Non-profit

Evangelical Environmental Network (EEN)

Location:

INDIANAPOLIS, IN

Tax ID:

23-2827214

Tax-Exempt Status:

501(c)(3)

Budget (2015):

Revenue: $778,678
Expenses: $669,358
Assets: $105,715

Type:

Environmentalist Advocacy Organization

Formation:

1993 [34]

The Evangelical Environmental Network (EEN) is a 501(c)3[1] non-profit organization used to message left-of-center policy issues to otherwise conservative-leaning Christians.[2] EEN was founded in 1993,[3] and officially formed as a 501(c)3 in 2004.[4] EEN, as of 2014, had total revenue of $948,968, expenditures of $957,054 and ran a negative fund balance of $23,521.[5]

The current president of EEN is the Reverend Mitch Hescox.[6] Hescox describes his work as messaging to Christian evangelicals concerned about climate change and other environmental issues.[7] The board members of EEN are also active. In 2012, Dr. Emilio Marrero, the Chairman of the EEN board, wrote an op-ed about an EEN campaign called What Would Jesus Drive?[8] The campaign was used to promote higher fuel standards. Leroy Barber, another board member of EEN, also has stated that the very liberal city of Portland, Oregon “celebrates whiteness” and is the center of racist culture.[9]

The group is substantially funded by progressive environmentalist donor foundations. EEN received $1.25 million, between 2008 and 2013, from the Marisla Foundation, Rockefeller Brothers Fund and the Energy Foundation.[10] The Rockefeller Brothers Fund and the Energy Foundation are funded in part by the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation.[11][12]

History

Founding, Early Associations

EEN was founded in 1993 by the joint action of two organizations, the Evangelicals for Social Action (ESA) and World Vision.[13] EEN has branded much of their work under the mantra of “Creation Care.” “Creation Care”, according to EEN, means stopping all activities that can be deemed harmful to the environment.[14]

EEN has been described as an influential organization founded by Ronald J. Sider,[15] a well known activist in the environmental movement.[16]  Ron Sider has called for socialized medicine, a carbon trading program and an increase in the minimum wage. EEN tactics have also been described as attempts to, “capitalize on the conservative commitment to ‘family values,’ (by) launch(ing) a “Healthy Families, Healthy Environment” campaign in 2001.”[17]

Noah’s Ark, Endangered Species Act

In 1996, EEN collaborated with World Vision and ESA to defend the Endangered Species Act from Republican-backed reforms when it was due for reauthorization. During the media campaign the then Outreach Coordinator of the ESA described the work. “(W)e circulate radio scripts to religious radio stations to highlight the activities of creation care. (We) started to look at a broad range of laws in our land that are under attack and tried to decide is there any reason why a Christian would want to voice a biblical opinion about these laws.”[18]

Present Activities

Messaging to Evangelical Conservatives

EEN claims a network of 80 evangelical organizations that work within the network to promote environmental reforms and policies to evangelical Christians. Pastor Hescox, the current president of EEN, has been a strong advocate of ending “energy poverty” by showing the cost of energy through public health costs. Hescox believes that because poorer populations do not have access to “sustainable” clean energy that they tend to suffer more than other populations.[19]

EEN uses billboards, radio, TV and emails to message environmental issues to evangelicals.[20] In 2012, EEN applauded a vote on a bill in the U.S. Senate that rejected a measure to lighten Mercury and Air Toxic Standards.[21] The bill would have rolled back the measures, which opponents have said could cause power plants to shut down and reliability of the power grid to suffer.[22]

In EEN’s push for more stringent environmental regulations and policies they attempt to center the advocacy around the message of “Creation Care.” The effort by EEN is also to get environmental advocacy away from generally more liberal demographics.[23] EEN has promoted campaigns like “Healthy Families, Health Environment” and “What Would Jesus Drive.”[24] EEN also tailors environmental advocacy as a “pro-life” issue. In 2014, EEN distributed a signature petition in Florida to convince Governor Rick Scott (R) to act on global warming because of his “pro-life” stance.[25]

In 2017, Hescox, working with the Partnership for Responsible Growth, ran a series of TV ads advocating putting a price on carbon emissions.[26] Critics have stated this would in fact hurt the poorest populations by increasing the price of basic energy needs like power, water and fuel.[27]

Political Association with Democratic Activities

While over the past few years Mitch Hescox has tried to distance EEN from traditional Democratic policy stances (even calling the Sierra Club “a bunch of weirdos”)[28], EEN is directly connected to Democratic operatives used to message policies to Democratic demographics. In EEN’s 2014 Form 990, they spent $138,000[29] on “Media Consulting” with Devine Mulvey Longabaugh, who describe themselves as a, “Democratic media consulting firm.”[30]

