Non-profit

National Low Income Housing Coalition

Website:

nlihc.org/

Location:

WASHINGTON, DC

Tax ID:

52-1089824

Tax-Exempt Status:

501(c)(3)

Budget (2019):

Revenue: $5,014,936
Expenses: $5,454,537
Assets: $9,917,784

Founded:

1979

Type:

Housing Advocacy

The National Low Income Housing Coalition (NLIHC) advocates for increased government spending on housing programs. [1] The group asserts that housing policy should address purported ongoing systemic racism that it claims deprives ethnic minorities of equal opportunities to access housing. [2]

In response to the COVID-19 pandemic, NLIHC advocated for rent forgiveness and a ban on evictions. [3] NLIHC also argued in its 2021 annual report that government subsidies for low-income housing are solely a short-term solution that speculators use to purchase discounted real estate. [4]

Background

The National Low Income Housing Coalition was founded in 1974 by Cushing N. Dolbeare. It is a nonprofit organization that advocates for left-of-center policy that would increase funding for housing programs. [5]

NLIHC researches government spending and policy, arguing that the government should spend as much as possible on the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the USDA Rural Housing Service. [6] It also uses identity politics to support its advocacy, arguing that ongoing systemic racism prevents ethnic minorities from equal opportunities and access to fair housing. [7]

Advocacy

The National Housing Trust Fund is a program under the Department of Housing and Urban Development that supports housing for those determined to be of “extremely low income.” The National Low Income Housing Coalition campaigned for more than twenty years for the creation of the program and advocates for legislation that would increase its funding. The fund had over $693 million in funding for 2021 that the HUD distributes to states. [8] [9]

In its 2021 annual report, National Low Income Housing Coalition argues that tax credits and subsidies for the development of low-income housing are used to make expensive property more affordable in the short term, but such properties generally return to the market price once the subsidy ends. [10]

End Rental Arrears to Stop Evictions (ERASE) is a campaign led by NLIHC that advocates for legislation to government funding that would eliminate rental indebtedness that is allegedly caused by the COVID-19 pandemic. It also campaigns for legislation that would end evictions as well as create a long-term plan for the government to fund housing for all homeless people. [11]

Financials

For 2019, the National Low Income Housing Project reported $4.1 million in contributions, $5.0 million in total revenue, and $9.9 million in total assets. [12] [13] It also reported giving $1.2 million in grants, spending $2.4 million on salaries and compensation, and having total expenses of $5.5 million. [14]

Leadership

Marla Newman is the chair for the board of directors for the National Low Income Housing Coalition. [15] She currently serves as the community development director for the city of Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Under her role as community development director, Newman has increased government funding for low-income housing projects. [16]

References

  1. “About Us.” National Low Income Housing Coalition. Accessed March 21, 2022. https://nlihc.org/about. ^
  2. “Racial Equity and Fair Housing.” National Low Income Housing Coalition. Accessed March 21, 2022. https://nlihc.org/explore-issues/policy-priorities/fair-housing. ^
  3. [1] “Erase Project.” National Low Income Housing Coalition. Accessed March 21, 2022. https://nlihc.org/erase-project. ^
  4. “Here’s One Way States Are Boosting Affordable Housing.” Pew Charitable Trusts. Accessed March 21, 2022. https://www.pewtrusts.org/en/research-and-analysis/blogs/stateline/2022/03/02/heres-one-way-states-are-boosting-affordable-housing ^
  5. “About Us.” National Low Income Housing Coalition. Accessed March 21, 2022. https://nlihc.org/about. ^
  6. [1] “Federal Budget and Spending.” National Low Income Housing Coalition. Accessed March 21, 2022. https://nlihc.org/federal-budget-and-spending. ^
  7. [1] “Racial Equity and Fair Housing.” National Low Income Housing Coalition. Accessed March 21, 2022. https://nlihc.org/explore-issues/policy-priorities/fair-housing. ^
  8. “National Housing Trust Fund.” National Low Income Housing Coalition. Accessed March 21, 2022. https://nlihc.org/explore-issues/projects-campaigns/national-housing-trust-fund. ^
  9. “The Solution.” National Low Income Housing Coalition. Accessed March 21, 2022. https://nlihc.org/explore-issues/why-we-care/solution. ^
  10. “Here’s One Way States Are Boosting Affordable Housing.” Pew Charitable Trusts. Accessed March 21, 2022. https://www.pewtrusts.org/en/research-and-analysis/blogs/stateline/2022/03/02/heres-one-way-states-are-boosting-affordable-housing. ^
  11. “Erase Project.” National Low Income Housing Coalition. Accessed March 21, 2022. https://nlihc.org/erase-project. ^
  12. Return of Organization Exempt from Income Tax (Form 990). National Low Income Housing Coalition. 2019. ^
  13. Return of Organization Exempt from Income Tax (Form 990). National Low Income Housing Coalition. 2019. ^
  14. Return of Organization Exempt from Income Tax (Form 990). National Low Income Housing Coalition. 2019. ^
  15. [1] “NLIHC Board.” National Low Income Housing Coalition. Accessed March 21, 2022. https://nlihc.org/about/nlihc-board. ^
  16. “Winston-Salem Selected to Participate in a National Affordable Housing Pilot Program.” WXII. June 12, 2019. https://www.wxii12.com/article/winston-salem-selected-to-participate-in-a-national-affordable-housing-pilot-program/27948844. ^
  See an error? Let us know!

Nonprofit Information

  • Accounting Period: December - November
  • Tax Exemption Received: May 1, 1979

  • Available Filings

    Period Form Type Total revenue Total functional expenses Total assets (EOY) Total liabilities (EOY) Unrelated business income? Total contributions Program service revenue Investment income Comp. of current officers, directors, etc. Form 990
    2019 Dec Form 990 $5,014,936 $5,454,537 $9,917,784 $1,361,381 N $4,137,565 $587,718 $159,557 $470,484 PDF
    2018 Dec Form 990 $6,134,071 $3,969,619 $9,454,135 $1,020,311 N $5,210,035 $623,615 $166,874 $427,117 PDF
    2017 Dec Form 990 $3,603,085 $3,160,313 $7,732,752 $975,142 N $2,673,057 $579,097 $150,454 $409,223 PDF
    2016 Dec Form 990 $2,315,946 $2,812,376 $6,873,507 $941,502 N $1,392,569 $441,750 $135,948 $444,173
    2015 Dec Form 990 $3,611,298 $2,728,198 $7,390,540 $928,102 N $2,724,398 $476,986 $150,468 $365,680 PDF
    2014 Dec Form 990 $2,475,069 $2,568,689 $6,711,775 $537,381 N $1,217,893 $539,384 $170,011 $188,303 PDF
    2013 Dec Form 990 $2,020,565 $2,966,837 $7,030,413 $336,610 N $865,595 $735,970 $167,923 $187,782 PDF
    2012 Dec Form 990 $2,515,483 $2,361,682 $7,288,734 $314,076 N $1,629,872 $714,558 $203,548 $180,615 PDF
    2011 Dec Form 990 $2,193,331 $2,560,191 $6,497,903 $236,046 N $1,105,244 $741,724 $309,040 $181,284 PDF

    Additional Filings (PDFs)

    National Low Income Housing Coalition

    1000 VERMONT AVE NW STE 500
    WASHINGTON, DC 20005-4969