Non-profit

National Housing Conference

Website:

nhc.org/

Location:

WASHINGTON, DC

Tax ID:

53-0208180

Tax-Exempt Status:

501(c)(3)

Budget (2019):

Revenue: $1,659,034
Expenses: $1,796,878
Assets: $576,409

Type:

Nonprofit Public Housing Advocacy Group

President:

David Dworkin

The National Housing Conference (NHC) is a nonprofit advocacy organization based in Washington, D.C. that supports the implementation of left-of-center public housing policies at the federal level. The organization was founded in 1931 and has been active in supporting public housing projects since the Great Depression. [1]

In addition to its advocacy work, NHC hosts annual conferences that include federal, state, and local housing policymakers; trade associations; private sector banks; mortgage lenders; and other advocacy organizations. [2] NHC has received funding from a number of donors, including the AFL-CIO Housing Investment Trust, Bank of America, Fannie Mae, and Freddie Mac. [3]

Background

The National Housing Conference was founded in 1931 in New York City as the National Public Housing Conference. The organization was first led by Mary Kingsbury Simkhovitch, who was the director of a public housing project in New York at the time. The organization was active in promoting the first public housing laws passed in New York in the 1930s and began lobbying Congress on various housing laws passed in the 1930s and beyond. These include the National Housing Acts of 1934, 1937, and 1941; the G.I. Bill; and the Housing and Community Development Act of 1974, which established the “Section 8” housing program. [4]

Today, NHC operates as a membership organization that hosts meetings for policymakers and private sector entities that are stakeholders in public housing policy. The organization hosts two large annual conferences, produces research, and conducts advocacy on behalf of the public and affordable housing industry. [5]

Activity

The National Housing Conference promotes a left-of-center policy agenda mostly centered around maintaining and bolstering federal spending on public and affordable housing programs. The NHC supports funding for programs including the low-income housing tax credit, the capital magnet fund, new markets tax credits, and community development financing institutions (CDFIs). The NHC also supports increased funding for community development block grants and the HOME Investment Partnerships Program and supports the use of investments in so-called “opportunity zones,” though it claims to oppose gentrification. [6]

The NHC also supports environmentalist housing policies that reduce the carbon footprint of construction as well as modernizing the Community Reinvestment Act to mandate race-specific tracking and goals for lending institutions. [7]

The NHC is also a strong advocate of a Democratic effort in Congress to provide $10 billion in down payment aid to African American and Hispanic homebuyers. Republicans have raised concerns about the racial targeting of the funds, as well as the possibility that the aid will put people into homes they cannot afford. [8]

Membership

The National Housing Conference is funded largely by dues from private sector, nonprofit, and individual memberships. The NHC has over 100 individuals who pay dues in addition to dozens of financial institutions, government agencies, and nonprofit housing and homelessness organizations. Companies and nonprofits pay dues ranging from $5,000 to over $25,000 annually. [9]

Organizations at the NHC’s platinum membership level giving over $25,000 annually include Bank of America, the Council of Federal Home Loan Banks, JP Morgan Chase, Quicken Loans, and Wells Fargo. Other members of the organization include the AFL-CIO Housing Investment Trust, Fannie Mae, Freddie Mac, Goldman Sachs, Morgan Stanley, the Mortgage Bankers Association, the National Association of Home Builders, the National Association of Realtors, AARP, Facebook, the National Fair Housing Alliance, the National Low Income Housing Coalition and the California Department of Housing and Community Development. [10]

References

  1. “75 Years of Affordable Housing Development.” New York Housing Conference. 2006. Accessed via Wayback Machine June 24, 2021. https://web.archive.org/web/20080910003216/http://www.nyhousingconference.org/pdf/Housing_QVersion.pdf ^
  2. “About.” National Housing Conference. Accessed June 24, 2021. https://nhc.org/about/# ^
  3. “Our Members.” National Housing Conference. Accessed June 24, 2021. https://nhc.org/membership/our-members/ ^
  4. “75 Years of Affordable Housing Development.” New York Housing Conference. 2006. Accessed via Wayback Machine June 24, 2021. https://web.archive.org/web/20080910003216/http://www.nyhousingconference.org/pdf/Housing_QVersion.pdf ^
  5. “About.” National Housing Conference. Accessed June 24, 2021. https://nhc.org/about/# ^
  6. [1] “Policy Agenda.” National Housing Conference. Accessed June 24, 2021. https://nhc.org/about-policy-and-research/policy-agenda/ ^
  7. “Policy Agenda.” National Housing Conference. Accessed June 24, 2021. https://nhc.org/about-policy-and-research/policy-agenda/ ^
  8. O’Donnell, Katy. “Fight Looms over down payment aid to close racial wealth gap.” Politico. May 25, 2021. Accessed June 24, 2021. https://www.politico.com/news/2021/05/25/housing-assistance-racial-wealth-gap-490617 ^
  9. “Membership.” National Housing Conference. Accessed June 24, 2021. https://nhc.org/membership/ ^
  10. “Our Members.” National Housing Conference. Accessed June 24, 2021. https://nhc.org/membership/our-members/ ^
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Nonprofit Information

  • Accounting Period: December - November
  • Tax Exemption Received: March 1, 2000

  • Available Filings

    Period Form Type Total revenue Total functional expenses Total assets (EOY) Total liabilities (EOY) Unrelated business income? Total contributions Program service revenue Investment income Comp. of current officers, directors, etc. Form 990
    2019 Dec Form 990 $1,659,034 $1,796,878 $576,409 $270,397 N $1,317,159 $483,466 $46 $250,386 PDF
    2018 Dec Form 990 $1,391,248 $1,421,978 $578,969 $123,113 Y $1,245,175 $260,498 $36 $230,264 PDF
    2017 Dec Form 990 $1,302,853 $1,980,187 $804,494 $317,908 N $1,022,852 $281,386 $181 $325,180
    2016 Dec Form 990 $1,261,013 $2,393,752 $1,692,210 $528,290 N $1,017,851 $241,286 $445 $202,332 PDF
    2015 Dec Form 990 $2,819,580 $2,286,589 $2,716,664 $420,584 N $2,665,235 $139,953 $642 $199,043 PDF
    2014 Dec Form 990 $3,090,620 $2,466,601 $2,224,952 $462,443 N $2,869,665 $206,674 $631 $190,086 PDF
    2013 Dec Form 990 $2,015,408 $1,944,972 $1,224,641 $505,856 N $1,820,157 $7,165 $780 $217,171 PDF
    2012 Dec Form 990 $1,666,085 $1,672,889 $1,136,486 $488,137 N $1,424,738 $50 $655 $187,436 PDF
    2011 Dec Form 990 $2,043,612 $2,562,004 $1,262,625 $607,472 N $1,765,200 $96,569 $2,643 $192,670 PDF
    2010 Dec Form 990 $2,056,149 $2,442,896 $1,993,918 $820,373 N $1,595,616 $376,028 $5,370 $351,504 PDF

    Additional Filings (PDFs)

    National Housing Conference

    1900 M ST NW STE 550
    WASHINGTON, DC 20036-3587