Devine Mulvey Longabaug (DML) can be found on the Democratic National Committee’s preferred “Supplier Diversity List.”[31] DML also lists former Vice President Al Gore, former Secretary of State John Kerry, Senator Bernie Sanders (I-Vermont)[32] as clients. DML also represents the League of Conservation Voters, which was founded by David Brower, the Sierra Club’s first Executive Director.[33]

References

  1. “Evangelical Environmental Network .” We2o.org. Accessed June 13, 2017. https://we2o.org/charity/evangelical-environmental-network.
  2. Jeffery Smith. April 28, 1997.”High Country News.” Evangelical Christians preach a green gospel. April 28, 1997. Accessed June 13, 2017. http://www.hcn.org/issues/108/3395.
  3. “The Forum on Religion and Ecology at Yale.” Evangelical Environmental Network (EEN) | Engaged Projects | Christianity | Religion | Yale Forum on Religion and Ecology. Accessed June 13, 2017. http://fore.yale.edu/religion/christianity/projects/evangelical_envt/.
  4. LLC, CitizenAudit.org. CitizenAudit.org – EVANGELICAL ENVIRONMENTAL NETWORK. Accessed June 13, 2017. https://www.citizenaudit.org/organization/232827214/EVANGELICAL ENVIRONMENTAL NETWORK/.
  5. “Form 990 – Evangelical Environmental Network.” Guidestar.org FORM 990 – Evangelical Environmental Network. Accessed June 13, 2017. http://www.guidestar.org/FinDocuments/2014/232/827/2014-232827214-0c28986b-9.pdf.
  6. “Evangelical Environmental Network Staff.” Evangelical Environmental Network. Accessed June 13, 2017. http://www.creationcare.org/staff.
  7. Pathé, Simone. “Evangelicals Make Environmental Issues About ‘Caring for God’s Creation'” Roll Call. December 01, 2015. Accessed June 13, 2017. http://www.rollcall.com/news/home/ahead-paris-climate-talks-evangelical-environmentalists-wage-fight-home.
  8. Op-Ed, PennLive. “We should embrace higher fuel standards.” PennLive.com. August 23, 2012. Accessed June 13, 2017. http://www.pennlive.com/editorials/index.ssf/2012/08/we_should_embrace_higher_fuel.html.
  9. Oregonian/OregonLive, Melissa Binder | The. “Portland is racist and white Christians need to get involved, faith leaders say.” OregonLive.com. February 22, 2016. Accessed June 13, 2017. http://www.oregonlive.com/faith/2016/02/portland_has_a_race_problem_an.html.
  10. “Millions spent to sell evangelicals on ‘climate change'” OneNewsNow.com. June 21, 2015. Accessed June 13, 2017. https://www.onenewsnow.com/church/2015/06/21/millions-spent-to-sell-evangelicals-on-climate-change.
  11. “William and Flora Hewlett Foundation Grants.” Grants. 2016. Accessed June 13, 2017. http://www.hewlett.org/grants/?search=Rockefeller&search_year=2016&search_program=21943.
  12. “William and Flora Hewlett Foundation Grants.” Grants. 2016. Accessed June 13, 2017. “William and Flora Hewlett Foundation Grants.” Grants. 2016. Accessed June 13, 2017. http://www.hewlett.org/grants/?search=Rockefeller&search_year=2016&search_program=21943.
  13. “The Forum on Religion and Ecology at Yale.” Evangelical Environmental Network (EEN) | Engaged Projects | Christianity | Religion | Yale Forum on Religion and Ecology. Accessed June 13, 2017. http://fore.yale.edu/religion/christianity/projects/evangelical_envt/.
  14. “Why Creation Care Matters.” Evangelical Environmental Network. March 22, 2016. Accessed June 13, 2017. https://creationcare2015.wordpress.com/creation-care-resources/why-creation-care.matters/.
  15. [1] Larsen, Richard, Phd. “Evangelical Environmental Network.” Evangelical Environmental Network – Christianity – Larsen. Accessed June 13, 2017. http://users.clas.ufl.edu/bron/PDF–Christianity/Larsen–Evangelical Enviro Network.pdf.
  16. Swartz, David. “Ron sider: Pioneer of the Evangelical Left.” Anxious Bench. July 09, 2013. Accessed June 14, 2017. http;//www.patheos.com/blogs/anxiousbench/2013/07/ron-sider-pioneer-of-the-evangelical-left/.
  17. Larsen, Richard, Phd. “Evangelical Environmental Network.” Evangelical Environmental Network – Christianity – Larsen. Accessed June 13, 2017. http://users.clas.ufl.edu/bron/PDF–Christianity/Larsen–Evangelical Enviro Network.pdf.
