 grant from OSF in 2013. [63]

In the past, CPI has also received grants of $175,00 from the left-of-center Rosenberg Foundation,[64]$150,000 from the Marguerite Casey Foundation,[65] $300,000 from James Irvine Foundation,[66] and funding from the environmentalist The Nathan Cummings Foundation. [67] [68]

References

  1. Halverstadt, Lisa. “Officials Want to Dig Deeper on What’s Driving Black Homelessness.” Voice of San Diego. July 15, 2020. https://www.voiceofsandiego.org/topics/government/officials-want-to-dig-deeper-on-whats-driving-black-homelessness/. ^
  2. “CPI | Center on Policy Initiatives.” About the Partnership for Working Families. Partnership for Working Families. Accessed May 30, 2021. https://www.forworkingfamilies.org/about/affiliates/cpi ^
  3. “Justice Transformation: CPD Network Join Uprisings with Calls to Defund Police.” The Center for Popular Democracy Blog. July 24, 2020. https://www.populardemocracy.org/blog/justice-transformation-cpd-network-join-uprisings-calls-defund-police. ^
  4. “California Partners.” The Center for Popular Democracy. Accessed May 30, 2021. https://www.populardemocracy.org/about-us/our-partners. ^
  5. “Networks.” Center on Policy Initiatives. Accessed May 31, 2021. https://cpisandiego.org/networks/. ^
  6. “Tech for Civic Engagement.” Rock the Vote. Accessed May 30, 2021. https://www.rockthevote.org/programs-and-partner-resources/tech-for-civic-engagement/. ^
  7. “The Fund to Build Grassroots Power.” Windward Fund. Accessed May 30, 2021. https://www.windwardfund.org/the-fund-to-build-grassroots-power/. ^
  8. “Open Society Taps Three Sites to Spur Local Progress.” Open Society Foundations. Accessed May 30, 2021. https://www.opensocietyfoundations.org/newsroom/open-society-taps-three-sites-spur-local-progress. ^
  9. “Marguerite Casey Foundation.” Return of Private Foundation. (Form 990-PF). 2013. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/organizations/912062197/201443089349100524/full. ^
  10. “The California Endowment.” Return of a Private Foundation. (Form 990-PF). 2018. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/organizations/954523232/201940429349100709/IRS990PF. ^
  11. “The California Endowment.” Return of a Private Foundation. (Form 990-PF). 2017. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/display_990/954523232/05_2019_prefixes_95-99%2F954523232_201803_990PF_2019050216262028. ^
  12. “2008 Annual Report.” The Nathan Cummings Foundation. Released 2008. https://annualreports.issuelab.org/resources/13146/13146.pdf. ^
  13. “2009 Annual Report.” The Nathan Cummings Foundation. Released 2009. http://www.w9ngs.issuelab.org/resources/13147/13147.pdf. ^
  14. “Satterberg Foundation.” Return of a Private Foundation. (Form 990-PF). 2016. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/organizations/911501066/201723199349102712/IRS990PF. ^
  15. “Make San Diego County Work for All Families.” San Diego Organizing Project. Accessed May 30, 2021. https://sdop.net/county-government-accountability/making-san-diego-county-work-for-all-families. ^
  16. “Kyra R. Greene, PhD.” Center on Policy Initiatives. Accessed May 30, 2021. https://cpisandiego.org/kyra-r-greene-phd/. ^
  17. Greene, Kyra R., PhD. “I am Black and I am Kyra – A message from Our Executive Director.” Center on Policy Initiatives. Featured Letter. June 8, 2020. https://cpisandiego.org/2020/06/08/i-am-black-and-i-am-kyra-a-message-from-our-executive-director. ^
  18. Kyra Greene Tweet. Twitter. October 12, 2020. Accessed May 31, 2021. https://twitter.com/kgreeneCPI/status/1315694791422668801. ^
  19. “About Us.” Center on Policy Initiatives. Center on Policy Initiatives Website. Accessed May 31, 2021. https://cpisandiego.org/about/. ^
  20. “Kyra R. Greene, PhD.” Center on Policy Initiatives. Accessed May 30, 2021. https://cpisandiego.org/kyra-r-greene-phd/. ^
  21. “Kyra R. Greene, PhD.” Center on Policy Initiatives. Accessed May 30, 2021. https://cpisandiego.org/kyra-r-greene-phd/. ^
  22. “Kyra Greene.” Kyra Green LinkedIn Profile. Accessed May 30, 2021. https://www.linkedin.com/in/kyra-greene-phd/. ^
  23. “Declaring Racism a Public Health Crisis in San Diego County.” Center on Policy Initiatives Vimeo Page. January 6, 2021. Accessed May 31, 2021. https://vimeo.com/508226081. ^
  24. Kyra Greene Tweet. Twitter. October 12, 2020. Accessed May 31, 2021. https://twitter.com/kgreeneCPI/status/1315694791422668801. ^
  25. Greene, Kyra R., PhD. “I am Black and I am Kyra – A message from Our Executive Director.” Center on Policy Initiatives. Featured Letter. June 8, 2020. https://cpisandiego.org/2020/06/08/i-am-black-and-i-am-kyra-a-message-from-our-executive-director. ^
  26. “Kyra R. Greene, PhD.” Center on Policy Initiatives. Accessed May 30, 2021. https://cpisandiego.org/kyra-r-greene-phd/. ^
  27. “Research.” Center on Policy Initiatives. Accessed May 31, 2021. https://cpisandiego.org/research/. ^
  28. “Coalitions.” Center on Policy Initiatives. Accessed May 31, 2021. https://cpisandiego.org/coalitions/. ^
  29. “Students for Economic Justice.” Center on Policy Initiatives. Accessed May 31, 2021. https://cpisandiego.org/sej/. ^
  30. “Boards and Commissions Leadership Institute – BCLI.” Center on Policy Initiatives. Accessed May 31, 2021. https://cpisandiego.org/leadership-programs/bcli/. ^
  31. “CPI | Center on Policy Initiatives.” About the Partnership for Working Families. Partnership for Working Families. Accessed May 30, 2021. https://www.forworkingfamilies.org/about/affiliates/cpi ^
  32. “Justice Transformation: CPD Network Join Uprisings with Calls to Defund Police.” The Center for Popular Democracy Blog. July 24, 2020. https://www.populardemocracy.org/blog/justice-transformation-cpd-network-join-uprisings-calls-defund-police. ^
  33. “California Partners.” The Center for Popular Democracy. Accessed May 30, 2021. https://www.populardemocracy.org/about-us/our-partners. ^
  34. “Tech for Civic Engagement.” Rock the Vote. Accessed May 30, 2021. https://www.rockthevote.org/programs-and-partner-resources/tech-for-civic-engagement/. ^
  35. “Networks.” Center on Policy Initiatives. Accessed May 31, 2021. https://cpisandiego.org/networks/. ^
