Labor Union

Maryland State and D.C. AFL-CIO

Location:

Annapolis, MD

Tax ID:

52-0691752

Tax-Exempt Status:

501(c)(5)

Budget (2019):

Revenue: $1,120,684
Expenses: $885,333
Assets: $2,102,247

Founded:

1954

President:

Donna Edwards

AFL-CIO

The Maryland State and District of Columbia AFL-CIO (more commonly abbreviated to MDDC AFL-CIO) is a state federation of labor unions affiliated with the American Federation of Labor-Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO), the largest federation of labor unions in the United States. Founded in 1954, MDDC AFL-CIO claims to include more than 500 affiliated local unions in Maryland and Washington, D.C. [1]

The union has supported the implementation of left-of-center labor policy in Maryland, including government-mandated paid sick leave and union reporting requirements for public schools. [2] MDDC AFL-CIO has also long supported the failed effort to implement a $15 minimum wage in Maryland. [3] [4] During the COVID-19 pandemic, MDDC AFL-CIO actively pursued increased workplace regulations and supported expanded state unemployment benefits. [5]

MDDC AFL-CIO has frequently endorsed left-of-center politicians, including some of the most left-wing members of Congress, as measured by their voting records. In 2020, MDDC AFL-CIO endorsed candidates included far-left U.S. Representatives Jamie Raskin (D-MD) and Kweisi Mfume (D-MD) and non-voting Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC). [6] [7] [8] [9]

Donna Edwards is president of MDDC AFL-CIO as of September 2021. Edwards has previously worked as president of several other unions including the American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) Local 112, and she sits on the Northeast Council of the AFL-CIO. [10] [11] Other MDCC AFL-CIO leaders have been affiliated with organizations including Planned Parenthood and the Service Employees International Union (SEIU); a former president of MDDC AFL-CIO called himself “a friend of the CPUSA” at a celebration of the organization’s centenary. [12] [13] [14]

History

Founded in 1954, the Maryland State and District of Columbia AFL-CIO (MDDC AFL-CIO) is a local affiliate of the national American Federation of Labor-Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO), the largest federation of labor unions in the United States. [15]

As of 2021, MDDC AFL-CIO includes more than 500 affiliated local unions and claims to represent more than 340,000 union members in industries including education, trades and construction, health care, transportation, retail and hospitality, the public sector, and other industries. [16]

Legislative Advocacy

The Maryland State and D.C. AFL-CIO (MDDC AFL-CIO) frequently engages in legislative advocacy, pushing for left-of-center labor regulations at the state level. In 2018 in Maryland, the union supported measures including mandated paid sick leave for any employee working at a company with more than 15 workers, regulations to prevent the suspension of educators, and increased funding for state apprenticeship programs. [17]

That same year, MDDC AFL-CIO opposed a measure that sought to grant workers the freedom to choose whether they would join a labor union in industries with collective bargaining agreements in place. In opposition to the bill, the MDDC AFL-CIO sent mailers to union members in the bill’s sponsor’s district, urging them to call their delegate and pressure him to stop introducing right to work legislation. [18]

MDDC AFL-CIO has also supported legislation in Maryland to drastically strengthen the power of labor unions. In April 2018, it supported the passage of Maryland House Bill 811, which mandated that public schools provide a union representative with the name, personal cell phone number, and job position of any new hire within 30 days, regardless of the new hire’s interest in joining the union. The union also worked to pass a similar measure which required all state colleges and universities to provide employee information to unions in a “searchable and analyzable electronic format” within 30 days of new hires. [19]

MDDC AFL-CIO has unsuccessfully called for the implementation of a $15 minimum wage in Maryland for years, though it has pushed successfully for other left-of-center employment policies. [20] In 2018, MDDC AFL-CIO supported a bill which provides up to 60 days of paid parental leave to primary caregivers working in the executive branch of the Maryland government. While decrying tax cuts elsewhere, MDDC AFL-CIO supported a measure which exempted the first $15,000 of retirement income from any taxes, provided that it came from state employment. [21]

In August 2020, MDDC AFL-CIO called for Gov. Larry Hogan (R-MD) to issue an executive order to require the Maryland occupational safety program to adopt new regulations for businesses during the COVID-19 pandemic, such as requiring social distancing and masks in places of work. In an open letter to the governor, MDDC AFL-CIO claimed that “workers of color” were put at risk by the state’s refusal to implement new regulations, despite local authorities having the authorization to shut down unsafe facilities. [22]

MDDC AFL-CIO also supported expanded unemployment benefits throughout the pandemic. The union testified in support of a bill which sought to make unemployment benefits easier to access in Maryland by ensuring that all claims were resolved within eight weeks, increasing staff to answer questions for claimants, and requiring that the Maryland Department of Labor provide claimants with regular status updates. [23]

