Non-profit

American Psychological Association

This is a logo for American Psychological Association. (link)
Website:

www.apa.org/

Location:

WASHINGTON, DC

Tax ID:

53-0205890

Tax-Exempt Status:

501(c)(3)

Budget (2018):

Revenue: $131,782,896
Expenses: $132,802,951
Assets: $245,291,932

Formation:

1892

Type:

Psychological and Behavioral Science Professionals Advocacy Association

President:

Dr. Arthur C. Evans, Jr.

The American Psychological Association (APA) is the largest scientific and professional organization representing psychology and psychologists in the United States. [1] APA is active in left-of-center policy advocacy and grantmaking activities[2] on behalf of its 121,000 members[3] and exerts powerful influence over the psychology profession as the leading accreditation body for undergraduate and graduate psychology programs, internships, and certifications. [4]

APA has a long history of involvement with left-of-center politics, electing self-described “democratic socialist” John Dewey as its president in 1899. [5] [6] In recent years, APA leadership has claimed current scientific practices are “dominated by white supremacy,”[7] called for the need to address the “procedural justice approach” in the U.S. legal system,[8]  encouraged members to organize to find ways to eliminate “organizational and systemic racism,” [9] called greenhouse gas emissions a “psychological problem,”[10] used its guidelines to call for the application of critical race theory,[11] and claimed boys and men as a group hold “privilege” based on gender. [12]

APA operates the children’s book publisher Magination Press,[13] whose titles address topics including perceived racial injustice and police brutality towards minorities,[14] a kid’s guide to COVID-19 and lockdowns which called some of the pandemic’s big changes are nice,[15]  and two books promoting LGBT pride[16] and “rainbow families.” [17]

In 2019, APA reported $131,891,890 of revenue, including $118,493,750 in program service revenue and  $1,775,724 from government grants. [18] That same year, APA’s public interest directorate promoted the application of psychological knowledge to increase so-called “social justice” and managed $1.9 million in federal and foundation grants to address issues including lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender adult and adolescent health; sexual orientation and gender diversity; racial and ethnic minorities; and socioeconomic status. [19]

Arthur Evans, Jr., is APA’s chief executive officer and executive vice president. [20] In 2019, he said that “equity, diversity, and inclusion” will be woven into the fabric of APA. [21] Jennifer Kelly is APA’s president. [22]

History and Leadership

The American Psychological Association was founded in 1892[23] and was granted tax-exempt status in 1940. [24] In 1899, APA elected self-described “democratic socialist”[25] John Dewey as president. He opposed enlightenment concepts of individualism enshrined by negative rights. [26] In the 1960s, the APA joined with state governments to form the Association of State and Provincial Psychology Boards[27] and supported the left-wing “Great Society” program of President Lyndon Johnson (D), which funded psychological research through Project Head Start. [28]

A 2012 survey of 800 psychologists revealed the group’s left-leaning tendencies have continued, with only six percent of respondents identifying as conservative. [29]

Currently APA has 121,000 members[30] and consists of 54 divisions that represent different scientific and professional interests that operate independently from APA’s organizational structure. [31]

Arthur Evans, Jr., is APA’s chief executive officer and executive vice president. [32] Evans has said that “equity, diversity, and inclusion” will be woven into the fabric of APA [33] and that he wants APA’s voice to be known on issues such as racism and policing practices. [34] APA president Jennifer Kelly also supports “equity” as one of APA’s driving forces. [35]

Other members of APA’s leadership also engage in political activism. In April 2021, APA’s chief science officer claimed current scientific practices only deliver part of the truth because they are “dominated by white supremacy,”[36] and in 2020, APA’s former president Sandra Shullman stated the United States was living through a “racism pandemic.” [37]

Political Activism

Racial Issues

In June 2021, APA identified schools as a critical setting for teaching about race and racism from a very young age and discussed how to approach this issue with various psychologists. [38] In an article on APA’s website describing possible approaches, APA members shared beliefs that “U.S. history is structured to uphold racial differences” [39] and explained the development of an eight-session intervention called the Identity Project which was co-developed with the controversial Southern Poverty Law Center’s Learning for Justice (formerly Teaching Tolerance) program to “equip educators for equity.” [40]

