Non-profit

Business & Human Rights Resource Centre

Website:

www.business-humanrights.org/

Tax ID:

20-0829209

Tax-Exempt Status:

501(c)(3)

Budget (2019):

Revenue: $3,158,949
Expenses: $2,903,434
Assets: $954,306

Location:

New York, New York and London, England

Type:

Global human rights research and advocacy

Founded:

2002

Executive Director:

Philip Bloomer

Business and Human Rights Resource Centre (BHRRC) is an advocacy organization that researches alleged human rights abuses by major businesses. BHRRC has offices in New York City and London 1 as well as regional researchers in 17 countries. 2

BHRRC’s core work includes maintaining a database and website that tracks and publishes companies’ human rights policies and performance, distributing reports relating to alleged human rights abuses, and providing companies with an opportunity to respond to allegations of human rights abuses. 3

BHRRC also has focus programs that target human rights abuse in the clothing and textiles, extractives, hotels, and technology industries. 4

Many left-of-center foundations have donated to BHRRC in 2020 and 2021, including Ford Foundation and Open Society Foundations.

Background

Business and Human Rights Resource Centre was founded by international human rights lawyer Chris Avery in 2002. It is focused on creating transparency and accountability on alleged human rights abuse by companies. 5

BHRRC has regional researchers located in 17 countries. 6 The BHRRC website is in 11 languages 7 and stores news and allegations relating to the human rights impact of more than 20,000 companies globally in the apparel, extractives, hotels, and technology sectors. 8

BHRRC approaches companies directly asking for responses to alleged human rights abuse. 9

Programs

Business and Human Rights Resource Centre’s core work includes maintaining a database and website that tracks and publishes companies’ human rights policies and performance, distributing reports relating to alleged human rights abuses, engaging with companies on human rights issues, and providing companies with an opportunity to respond to allegations of human rights abuses. 10

Its strategic plan for 2021 through 2024 identifies three priority programs. 11

Know the Chain

Know the Chain is a BHRRC initiative to rank companies on their efforts to eliminate forced labor from their global supply chains and publish sector specific benchmarks to provide transparency and accountability and to impact investor decisions. 12

BHRRC published a report on continued forced labor risks in the supply chains of Australian businesses four years after anti-modern-day-slavery legislation was passed. 13

A focus program on global supply chains in the apparel sector researches labor rights and worker conditions and works to promote worker organizing in the sector. BHRRC created 275 apparel company dashboards to provide unions and labor rights advocates with information on the treatment of garment workers in the apparel supply chains. 14

Weather-Dependent Energy

BHRRC has focused on the transition to environmentalist-aligned energy because it has created a large human rights impact, specifically to indigenous people. 15

In 2021, BHRRC reported on 61 human rights abuse allegations against 28 mining companies associated with the transition from fossil fuels to “green” energy. 16

Technology

BHRRC also focuses on human rights risks in technology, including surveillance technologies and discrimination due to the use of algorithms on technology platforms. 17

FIFA World Cup 2022

Business and Human Rights Resource Centre has focused on Qatar and the impact the 2022 FIFA World Cup has had on migrant workers from East Africa and Asia. BHRRC has identified thousands of instances of risk to workers due to health and safety failures, non-payment of wages, racial discrimination, and modern slavery. 18

BHRRC published a report that found evidence of widespread exploitation of migrant hotel workers. In November 2021, BHRRC launched a Qatar World Cup Parallel Portal that publishes data on abuse allegations associated with the 2022 World Cup. 19

Financials

Business and Human Rights Resource Centre’s 2020 tax return indicates a revenue of $3,137,943 and expenses of $3,543,436. 20 According to the 2020 tax return almost two million dollars was spent on core work, the Know the Chain program, and the Labor Rights in the Apparel Sector program. 21

Donors and Partners

Private liberal foundations provide the majority of donations to Business & Human Rights Resource Centre. 22  Foundations that have donated to BHRRC in 2020 and 2021 include Ford Foundation, Heinrich Boell Foundation, Laudes Foundation, National Endowment for Democracy, Oak Foundation, Omidyar Network, Open Society Foundations, Wellspring Philanthropic Fund, W. K. Kellogg Foundation, and World Resources Institute. 23