In August 2021, MDDC AFL-CIO president Donna Edwards again spoke in a meeting of the Maryland Joint Committee on Unemployment Insurance Oversight, alleging that the distribution of unemployment benefits during the COVID-19 pandemic was too slow. [24]

Protests and Initiatives

Aside from its direct legislative efforts, MDDC AFL-CIO frequently leads initiatives in support of left-of-center policy implementation. In 2020 and 2021, MDDC AFL-CIO ran four active grassroots campaigns, encouraging union members to contact representatives and sign petitions in support of striking workers, federal guaranteed paid leave programs, and government-funded universal preschool programs. [25] [26]

Even on issues unrelated to labor, MDDC AFL-CIO has taken action to support left-of-center policy. In 2021, MDDC AFL-CIO set up an automated call system for union members to call their congressional representatives to advocate for left-of-center immigration policy, including permanent legal status for those protected by the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) and temporary protected status (TPS) programs. [27]

MDDC AFL-CIO was active in coordinating efforts to support left-of-center policy during the COVID-19 pandemic. MDDC AFL-CIO supported Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority (WMATA) workers as they went on strike in May 2021 to demand higher pay after being offered a 1 percent raise. [28]

Two months later, MDDC AFL-CIO supported a lawsuit led by unemployed people to prevent Gov. Hogan from ending federal unemployment aid programs designed to help independent contractors and support the long-term unemployed during the COVID-19 pandemic. [29]

After the Maryland Supreme Court prevented Gov. Hogan from ending the aid for at least 10 days, MDDC AFL-CIO president Edwards claimed that the governor was “never justified” in ending the program and called for benefits to continue through September. Edwards further claimed that “unsustainable poverty wages” were keeping people from going back to work, rather than expanded unemployment benefits that eliminated the need to earn money. [30]

MDDC AFL-CIO has also taken far-left positions by passing its own resolutions on political issues. In 2015, the union passed a resolution calling for an end to all travel restrictions from Cuba, a move praised by left-wing and radical-left media outlets including People’s World. [31]

Electoral Advocacy

Maryland State and D.C. AFL-CIO (MDDC AFL-CIO) frequently endorses left-of-center candidates. In the 2018 Maryland gubernatorial election, MDDC AFL-CIO supported Democratic nominee Ben Jealous. Just days after MDDC AFL-CIO announced its endorsement, Jealous was forced to apologize when it was leaked that his campaign account had liked an anti-police tweet stating “[Expletive] Blue Lives Matter and all these dirty [expletive] cops…If you get killed, that’s on you.” Jealous claimed that a staffer had liked the tweet, saying “people make mistakes” and taking no disciplinary action against his staff. MDDC AFL-CIO did not withdraw its endorsement. [32]

In 2020, the union endorsed some of the most far-left members of Congress, as measured by their congressional voting records. These included U.S. Representatives Jamie Raskin (D-MD), who also received the support of the left-wing Progressive Democrats of America; and Kweisi Mfume (D-MD), who ran on a platform including implementing a government-controlled health care system by expanding the Affordable Care Act and increasing the federal minimum wage. The union also endorsed non-voting Del. Eleanor Holmes Norton (D-DC), who has been ranked as the third most left-wing member of Congress based on her voting record. [33] [34] [35] [36]

In 2020, MDDC AFL-CIO also supported Baltimore City Council candidate James Torrence. Councilman Torrence also received support from other left-of-center organizations, including Jews United for Justice and the Baltimore Teachers Union (BTU). [37] Torrence ran on a platform promoting expanded government-controlled housing and increased city-controlled service programs. [38]

Aside from endorsing candidates, MDDC AFL-CIO also provides information to encourage left-of-center voters to staff polling places. In 2020, MDDC AFL-CIO organized the “Labor2020” campaign, a push to encourage members to vote in support of left-of-center candidates during the 2020 election cycle. The campaign also encouraged union workers to get involved with voter registration drives and staff polling sites, calling on union members to sign up to “safeguard our election process. [39]

The organization also publishes resources to assist members in checking voter registration status and publishes an annual “voter information guide.” In 2020, MDDC AFL-CIO aggressively advocated for mail-in voting, calling it “the best choice for union members” and implying that voting on Election Day could be jeopardized by the COVID-19 pandemic. [40]

People and Funding

In 2018, Maryland State and DC AFL-CIO reported $1.07 million in revenue, $856,321 in expenses and over $1.6 million in net assets. More than 90 percent of MDDC AFL-CIO’s revenue came from its programs and services, with just $72,950 coming from fundraising activities. [41] [42]