In 2020, then-APA president Sandra Shullman said “racism is inherent in scientific approaches”[41] and stated the U.S. is living through a “racism pandemic.” [42] APA quickly called for “true systemic change in U.S. culture,” advocating for dismantling perceived “institutional racism” to combat this perceived “pandemic.” [43] APA leadership urged its members to discuss so-called “white fragility,” said alleged police brutality has its roots in America’s past,[44] and stood up a task force to craft guidelines on how to leverage psychological insights to conduct “anti-racism training.” [45]

In 2019, APA published its Guidelines on Race and Ethnicity in Psychology, which identifies championing diversity and inclusion as one of APA’s guiding principles. [46] These guidelines include the application of critical race theory and culturally relevant pedagogy,[47] incorporating race and ethnicity into professional activities. [48] This guidance also suggested white psychologists investigate whether or not they enact so-called white privilege consciously or unconsciously through journaling, attending conferences, or trainings focused on racial issues; participating in diversity initiatives; and participating in “affinity groups” [49] or workshops, such as a “white privilege conference.” [50]

Masculinity

In 2018, APA published guidelines for psychological practice with boys and men. [51] This document claims boys and men as a group hold privilege based on gender;[52] defines “masculine ideology” as anti-femininity, achievement, eschewal of the appearance of weakness, and adventure, risk, and violence,” and identifies “white, Christian, male, and middle/upper class” as examples of so-called privilege. [53] This report also says parenting support programs originate from white middle class values and do not recognize other cultural approaches to childrearing. [54]

Other Policy Positions

APA has called greenhouse gas emissions a “psychological problem” as a result of daily decisions that lead to the emission of greenhouse gases;[55] advocated for expanding the government-run portions of the Obamacare (Affordable Care Act) healthcare scheme; expansion of Medicaid; supported a pathway to citizenship for the so-called “DREAMers,” illegal immigrants brought to the U.S. as children;[56] and published a guide for how to deal with so-called “microaggressions” that are indicative of a society which tends to be Eurocentric, masculine, and heterosexual. [57]

Since the 1970s, APA has written or signed amicus briefs for court cases outside of the psychological field. This includes advocating for abortion, fighting against reopening nuclear reactors, advocating for affirmative action, and forcing the Masterpiece Cakeshop in Lakewood, Colorado to bake a cake for a same-sex wedding. [58] [59]

Media Activities

Publishing

APA operates Magination Press, a children’s book press. [60] Its titles include books which address issues including the COVID-19 pandemic[61] and left-wing issues including perceived police brutality towards minority groups[62] and the LGBT movement. [63]

Something Happened in Our Town addresses so-called police brutality and includes language that states the police “shot [a man] because he is black.” This children’s book says that “many whites thought they were better than others and some still think that way;” says police shootings of black men were a “mistake but a part of a pattern;” and insinuates police treat white suspects better than nonwhite suspects. [64] In a video reading of the book on APA’s YouTube channel, the author encourages children to make signs for protest marches as a part of the left wing Black Lives Matter movement or put those signs up in their room or in their yard. [65]

Rainbow, Our First Book of Pride introduces children to the concept of “rainbow families” and same-sex parents. [66] Papa, Daddy and Riley, features a child with “two fathers” going to school and refers to the child’s biological mother as a “belly mommy.” [67] A Kid’s Guide to Coronavirus says superheroes wear masks, despite lack of scientific evidence regarding efficacy of mask-wearing for children, and suggested some of the big societal changes from COVID-19 and the associated government lockdowns were “nice.” [68]

Social Media

APA’s YouTube channel hosts videos and interviews on various left wing topics in addition to more traditional psychology topics. [69] In an interview entitled “The Invisibility of White Privilege,”[70] APA’s guest claims “white people deny they benefit from privilege.” The interview goes on to say “each white denial serves the broader white community” before claiming “white people need to accept policies of redistribution” and stating his belief that “there is a vast amount of work to be done to shift the racial hierarchy in [the United States].” [71]

Additional politically charged APA videos include “How to Cope with Climate Anxiety,”[72] “Why People Believe in Conspiracy Theories,”[73] and “Does Diversity Training Work?”[74]

Funding and Financial Activities

In 2019, APA reported $131,891,890 of revenue, including $118, 493,750 in program service revenue, $1,775,724 from government grants, $23,718,891 from books and journal subscriptions, and $80,193,189 in licensing fees, $4,861,819 in service and application fees, $3,887,334 in membership fees, and $3,707,346 in convention and conference fees. [75] APA’s total revenue in 2019 was nearly identical to its reported $131,782,896 of revenue in 2018. [76]