BHRRC has partnerships with EarthRights International, International Corporate Accountability Roundtable, and The Institute for Multi-Stakeholder Initiative Integrity 24 and is a member of Namati, a left-of-center legal advocacy group. 25

Leadership

Philip Bloomer is executive director of Business and Human Rights Resource Centre and is based in London, England. 26 He became executive director in 2013 when founder Chris Avery retired. Previously, Bloomer worked at several human rights policy and advocacy organizations in the United Kingdom as well as in Latin America. 27

Patricia Surak is deputy director based in New York, New York. 28 Surak has been with BHRRC since 2009. 29 Previously, Surak was responsible for fundraising for several nonprofit organizations including Doctors Without Borders and Catholic Relief Services. 30

Chris Avery founded BHRRC in 2002 and was director until he retired in September 2013. 31 Previously, Avery was a consultant on international human rights. 32

Board members include activist Shawna Bader-Blau who leads the American Center for International Labor Solidarity; Heather Grady, who is vice president at Rockefeller Philanthropy Advisors; Kirsty Jenkinson, who was previously a director at World Resources Institute; Chris Jochnick, who previously led the private sector work of Oxfam America; and Seema Joshi, who is an executive at Amnesty International. 33

References

  1. “About Us.” Business & Human Rights Resource Centre. Accessed November 20, 2022.  https://www.business-humanrights.org/en/about-us/
  2. “Meet the Team.” Business & Human Rights Resource Centre. Accessed November 20, 2022. https://www.business-humanrights.org/en/about-us/meet-the-team/
  3. Business & Human Rights Resource Centre. Return of Organization Exempt From Income Tax. (Form 990 – Part III). 2020.
  4. “Companies.” Business & Human Rights Resource Centre. Accessed November 20, 2022. https://www.business-humanrights.org/en/companies/
  5. “Christopher L. Avery.” Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs. Accessed November 22, 2022. https://www.carnegiecouncil.org/people/christopher-l-avery
  6. “Meet the Team.” Business & Human Rights Resource Centre. Accessed November 20, 2022. https://www.business-humanrights.org/en/about-us/meet-the-team/
  7. “About Us.” Business & Human Rights Resource Centre. Accessed November 20, 2022.  https://www.business-humanrights.org/en/about-us/
  8. “Companies.” Business & Human Rights Resource Centre. Accessed November 20, 2022. https://www.business-humanrights.org/en/companies/
  9. “About Us.” Business & Human Rights Resource Centre. Accessed November 20, 2022.  https://www.business-humanrights.org/en/about-us/
  10. [1] Business & Human Rights Resource Centre. Return of Organization Exempt From Income Tax (Form 990). 2020.
  11. “Our priority programmes for 2021-2024.” Business & Human Rights Resource Centre Strategic Plan 2021-24. Accessed November 20, 2022. https://media.business-humanrights.org/media/documents/Strategic_Plan_2021-24.pdf
  12. “About Us.” Know the Chain. Accessed November 22, 2022. https://knowthechain.org/about-us/
  13. “Australia’s modern slavery law not working, report says.” Aljazeera. November 17, 2022. Accessed November 22, 2022. https://www.aljazeera.com/economy/2022/11/17/australias-modern-slavery-law-not-working-report-says
  14. “Labor Rights.” Business & Human Rights Resource Centre. Accessed November 23, 2022. https://www.business-humanrights.org/en/big-issues/labour-rights/
  15. “Our priority programmes for 2021-2024.” Business & Human Rights Resource Centre Strategic Plan 2021-24. Accessed November 22, 2022. https://media.business-humanrights.org/media/documents/Strategic_Plan_2021-24.pdf
  16. Ed Stoddard. “NGO tracks 61 new human rights abuse allegations against 28 mining firms in 2021.” Daily Maverick. May 4, 2022. Accessed November 22, 2022. https://www.dailymaverick.co.za/article/2022-05-04-ngo-tracks-61-new-human-rights-abuse-allegations-against-28-mining-firms-in-2021/
  17. “Our priority programmes for 2021-2024.” Business & Human Rights Resource Centre Strategic Plan 2021-24. Accessed November 22, 2022. https://media.business-humanrights.org/media/documents/Strategic_Plan_2021-24.pdf
  18. “Qatar World Cup Parallel Portal.” Business & Human Rights Resource Centre. Accessed November 20, 2022. https://www.business-humanrights.org/en/from-us/fifa-world-cup-qatar-2022-parallel-portal/
  19. [1] Pete Pattisson. “‘We have fallen into a trap’: Qatar’s World Cup dream is a nightmare for hotel staff.” The Guardian. November 18, 2021. Accessed November 20, 2022. https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2021/nov/18/we-have-fallen-into-a-trap-for-hotel-staff-qatar-world-cup-dream-is-a-nightmare
  20. Business & Human Rights Resource Centre. Return of Organization Exempt From Income Tax (Form 990). 2020.
  21. Business & Human Rights Resource Centre. Return of Organization Exempt From Income Tax (Form 990). 2020.
  22. “Partners & Endorsements.” Business & Human Rights Resource Centre. Accessed November 17, 2022. https://www.business-humanrights.org/en/about-us/partners-endorsements/
  23. Financial Report 2020-21. Business & Human Rights Resource Centre. Accessed November 22, 2022. https://media.business-humanrights.org/media/documents/BHRRC_Annual_Financial_Report_2020-21_signed.pdf
  24. “Partners & Endorsements.” Business & Human Rights Resource Centre. Accessed November 22, 2022. https://www.business-humanrights.org/en/about-us/partners-endorsements/
  25. “Members.” Namati. Accessed November 20, 2022. https://namati.org/network/members/
  26. “Meet the Team.” Business & Human Rights Resource Centre. Accessed November 20, 2022. https://www.business-humanrights.org/en/about-us/meet-the-team/
  27. “Business & Human Rights Resource Centre US LTD.” Guidestar. Accessed November 22, 2022. https://www.guidestar.org/profile/20-0829209
  28. “Meet the Team.” Business & Human Rights Resource Centre. Accessed November 20, 2022. https://www.business-humanrights.org/en/about-us/meet-the-team/
  29. “Patricia Surak.” LinkedIn. Accessed November 22, 2022. https://www.linkedin.com/in/patricia-surak-44741519/
  30. “Meet the Team.” Business & Human Rights Resource Centre. Accessed November 20, 2022. https://www.business-humanrights.org/en/about-us/meet-the-team/
  31. “Meet the Team.” Business & Human Rights Resource Centre. Accessed November 20, 2022. https://www.business-humanrights.org/en/about-us/meet-the-team/
  32. “Christopher Avery.” LinkedIn. Accessed November 22, 2022. https://www.linkedin.com/in/christopher-avery-9a9aa3a/
  33. “Our Board.” Business & Human Rights Resource Centre. Accessed November 22, 2022. https://www.business-humanrights.org/en/about-us/our-board/
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Nonprofit Information