Donna Edwards is the president of MDDC AFL-CIO. Edwards previously worked as the secretary-treasurer of the statewide Maryland AFL-CIO from 2001 until 2016, a role in which she worked to expand the state union’s legislative advocacy work. Edwards has also been president of the American Federation of State, County, and Municipal Employees (AFSCME) Council 112 since 1984. In addition to her work with local unions, Edwards is president of the AFL-CIO Northeast Council and vice president of the Metropolitan Baltimore Council of AFL-CIO Unions. [43] [44]

Since 2013, Edwards has donated over $5,400 to left-of-center candidates and committees. Nearly all of her donations have gone to AFSCME People, a PAC affiliated with AFSCME, though she has also made contributions to Rep. John Sarbanes (D-MD) and ActBlue. [45]

Other current and former MDDC AFL-CIO executives include Ricarra Jones, political director of 1199SEIU; Fred Mason, a self-described “friend” of the Communist Party USA; and Jay Hutchins, vice president of public affairs for Planned Parenthood. [46] [47] [48]

References

  1. “Cumberland Native Elected as Regional AFL-CIO President.” Cumberland Times-News. November 27, 2017. Accessed September 11, 2021. https://www.times-news.com/news/local_news/cumberland-native-elected-as-regional-afl-cio-president/article_e08bb083-43cb-5e43-8017-6ec195342e1f.html. ^
  2. “2018 Legislative Synopsis.” Maryland State and District of Columbia AFL-CIO. March 6, 2019. Accessed September 11, 2021. https://www.mddclabor.org/2018-legislative-synopsis. ^
  3. Lazarick, Len. “Maryland Voters Support Raising the Minimum Wage to $15.” MarylandReporter.com. January 12, 2019. Accessed September 11, 2021. https://marylandreporter.com/2019/01/10/maryland-voters-support-raising-the-minimum-wage-to-15/. ^
  4. “2018 Legislative Synopsis.” Maryland State and District of Columbia AFL-CIO. March 6, 2019. Accessed September 11, 2021. https://www.mddclabor.org/2018-legislative-synopsis. ^
  5. Knezevich, Alison. “Groups Push Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan to Issue COVID-19 Workplace Safety Rules.” Baltimore Sun. August 26, 2020. Accessed September 11, 2021. https://www.baltimoresun.com/politics/bs-md-worker-safety-petition-20200826-6hv7jx5icjclphsc7uydeyd5sa-story.html. ^
  6. “Endorsed Candidates.” Maryland State and District of Columbia AFL-CIO. September 2, 2020. Accessed September 11, 2021. https://www.mddclabor.org/labor-2020/endorsed-candidates. ^
  7. “Record.” Jamie Raskin for Congress. Accessed September 11, 2021. https://jamieraskin.com/record. ^
  8. “Home.” Mfume for Congress. May 18, 2021. Accessed September 11, 2021. https://mfumeforcongress.com/. ^
  9. “2019 Report Cards All Representatives / Ideology Score.” GovTrack.us. Accessed September 11, 2021. https://www.govtrack.us/congress/members/report-cards/2019/house/ideology. ^
  10. “Donna S. Edwards.” Maryland State and District of Columbia AFL-CIO. October 2, 2018. Accessed September 11, 2021. https://www.mddclabor.org/about-us/donna-s-edwards-0. ^
  11. “Cumberland Native Elected as Regional AFL-CIO President.” Cumberland Times-News. November 27, 2017. Accessed September 11, 2021. https://www.times-news.com/news/local_news/cumberland-native-elected-as-regional-afl-cio-president/article_e08bb083-43cb-5e43-8017-6ec195342e1f.html. ^
  12. Baltimore Fishbowl Staff. “Brandon Scott Names Local Leaders to Head His Transition Team.” Baltimore Fishbowl. October 20, 2020. Accessed September 11, 2021.  https://baltimorefishbowl.com/stories/mayoral-candidate-brandon-scott-names-civic-business-and-community-leaders-to-transition-team/. ^
  13. Wheeler, Tim. “Baltimore Crowd Celebrates 100 Years of the Communist Party USA.” People’s World. September 17, 2019. Accessed September 11, 2021. https://www.peoplesworld.org/article/baltimore-crowd-celebrates-100-years-of-the-communist-party-usa/. ^
  14. Daily Record Staff. “Jay Hutchins: Planned Parenthood.” Maryland Daily Record. October 18, 2019. Accessed September 11, 2021. https://thedailyrecord.com/2019/10/18/jay-hutchins-planned-parenthood/. ^