APA reported $2 million in lobbying from 2016 through 2019. [77] In addition to its reported lobbying activities, APA issues grants to universities, professional associations, and students[78] in the fields of psychology and behavioral science. [79]

References

  1. “APA History.” American Psychological Association. Accessed July 1, 2021. https://www.apa.org/about/apa/archives/apa-history. ^
  2. “American Psychological Association.” Return of Organization Exempt From Income Tax. (Form 990.) 2019. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/display_990/530205890/04_2021_prefixes_52-54%2F530205890_201912_990_2021040217857766. ^
  3. “Impact APA.” American Psychological Association Strategic Plan. American Psychological Association. Accessed July 2, 2021. https://www.apa.org/about/apa/strategic-plan. ^
  4. “Why APA Accredidation Matters.” About Accredidation. American  Psychological Associatio. Accessed July 3, 2021. https://accreditation.apa.org/why-accreditation-matters. ^
  5. “Dewey’s Political Philosophy.” Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Published February 9, 2005. Revised July 26, 2018. Accessed July 3, 2021. https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/dewey-political/. ^
  6. Kazenoff, Harry. “The American Psychological Association Has Lost Its Mind.” Capital Research Center. March 8, 2019. https://capitalresearch.org/article/the-american-psychological-association-has-lost-its-mind/. ^
  7. Andoh, Efua. “Psychology’s urgent need to dismantle racism.” American Psychological Association. Monitor on Psychology. April 2021. Vol. 52, No. 3. https://www.apa.org/monitor/2021/04/cover-dismantle-racism ^
  8. “APA Member Town Hall on the “Racism Pandemic’ Facing Our Nation.” American Psychological Association Youtube Channel. June 5, 2020. Accessed July 3, 2021. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BAoqqeeWRtQ. ^
  9. “APA Member Town Hall on the “Racism Pandemic’ Facing Our Nation.” American Psychological Association Youtube Channel. June 5, 2020. Accessed July 3, 2021. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BAoqqeeWRtQ. ^
  10. Weir, Kirsten. “Climate change is our call to action.” Monitor on Psychology. American Psychological Association. Vol 49, No. 10. November 2018. Accessed July 2, 2021. https://www.apa.org/monitor/2018/11/cover-climate. ^
  11. APA Task Force on Race and Ethnicity Guidelines in Psychology. “APA Guidelines on Race and Ethnicity in Psychology: Promoting Responsiveness and Equity.” American Psychological Association. P. 16. August 2019. Accessed July 2, 2021. https://www.apa.org/about/policy/guidelines-race-ethnicity.pdf. ^
  12. American Psychological Association. Boys and Men Guidelines Group. (2018). APA Guidelines for psychological practice with boys and men. Pg. 1. Accessed July 2, 2021. https://www.apa.org/about/policy/boys-men-practice-guidelines.pdf ^
  13. “Magination Press Children’s Books.” American Psychological Association. Accessed July 3, 2021. https://www.apa.org/pubs/magination/. ^
  14. “Magination Press Story Time – Celano, Collins, and Hazzard Read Something Happened in Our Town.” American Psychological Association YouTube. June 9, 2020. Accessed July 3, 2021. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NjLJQft_i_M&list=PLxf85IzktYWIIKno7USt8THWCAkVCJRmi&index=27. ^
  15. “Magination Press Story Time – Rebecca Growe Reads A Kid’s Guide to Coronavirus.” American Psychological Association YouTube. June 30, 2020. Accessed July 12, 2021. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WkFvSv6MF3A&list=PLxf85IzktYWIIKno7USt8THWCAkVCJRmi&index=24   ^