  18. “Reverend Stan LeQuire Talks About The Evangelical Environmental Network.” Welcome to Environmental Review – Archives – 2004. June 1996. Accessed June 13, 2017. http://www.environmentalreview.org/archives/vol03/lequire.html.
  19. Hescox, Mitchell. “A Discussion with Reverend Mitchell Hescox.” Berkley Center for Religion, Peace and World Affairs. August 29, 2012. Accessed June 13, 2017. https://berkleycenter.georgetown.edu/interviews/a-discussion-with-reverend-mitchell-hescox.
  20. Hescox, Mitch. “Congress Stops Subsidizing the Utility Industry with Children’s Health.” Sojourners. June 20, 2012. Accessed June 13, 2017. https://sojo.net/articles/congress-stops-subsidizing-utility-industry-children-s-health.
  21. Hescox, Mitch. “Congress Stops Subsidizing the Utility Industry with Children’s Health.” Sojourners. June 20, 2012. Accessed June 13, 2017. https://sojo.net/articles/congress-stops-subsidizing-utility-industry-children-s-health.
  22. “Potential Reliability Impacts of EPA’s Proposed Clean Power Plan.” North American Electric Reliability Corporation. November 2014. Accessed June 13, 2017. ntial Reliability Impacts of EPA’s Proposed Clean Power Plan.
  23. Dallas, Kelsey. “Evangelical Christian pastors frame environmentalism in religious terms.” Effingham Herald. October 23, 2014. Accessed June 13, 2017. http://www.effinghamherald.net/archives/28785/.
  24. Larsen, Richard, Phd. “Evangelical Environmental Network.” Evangelical Environmental Network – Christianity – Larsen. Accessed June 13, 2017. http://users.clas.ufl.edu/bron/PDF–Christianity/Larsen–Evangelical Enviro Network.pdf.
  25. Valentine, Katie. “Evangelical Group: Climate Change Is A ‘Pro-Life’ Issue.” ThinkProgress. May 20, 2014. Accessed June 13, 2017. https://thinkprogress.org/evangelical-group-climate-change-is-a-pro-life-issue-9fdd2677d04b.
  26. Beemer, Carolyn. “How to get the conservative climate message to Trump? Put it on TV.” Public Radio International. May 1, 2017. Accessed June 13, 2017. https://www.pri.org/stories/2017-05-01/how-get-conservative-climate-message-trump-put-it-tv.
  27. Lomborg, Bjorn. “How green policies hurt the poor.” The Spectator. April 03, 2014. Accessed June 13, 2017. https://www.spectator.co.uk/2014/04/let-them-eat-carbon-credits/.
  28. Root, Tik. “How an evangelical movement could push Washington to tackle global warming.” Newsweek. May 27, 2016. Accessed June 13, 2017. http://www.newsweek.com/2016/03/18/creation-care-evangelical-christianity-climate-change-434865.html.
  29. “Form 990 – Evangelical Environmental Network.” Guidestar.org FORM 990 – Evangelical Environmental Network. Accessed June 13, 2017.
  30. “About.” Devine Mulvey Longabaugh. Accessed June 13, 2017. http://dmlmessage.com/about/.
  31. “DNC Supplier Diversity List.” Democrats.org. Accessed June 13, 2017. http://directory.democrats.org/devine-mulvey-longabaugh/.
  32. “Clients.” Devine Mulvey Longabaugh. Accessed June 13, 2017. http://dmlmessage.com/clients/.
  33. “Who Was David Brower.” The David Brower Center. Accessed June 13, 2017. https://browercenter.org/about/who-was-david-brower/.
  34. IRS determination as 501(c)3 non-profit organization in 2004.

Directors, Employees & Supporters

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Nonprofit Information

  • Accounting Period: December - November
  • Tax Exemption Received: November 1, 2004

  • Available Filings

    Period Form Type Total revenue Total functional expenses Total assets (EOY) Total liabilities (EOY) Unrelated business income? Total contributions Program service revenue Investment income Comp. of current officers, directors, etc. Form 990
    2015 Dec Form 990 $778,678 $669,358 $105,715 $19,916 N $778,676 $0 $2 $118,938 PDF
    2014 Dec Form 990 $948,968 $957,054 $12,883 $36,404 N $948,838 $122 $8 $126,090
    2013 Dec Form 990 $531,470 $547,010 $5,126 $20,561 N $530,704 $744 $22 $109,348 PDF
    2012 Dec Form 990 $848,769 $897,763 $12,955 $12,850 N $848,213 $535 $21 $86,769 PDF
    2011 Dec Form 990 $631,255 $783,007 $85,710 $36,611 N $628,946 $2,228 $81 $82,492 PDF

    Additional Filings (PDFs)

    Evangelical Environmental Network (EEN)

    9365 COUNSELORS ROW STE 200
    INDIANAPOLIS, IN 46240-6418