Non-profit

Californians for Justice Education Fund

Website:

caljustice.org/

Location:

SAN JOSE, CA

Tax ID:

94-3256009

Tax-Exempt Status:

501(c)(3)

Budget (2017):

Revenue: $2,833,556
Expenses: $1,779,685
Assets: $3,894,311

Californians for Justice Education Fund, also known as Californians for Justice (CFJ), is a left-of-center advocacy group focusing on inter-ethnic educational disparities. It has received thousands of dollars in donations from various left-of-center and liberal groups, lobbies and advocates at the state level. [1]

The organization has advocated that California should remove police from schools and instead direct money to counselors and programs that empower minority students. [2]

In the wake of the death of George Floyd, the Napa Valley Community Foundation urged donors to give to “organizations that advance racial justice in the Bay Area” and listed Californians for Justice as a “statewide youth-powered organization fighting for racial justice” worthy of funding. [3]

Staff

Taryn Ishida is the executive director of Californians for Justice. [4] From 2008 to 2013, Ishida was employed as a program coordinator at the David and Lucile Packard Foundation, a major grantmaking foundation that supports environmentalist causes and population-control programs. Before that from 2006 to 2008, she worked at the Silicon Valley Community Foundation, a left-of-center grantmaking organization that funds a variety of political and charitable causes. [5]

Saa’un Bell is the strategy director of CFJ. [6] Bell is also an associate and trainer for the Center for Story-based Strategy, an organization that provides campaign-building services to left-of-center activist and advocacy groups. [7]

CFJ board members include a number of high school and college students; representatives from the Learning Policy Institute, a left-leaning education policy research organization; and representatives of the Advancement Project, a left-wing agitation group that organizes opposition to voter identification laws. [8]

Issues and Advocacy

Californians for Justice opposes school budget cuts and advocates for increased public-school funding. The organization also supports so-called “community schools” which integrate academics with health, social services, and youth and community development. [9]

In advance of the 2020 California Democratic Primary, CFJ, in conjunction with the San Jose chapter of the gun control group March for Our Lives, held a voter registration drive. [10]

In 2018, CFJ lobbied the California Assembly on a number of bills, including Assembly Bill 2657 which put restrictions on the ability of school staff to restrain or isolate disruptive or violent students. [11]

In 2018, CFJ advocated on two ballot measures that voters rejected. The first was Santa Clara County Measure G on the June ballot, which would have implemented a parcel tax to raise funds for school improvements. The second was California Proposition 10 which would have allowed counties and cities to adopt rent control ordinances to regulate how much landlords could charge tenants. [12]

For the 2018 midterm elections, CFJ made voter contacts, distributed a voter guide, and held a ballot party. [13]

Grantmaking

In 2018, CFJ gave $10,000 alliance participation grants to multiple left-progressive racial-activism and economic advocacy groups, including Fathers & Families of San Joaquin, Khmer Girls in Action, and the Orange County Congregation Community. [14]

Youth Organize! California lists CFJ as a fiscal sponsor. [15]

Funding

Over the years, CFJ has received hundreds of thousands of dollars from the Evelyn and Walter Haas, Jr. Fund, a private foundation that provides grants primarily to left-of-center activist groups that focus on supporting liberal expansionist immigration policy, LGBT interests, education, and organizations in the San Francisco Bay area. [16]

CFJ has received thousands of dollars from Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors, one of the nation’s largest philanthropic organizations which funds groups with left-leaning social-change missions related to race, the environment, and gender. [17]

Between 2020 and 2018, CFJ has received $300,000 from the Silicon Valley Community Foundation, a controversial left-of-center grantmaking organization. [18]

In 2020, CFJ received money to support a student-led education advocacy campaign from the Stuart Foundation, a private foundation located in San Francisco that funds education initiatives. [19]

In 2019, CFJ received a $125,000 from the Weingart Foundation, a grantmaking organization that supports left-of-center advocacy groups. [20]

In 2018, CFJ received a $25,000 grant from the Liberty Hill Foundation, a left-wing grantmaking foundation. [21]