  16. “Magination Press Story Time – Seamus Kirst Preads Papa, Daddy & Riley.” American Psychological Association. June 23, 2020. Accessed July 3, 2021. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MBxPttiXasE. ^
  17. “Magination Press Story Time – Seamus Kirst Preads Papa, Daddy & Riley.” American Psychological Association. June 23, 2020. Accessed July 3, 2021. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MBxPttiXasE. ^
  18. “American Psychological Association.” Return of Organization Exempt From Income Tax. (Form 990.) 2019. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/display_990/530205890/04_2021_prefixes_52-54%2F530205890_201912_990_2021040217857766. ^
  19. “American Psychological Association.” Return of an Organization Exempt from Income Tax. (Form 990). 2019. https://www.apa.org/pubs/info/reports/2019-form-990.pdf. ^
  20. “Arthur Evans, Jr., PhD.” American Psychological Association. Accessed July 4, 2021. https://www.apa.org/about/apa/senior-staff/evans-bio. ^
  21. Evans, Arthur C. Jr. “APA’s strategic priorities rooted in equity, diversity, inclusion.” American Psychological Association. May 6, 2019. Accessed July 2, 2021. https://www.apa.org/about/apa/strategic-plan/strategic-priorities. ^
  22. Kelly, Jennifer F., PHD, ABPP. “A Message from Dr. Jennifer Kelly, APA’s 2021 President.” National Register of Health Service Psychologists.” February 2021. https://www.nationalregister.org/message-from-jennifer-kelly/. ^
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  24. “American Psychological Association.” GudieStar Profile. Accessed July 1, 2021. https://www.guidestar.org/profile/53-0205890. ^
  25. “Dewey’s Political Philosophy.” Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy. Published February 9, 2005. Revised July 26, 2018. Accessed July 3, 2021. https://plato.stanford.edu/entries/dewey-political/. ^
  26. Kazenoff, Harry. “The American Psychological Association Has Lost Its Mind.” Capital Research Center. March 8, 2019. https://capitalresearch.org/article/the-american-psychological-association-has-lost-its-mind/. ^
  27. “History.” The Association of State and Provincial Psychology Boards. Accessed via Web Archive. July 4, 2021. https://web.archive.org/web/20170426105751/http:/www.asppb.net/?page=History. ^
  28. Kazenoff, Harry. “The American Psychological Association Has Lost Its Mind.” Organization Trends. Capital Research Center. March 8, 2019. Accessed July 4, 2021. https://capitalresearch.org/article/the-american-psychological-association-has-lost-its-mind/. ^
  29. Inbar, Yoel and Lammers, Joris. “Political Diversity in Social and Personal Psychology.” Perspectives on Psychological Science. XX(X)1-9. 2012. http://yoelinbar.net/papers/political_diversity.pdf. ^
  30. “Impact APA.” American Psychological Association Strategic Plan. American Psychological Association. Accessed July 2, 2021. https://www.apa.org/about/apa/strategic-plan. ^
  31. “American Psychological Association.” Return of an Organization Exempt from Income Tax. (Form 990). 2019. https://www.apa.org/pubs/info/reports/2019-form-990.pdf. ^
  32. “Arthur Evans, Jr., PhD.” About APA. American Psychological Association. Accesed July 1, 2021. https://www.apa.org/about/apa/senior-staff/evans-bio. ^
  33. Evans, Arthur C. Jr. “APA’s strategic priorities rooted in equity, diversity, inclusion.” American Psychological Association. May 6, 2019. Accessed July 2, 2021. https://www.apa.org/about/apa/strategic-plan/strategic-priorities. ^