  36. “A Community Coalition for Responsible Development – ACCORD.” Center on Policy Initiatives. May 31, 2021. https://cpisandiego.org/a-community-coalition-for-responsible-development-accord/. ^
  37. “Make San Diego County Work for All Families.” San Diego Organizing Project. Accessed May 30, 2021. https://sdop.net/county-government-accountability/making-san-diego-county-work-for-all-families. ^
  38. “About Raise Up San Diego.” Center on Policy Initiatives. Accessed May 31, 2021. https://cpisandiego.org/raise-up-san-diego/ ^
  39. “About Raise Up San Diego.” Center on Policy Initiatives. Accessed May 31, 2021. https://cpisandiego.org/raise-up-san-diego/ ^
  40. “Community Schools.” Center on Policy Initiatives. Accessed May 31, 2021. https://cpisandiego.org/community-schools/. ^
  41. “Community Schools.” Center on Policy Initiatives. Accessed May 31, 2021. https://cpisandiego.org/community-schools/. ^
  42. “Community Budget Alliance.” Center on Policy Initiatives. Accessed May 31, 2021. https://cpisandiego.org/cba/. ^
  43. “Partners.” Engage San Diego. Accessed May 31, 2021. https://www.engagesandiego.org/ ^
  44. “Center on Policy Initiatives.” Pro Publica Tracking PPP. Accessed May 30, 2021. https://projects.propublica.org/coronavirus/bailouts/loans/center-on-policy-initiatives-1681517309. ^
  45. “Relief & Recovery Grants.” The San Diego Foundation. Accessed May 30, 2021. http://www.w9ngs.issuelab.org/resources/13147/13147.pdf. ^
  46. “Center on Policy Initiatives.” Return of Organization Exempt from Income Tax. (Form 990). 2019. ^
  47. “The Fund to Build Grassroots Power.” Windward Fund. Accessed May 30, 2021. https://www.windwardfund.org/the-fund-to-build-grassroots-power/. ^
  48. “The Fund to Build Grassroots Power.” Windward Fund. Accessed May 30, 2021. https://www.windwardfund.org/the-fund-to-build-grassroots-power/. ^
  49. “The California Endowment.” Return of a Private Foundation. (Form 990-PF). 2019. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/display_990/954523232/11_2020_prefixes_91-99%2F954523232_201903_990PF_2020111317421014. ^
  50. “The California Endowment.” Return of a Private Foundation. (Form 990-PF). 2018. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/organizations/954523232/201940429349100709/IRS990PF. ^
  51. “The California Endowment.” Return of a Private Foundation. (Form 990-PF). 2017. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/display_990/954523232/05_2019_prefixes_95-99%2F954523232_201803_990PF_2019050216262028. ^
  52. Sklar, Debbie L. “San Diego Foundation Awards $364,000 for Local Projects to Address Climate Change.” The Times of San Diego. October 10, 2019. https://timesofsandiego.com/tech/2019/10/10/san-diego-foundation-awards-364000-for-local-projects-to-address-climate-change/. ^
  53. “Grants Database.” Satterberg Foundation. Accessed May 30, 2021. https://satterberg.org/grantees/. ^
  54. “Satterberg Foundation.” Return of a Private Foundation. (Form 990-PF). 2017. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/display_990/911501066/02_2019_prefixes_90-93%2F911501066_201712_990PF_2019022116113066. ^
  55. “Satterberg Foundation.” Return of a Private Foundation. (Form 990-PF). 2016. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/organizations/911501066/201723199349102712/IRS990PF. ^
  56. “August 27: Kresge Foundation Awards $100,000 Winning Grant to Environmental health Coalition to Build Climate Resilience, Improve Health.” Environmental health Coalition Press Release. August 27, 2019. https://www.environmentalhealth.org/index.php/en/media-center/press-releases/1303-august-27-kresge-foundation-awards-100-000-planning-grant-to-environmental-health-coalition-to-build-climate-resilience-improve-health. ^
  57. “California Wellness Foundation.” Return of a Private Foundation. (Form 990-PF). 2018. 2F954292101_201812_990PF_2020020517107805. ^
  58. “The California Wellness Foundation.” Return of a Private Foundation (Form 990-PF). 2015. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/organizations/912062197/201443089349100524/full. ^
  59. “Marguerite Casey Foundation.” Return of a Private Foundation. (Form 990-PF). 2017. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/display_990/912062197/02_2019_prefixes_90-93%2F912062197_201712_990PF_2019020716072150 ^
  60. “Open Society Taps Three Sites to Spur Local Progress.” Open Society Foundations. Accessed May 30, 2021. https://www.opensocietyfoundations.org/newsroom/open-society-taps-three-sites-spur-local-progress. ^
  61. “Open Society Foundations Award $5.7 Million in “Open Places” Grants. Philanthropy News Digest. January 21, 2014. Accessed May 30, 2021. https://philanthropynewsdigest.org/news/open-society-foundations-award-5.7-million-in-open-places-grants ^
  62. “San Diego Receives $1.9 Million Investment to Empower Residents.” ACLU San Diego Press Release. ACLU San Diego. January 16, 2014. https://www.aclusandiego.org/en/news/san-diego-receives-19-million-investment-empower-residents. ^
  63. “Open Society Foundations Launch U.S. Initiative Promoting Local Change.” Open Society Foundations. April 5, 2013. https://www.opensocietyfoundations.org/newsroom/open-society-foundations-launch-us-initiative-promoting-local-change. ^
  64. “Economic Security of Working Families.” Rosenberg Foundation. Accessed May 30, 2021. https://www.cybergrants.com/rosenberg/economic.html. ^
  65. “Marguerite Casey Foundation.” Return of Private Foundation. (Form 990-PF). 2013. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/organizations/912062197/201443089349100524/full. ^
  66. “Center on Policy Initiatives.” James Irvine Foundation – Grants Awarded. Accessed May 30, 2021. https://www.irvine.org/our-grants/search-grants-awarded/page/96/ ^
  67. “2008 Annual Report.” The Nathan Cummings Foundation. Released 2008. https://annualreports.issuelab.org/resources/13146/13146.pdf. ^
  68. “2009 Annual Report.” The Nathan Cummings Foundation. Released 2009. http://www.w9ngs.issuelab.org/resources/13147/13147.pdf. ^
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Nonprofit Information