In 2017, CFJ received a $300,000 grant from the Satterberg Foundation, a private foundation supporting left-of-center organizations principally in the Pacific Northwest region. [22]

In 2016, CFJ received a $450,000 grant from the Marguerite Casey Foundation, a left-of-center private foundation that funds community organizing groups. [23]

In 2015, CFJ received a $25,000 grant from the David and Lucile Packard Foundation, a foundation that supports environmentalist causes and population control programs. [24] Also in 2015, CFJ received a $225,000 grant from the California Wellness Foundation, an organization that funds numerous California-focused left-of-center groups. [25]

In both 2012 and 2013, CFJ received $30,000 in grants from the Edward W. Hazen Foundation, a left-leaning public welfare and social policy grantmaker. [26]

CFJ has also been granted between $50,000 to $100,000 from the Akonadi Foundation, a left-leaning racial equality and illegal immigration advocacy organization. [27]

The organization has also received $40,000 from Funders’ Collaborative on Youth Organizing, a racial-interest policy organization. [28]

References

  1. “Our Work.” Californians for Justice. Accessed September 7, 2020. https://caljustice.org/our-work/ ^
  2. Jones, Carolyn. “California school districts should spend less on police, more on counselors, state leaders say.” EdSource. June 25, 2020. Accessed September 7, 2020. https://edsource.org/2020/california-school-districts-should-spend-less-on-police-more-on-counselors-state-leaders-say/634450 ^
  3. “An Open Letter to Our Community.” Napa Valley Community Foundation. Accessed September 7, 2020. https://www.napavalleycf.org/an-open-letter-to-our-community/ ^
  4. “Staff and Board.” Californians for Justice. Accessed September 7, 2020. https://caljustice.org/staff-and-board/ ^
  5. Ishida, Taryn. “Page Post.” LinkedIn. Accessed September 7, 2020. https://www.linkedin.com/in/taryn-ishida-093b2065/ ^
  6. “Staff and Board.” Californians for Justice. Accessed September 7, 2020. https://caljustice.org/staff-and-board/ ^
  7. Bell, Saa’un. “Page Post.” LinkedIn. Accessed September 7, 2020. https://www.linkedin.com/in/saaunpbell ^
  8. “Californians for Justice Board of Directors.” Californians for Justice. Accessed September 7, 2020. https://caljustice.org/staff-and-board/#board ^
  9. Ortega, Maria and Laura Zavala, Tere Onofre. “Listen to community voices as we redesign California public schools.” EdSource. May 15, 2020. Accessed September 7, 2020. https://edsource.org/2020/listen-to-community-voices-as-we-redesign-california-public-schools/631495 ^
  10. Mendez, Elizabeth. “Major changes coming to San Jose’s upcoming elections.” San Jose Spotlight. January 27, 2020. Accessed September 7, 2020. https://sanjosespotlight.com/major-changes-coming-to-san-joses-upcoming-elections/ ^
  11. Internal Revenue Service. Form 990. Californians for Justice Education Fund. 2018. https://pdf.guidestar.org/PDF_Images/2018/943/256/2018-943256009-116ae630-9.pdf ^
  12. Internal Revenue Service. Form 990. Californians for Justice Education Fund. 2018. https://pdf.guidestar.org/PDF_Images/2018/943/256/2018-943256009-116ae630-9.pdf ^
  13. Internal Revenue Service. Form 990. Californians for Justice Education Fund. 2018. https://pdf.guidestar.org/PDF_Images/2018/943/256/2018-943256009-116ae630-9.pdf ^
  14. Internal Revenue Service. Form 990. Californians for Justice Education Fund. 2018. https://pdf.guidestar.org/PDF_Images/2018/943/256/2018-943256009-116ae630-9.pdf ^
  15. “Californians for Justice.” Youth Organize California. Accessed September 7, 2020. https://yocalifornia.org/content/californians-justice ^
  16. “Californians for Justice Education Fund.” Evelyn & Walter Haas, Jr. Fund. Accessed September 7, 2020. https://www.haasjr.org/grants/grantee/californians-for-justice-education-fund ^
  17. “Current Grantees.” Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors. Accessed September 7, 2020. https://www.rockpa.org/project/cepf-2/current-grantees/#CFJ ^
  18. “Making change: Youth civic participation is about more than just voting.” Silicon Valley Community Foundation. Accessed September 7, 2020. https://www.siliconvalleycf.org/blog/philanthropy/making-change-youth-civic-participation-about-more-just-voting ^
  19. “Spring 2019 Grants List.” Stuart Foundation. Accessed September 7, 2020. https://stuartfoundation.org/current-partners/spring-2019-grants/ ^
  20. “Public & Society Benefit.” Weingart Foundation. Accessed September 7, 2020. https://www.weingartfnd.org/recent-grants?grant_catid=5 ^
  21. “The 2018 Fund for Change Grants.” Liberty Hill Foundation. Accessed September 7, 2020. https://www.libertyhill.org/2018/09/24/the-2018-fund-for-change-grants ^
  22. “2017 California Core Support Grand Recipients.” Satterberg Foundation. Accessed September 7, 2020. https://satterberg.org/blog/2017-06-07-2017-california-core-support-grant-recipients/ ^
  23. “Grantee Database – Californians for Justice Education Fund.” Marguerite Casey Foundation. Accessed September 7, 2020. https://caseygrants.org/grantee-database/californians-for-justice-education-fund/ ^
  24. “Californians for Justice Education Fund.” David and Lucile Packard Foundation. Accessed September 7, 2020. https://www.packard.org/grants-and-investments/grants-database/californians-for-justice-education-fund-inc/ ^
  25. “Grants Approved in the Fourth Quarter of 2015.” California Wellness Foundation. Accessed September 7, 2020. https://www.calwellness.org/assets/docs/grants/fourth_quarter_2015_grants_list.pdf ^
  26. “Californians for Justice.” Edward W. Hazen Foundation. Accessed September 7, 2020. http://hazenfoundation.org/californians-for-justice-cfj-2/ ^
  27. “Akondai Foundation Awards Nearly $1.4 Million to 15 Organizations Working to Advance Racial Justice in Oakland.” Akondai Foundation. Accessed September 7, 2020. https://akonadi.org/akonadi-foundation-awards-nearly-1-4-million-to-15-organizations-working-to-advance-racial-justice-in-oakland/ ^
  28. “Pipelines to Power.” Funders’ Collaborative on Youth Organizing. Accessed September 7, 2020. https://fcyo.org/programs/pipelines-to-power ^
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Nonprofit Information