  34. “APA Member Town Hall on the “Racism Pandemic’ Facing Our Nation.” American Psychological Association Youtube Channel. June 5, 2020. Accessed July 3, 2021. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BAoqqeeWRtQ. ^
  35. Kelly, Jennifer F., PHD, ABPP. “A Message from Dr. Jennifer Kelly, APA’s 2021 President.” National Register of Health Service Psychologists.” February 2021. https://www.nationalregister.org/message-from-jennifer-kelly/. ^
  36. Andoh, Efua. “Psychology’s urgent need to dismantle racism.” American Psychological Association. Monitor on Psychology. April 2021. Vol. 52, No. 3. https://www.apa.org/monitor/2021/04/cover-dismantle-racism ^
  37. “’We Are Living in a Racism Pandemic,’ Says APA President.” American Psychological Association. Press Release. May 29, 2020. Accessed July 1, 2021. https://www.apa.org/news/press/releases/2020/05/racism-pandemic. ^
  38. Weir, Kirsten. “Raising anti-racist children.” Monitor on Psychology Feature. Vol. 52. No.4. June 2021. Accessed July 2, 2021. https://www.apa.org/monitor/2021/06/anti-racist-children. ^
  39. Weir, Kirsten. “Raising anti-racist children.” Monitor on Psychology Feature. Vol. 52. No.4. June 2021. Accessed July 2, 2021. https://www.apa.org/monitor/2021/06/anti-racist-children. ^
  40. Weir, Kirsten. “Raising anti-racist children.” Monitor on Psychology Feature. Vol. 52. No.4. June 2021. Accessed July 2, 2021. https://www.apa.org/monitor/2021/06/anti-racist-children. ^
  41. “APA Member Town Hall on the “Racism Pandemic’ Facing Our Nation.” American Psychological Association Youtube Channel. June 5, 2020. Accessed July 3, 2021. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BAoqqeeWRtQ. ^
  42. Abrams, Zara. “APA calls for true systemic change in U.S. culture.” American Psychological Association. Monitor on Psychology. September 1, 2020. Accessed July 1, 2021. https://www.apa.org/monitor/2020/09/systemic-change. ^
  43. Abrams, Zara. “APA calls for true systemic change in U.S. culture.” American Psychological Association. Monitor on Psychology. September 1, 2020. Accessed July 1, 2021. https://www.apa.org/monitor/2020/09/systemic-change. ^
  44. Abrams, Zara. “APA Cls for true stystemic change in U.S. Culture.” Monitor on Psychology. American Psychological Association. September 2020. Pg. 20-23. Accessed July 2, 2021. https://www.apa.org/monitor/2020/2020-09-monitor.pdf. ^
  45. Abrams, Zara. “APA calls for true systemic change in U.S. culture.” American Psychological Association. Monitor on Psychology. September 1, 2020. Accessed July 1, 2021. https://www.apa.org/monitor/2020/09/systemic-change. ^
  46. “APA and APA Services, Inc. Strategic Plan.” American Psychological Association. 2019. Accessed July 2, 2021. https://www.apa.org/about/apa/strategic-plan/impact-apa-strategic-plan.pdf. ^
  47. APA Task Force on Race and Ethnicity Guidelines in Psychology. “APA Guidelines on Race and Ethnicity in Psychology: Promoting Responsiveness and Equity.” American Psychological Association. P. 16. August 2019. Accessed July 2, 2021. https://www.apa.org/about/policy/guidelines-race-ethnicity.pdf. ^
  48. APA Task Force on Race and Ethnicity Guidelines in Psychology. “APA Guidelines on Race and Ethnicity in Psychology: Promoting Responsiveness and Equity.” American Psychological Association. August 2019. Accessed July 2, 2021. https://www.apa.org/about/policy/guidelines-race-ethnicity.pdf. ^
  49. APA Task Force on Race and Ethnicity Guidelines in Psychology. “APA Guidelines on Race and Ethnicity in Psychology: Promoting Responsiveness and Equity.” American Psychological Association. Pg. 14