  • Accounting Period: December - November
  • Tax Exemption Received: March 1, 1999

  • Available Filings

    Period Form Type Total revenue Total functional expenses Total assets (EOY) Total liabilities (EOY) Unrelated business income? Total contributions Program service revenue Investment income Comp. of current officers, directors, etc. Form 990
    2018 Dec Form 990 $2,143,264 $1,959,444 $2,502,954 $95,621 N $2,006,493 $0 $26,236 $98,397 PDF
    2017 Dec Form 990 $1,757,803 $2,041,680 $2,429,435 $143,418 N $1,363,629 $0 $14,880 $138,484 PDF
    2016 Dec Form 990 $3,868,757 $2,991,280 $2,712,680 $182,955 N $3,619,578 $0 $16,698 $79,810
    2015 Dec Form 990 $1,895,638 $2,626,579 $1,846,747 $248,040 N $1,594,849 $0 $7,818 $76,750 PDF
    2014 Dec Form 990 $3,214,776 $2,434,562 $2,463,793 $147,225 N $3,021,950 $0 $11,090 $72,826 PDF
    2013 Dec Form 990 $1,081,668 $1,357,736 $1,592,144 $51,953 N $999,635 $0 $8,502 $67,194 PDF
    2012 Dec Form 990 $957,422 $1,107,700 $1,846,194 $27,858 N $854,883 $0 $9,577 $71,504 PDF
    2011 Dec Form 990 $1,095,439 $938,610 $1,989,213 $34,241 N $1,007,142 $0 $22,324 $70,443 PDF

    Additional Filings (PDFs)

    Center on Policy Initiatives

    3727 CAMINO DEL RIO S STE 100
    SAN DIEGO, CA 92108-4000