  • Accounting Period: December - November
  • Tax Exemption Received: June 1, 1997

  • Available Filings

    Period Form Type Total revenue Total functional expenses Total assets (EOY) Total liabilities (EOY) Unrelated business income? Total contributions Program service revenue Investment income Comp. of current officers, directors, etc. Form 990
    2017 Dec Form 990 $2,833,556 $1,779,685 $3,894,311 $136,546 N $2,771,456 $56,372 $3,110 $82,333 PDF
    2016 Dec Form 990 $2,244,489 $1,462,530 $2,773,078 $69,184 N $2,155,337 $57,988 $1,952 $87,003 PDF
    2015 Dec Form 990 $2,082,627 $1,215,255 $1,973,628 $51,693 N $2,068,311 $0 $1,185 $85,559 PDF
    2014 Dec Form 990 $980,779 $1,268,837 $1,084,813 $30,250 N $973,154 $130 $2,085 $82,476 PDF
    2013 Dec Form 990 $1,323,073 $1,302,355 $1,396,038 $53,417 N $1,321,315 $0 $1,758 $107,124 PDF
    2012 Dec Form 990 $1,152,269 $1,392,953 $1,366,966 $45,063 N $1,148,695 $370 $3,204 $119,830 PDF
    2011 Dec Form 990 $761,848 $1,257,020 $1,598,765 $36,178 N $753,961 $847 $7,040 $73,822 PDF

    Additional Filings (PDFs)

    Californians for Justice Education Fund

    1971 LAS PLUMAS AVE
    SAN JOSE, CA 95133-1741