  • Accounting Period: March - February
  • Tax Exemption Received: October 1, 2004

  • Available Filings

    Period Form Type Total revenue Total functional expenses Total assets (EOY) Total liabilities (EOY) Unrelated business income? Total contributions Program service revenue Investment income Comp. of current officers, directors, etc. Form 990
    2019 Mar Form 990 $3,158,949 $2,903,434 $954,306 $85,368 N $3,158,949 $0 $0 $308,914 PDF
    2018 Mar Form 990 $1,914,102 $2,010,397 $700,914 $46,762 N $1,914,102 $0 $0 $294,343 PDF
    2017 Mar Form 990 $2,131,938 $1,484,420 $797,209 $92,976 N $2,131,938 $0 $0 $196,140 PDF
    2016 Mar Form 990 $1,518,075 $1,795,180 $149,691 $34,753 N $1,518,075 $0 $0 $79,883 PDF
    2015 Mar Form 990 $1,346,117 $1,512,457 $426,796 $36,494 N $1,346,117 $0 $0 $73,585 PDF
    2014 Mar Form 990 $1,173,932 $733,573 $593,136 $34,510 N $1,173,932 $0 $0 $71,448 PDF
    2013 Mar Form 990 $592,868 $566,675 $152,778 $24,329 N $592,867 $0 $1 $70,754 PDF
    2012 Mar Form 990 $581,305 $0 $126,586 $16,316 N $581,303 $0 $2 $0 PDF
    2011 Mar Form 990 $501,486 $458,952 $160,831 $44,335 N $501,474 $0 $12 $57,979 PDF

    Additional Filings (PDFs)