    August 2019. Accessed July 2, 2021. https://www.apa.org/about/policy/guidelines-race-ethnicity.pdf. ^

  50. APA Task Force on Race and Ethnicity Guidelines in Psychology. “APA Guidelines on Race and Ethnicity in Psychology: Promoting Responsiveness and Equity.” American Psychological Association. Pg. 14 August 2019. Accessed July 2, 2021. https://www.apa.org/about/policy/guidelines-race-ethnicity.pdf. ^
  51. American Psychological Association. Boys and Men Guidelines Group. (2018). APA Guidelines for psychological practice with boys and men. Accessed July 2, 2021. https://www.apa.org/about/policy/boys-men-practice-guidelines.pdf ^
  52. American Psychological Association. Boys and Men Guidelines Group. (2018). APA Guidelines for psychological practice with boys and men. Pg. 1. Accessed July 2, 2021. https://www.apa.org/about/policy/boys-men-practice-guidelines.pdf ^
  53. American Psychological Association. Boys and Men Guidelines Group. (2018). APA Guidelines for psychological practice with boys and men. Pg. 3.  Accessed July 2, 2021. https://www.apa.org/about/policy/boys-men-practice-guidelines.pdf ^
  54. American Psychological Association. Boys and Men Guidelines Group. (2018). APA Guidelines for psychological practice with boys and men. Accessed July 2, 2021. https://www.apa.org/about/policy/boys-men-practice-guidelines.pdf ^
  55. Weir, Kirsten. “Climate change is our call to action.” Monitor on Psychology. American Psychological Association. Vol 49, No. 10. November 2018. Accessed July 2, 2021. https://www.apa.org/monitor/2018/11/cover-climate. ^
  56. “APA Statement on President Trump’s Decision to End DACA.” American Psychological Association Press Release. September 5, 2017. Accessed July 4, 2021. https://www.apa.org/news/press/releases/2017/09/trump-daca. ^
  57. Clay, Rebecca A. “Did you really just say that?” Monitor on Psychology Feature. Vol 48, No. 1. January 2017. Accessed July 2, 2021. https://www.apa.org/monitor/2017/01/microaggressions. ^
  58. “APA Amicus Briefs by Issue.” American Psychological Association. Accessed July 4, 2021. https://www.apa.org/about/offices/ogc/amicus/index-issues. ^
  59. “Brief of the American Psychological Association, National Association of Social Workers, and National Association of Social Workers Colorado Chapter, as Amici Curiae, in Support of Respondents.” No. 16-111. Masterpiece Cakeshop v. Colorado Civi Rights Commission. https://www.apa.org/about/offices/ogc/amicus/cakeshop.pdf. ^
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  72. “How to cope with Climate Anxiety, with Thomas Doherty, PsyD, and Ashlee Cunsolo, Phd.” American Psychological Association YouTube. April 21, 2021. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Hvf191Z_uSI. ^
  73. “Why People Believe in Conspiracy Theories, with Karen Douglas, PhD.” American Psychological Association YouTube. January 13, 2021. Accessed July 3, 2021. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5MgBnl-fe4A. ^
  74. “Does Diversity Training Work? With Calvin Lai, PhD.” American Psychological Association YouTube Channel. November 18, 2020. Accessed July 3, 2021. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tbOBIkT7HMg. ^
  75. “American Psychological Association.” Return of Organization Exempt from Income Tax. (Form 990). 2019. ^
  76. “American Psychological Association.” Return of Organization Exempt from Income Tax. (Form 990). 2019. ^
  77. “American Psychological Association.” Return of Organization Exempt from Income Tax. (Form 990). 2019. Schedule C, Part II-A, Line 2c. ^
  78. “Foundation Grants.” American Psychological Association. Accessed July 4, 2021. https://www.apa.org/apf/funding/grants. ^
  79. “American Psychological Association.” Return of Organization Exempt From Income Tax. (Form 990.) 2019. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/display_990/530205890/04_2021_prefixes_52-54%2F530205890_201912_990_2021040217857766. ^
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Nonprofit Information

  • Accounting Period: December - November
  • Tax Exemption Received: January 1, 1940

  • Available Filings

    Period Form Type Total revenue Total functional expenses Total assets (EOY) Total liabilities (EOY) Unrelated business income? Total contributions Program service revenue Investment income Comp. of current officers, directors, etc. Form 990
    2018 Dec Form 990 $131,782,896 $132,802,951 $245,291,932 $199,379,181 Y $2,332,316 $117,345,638 $2,322,031 $5,862,853 PDF
    2017 Dec Form 990 $128,004,100 $127,299,526 $265,119,671 $207,500,603 Y $2,516,785 $113,464,828 $1,263,922 $6,040,533 PDF
    2016 Dec Form 990 $124,399,386 $123,342,296 $231,306,083 $181,588,019 Y $2,264,563 $111,935,614 $1,379,577 $5,117,503 PDF
    2015 Dec Form 990 $117,818,738 $130,006,885 $230,421,517 $188,332,242 Y $1,948,661 $108,065,276 $1,395,731 $6,084,178 PDF
    2014 Dec Form 990 $130,402,290 $127,511,304 $260,756,298 $201,074,569 Y $1,798,443 $109,444,386 $1,358,673 $6,818,657 PDF
    2013 Dec Form 990 $127,538,836 $119,113,283 $257,045,386 $191,581,742 Y $2,534,834 $107,745,753 $1,132,153 $6,041,809 PDF
    2012 Dec Form 990 $118,809,697 $119,626,891 $236,941,077 $200,894,310 Y $2,785,859 $102,301,209 $1,556,275 $4,815,044 PDF
    2011 Dec Form 990 $130,673,415 $121,361,512 $193,166,631 $162,685,847 Y $3,262,611 $99,052,430 $1,708,859 $4,919,103 PDF

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    American Psychological Association

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