  15. “Cumberland Native Elected as Regional AFL-CIO President.” Cumberland Times-News, November 27, 2017. Accessed September 11, 2021. https://www.times-news.com/news/local_news/cumberland-native-elected-as-regional-afl-cio-president/article_e08bb083-43cb-5e43-8017-6ec195342e1f.html. ^
  16. “Cumberland Native Elected as Regional AFL-CIO President.” Cumberland Times-News, November 27, 2017. Accessed September 11, 2021. https://www.times-news.com/news/local_news/cumberland-native-elected-as-regional-afl-cio-president/article_e08bb083-43cb-5e43-8017-6ec195342e1f.html. ^
  17. “2018 Legislative Synopsis.” Maryland State and District of Columbia AFL-CIO. March 6, 2019. Accessed September 11, 2021. https://www.mddclabor.org/2018-legislative-synopsis. ^
  18. “2018 Legislative Synopsis.” Maryland State and District of Columbia AFL-CIO. March 6, 2019. Accessed September 11, 2021. https://www.mddclabor.org/2018-legislative-synopsis. ^
  19. 2018 Legislative Synopsis.” Maryland State and District of Columbia AFL-CIO. March 6, 2019. Accessed September 11, 2021. https://www.mddclabor.org/2018-legislative-synopsis. ^
  20. Lazarick, Len. “Maryland Voters Support Raising the Minimum Wage to $15.” MarylandReporter.com. January 12, 2019. Accessed September 11, 2021. https://marylandreporter.com/2019/01/10/maryland-voters-support-raising-the-minimum-wage-to-15/. ^
  21. “2018 Legislative Synopsis.” Maryland State and District of Columbia AFL-CIO. March 6, 2019. Accessed September 11, 2021. https://www.mddclabor.org/2018-legislative-synopsis. ^
  22. Knezevich, Alison. “Groups Push Maryland Gov. Larry Hogan to Issue COVID-19 Workplace Safety Rules.” Baltimore Sun. August 26, 2020. Accessed September 11, 2021. https://www.baltimoresun.com/politics/bs-md-worker-safety-petition-20200826-6hv7jx5icjclphsc7uydeyd5sa-story.html. ^
  23. Shwe, Elizabeth. “Lawmakers Press State Officials on Unemployment Benefits as Expanded Federal Payments End.” Maryland Matters. June 24, 2021. Accessed September 11, 2021.  https://www.marylandmatters.org/2021/06/23/lawmakers-press-state-officials-on-unemployment-benefits-as-expanded-federal-payments-end/. ^
  24. Sofastaii, Mallory. “‘Nothing Seems to Be Working Here’ MD Lawmakers Press Labor Secretary on Unemployment Issues.” WMAR. August 16, 2021. Accessed September 11, 2021. https://www.wmar2news.com/unemploymentguide/nothing-seems-to-be-working-here-md-lawmakers-press-labor-secretary-on-unemployment-issues. ^
  25. Take Action.” Maryland State and District of Columbia AFL-CIO. September 16, 2016. Accessed September 11, 2021. https://www.mddclabor.org/take-action. ^
  26. “Add Your Name to Support Working Families.” AFL-CIO. Accessed September 11, 2021. https://actionnetwork.org/forms/american-families-plan/?source=unionhall. ^
  27. “Call Now: Tell Your U.S. Senators to Support the Dream Act (S. 264) and the SECURE Act (S. 306).” AFL-CIO. Accessed September 11, 2021. https://actionnetwork.org/forms/supporthr6?source=unionhall. ^
  28. Barrickman, Nick, and Leon Gutierrez. “Washington D.C. Metro Dispatchers Launch One-Day Strike over Meager Pay During Covid-19.” World Socialist Web Site. May 17, 2021. Accessed September 11, 2021. https://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2021/05/18/metr-m18.html. ^
  29. Gruenberg, Mark. “Jobless Workers Fight Back against Republican Governors’ Unemployment Cutoffs.” People’s World. July 8, 2021. Accessed September 11, 2021.  https://www.peoplesworld.org/article/jobless-workers-fight-back-against-republican-governors-unemployment-cutoffs/. ^
  30. Gruenberg, Mark. “Jobless Workers Fight Back against Republican Governors’ Unemployment Cutoffs.” People’s World. July 8, 2021. Accessed September 11, 2021. https://www.peoplesworld.org/article/jobless-workers-fight-back-against-republican-governors-unemployment-cutoffs/. ^
  31. Schepers, Emile. “Labor Movement Begins to Reassess Its Approach to Cuba Relations.” People’s World. October 3, 2017. Accessed September 11, 2021. https://www.peoplesworld.org/article/labor-movement-begins-to-reassess-its-approach-to-cuba-relations/. ^
  32.  Schepers, Emile. “Labor Movement Begins to Reassess Its Approach to Cuba Relations.” People’s World. October 3, 2017. Accessed September 11, 2021. https://www.peoplesworld.org/article/labor-movement-begins-to-reassess-its-approach-to-cuba-relations/. ^
  33. “Endorsed Candidates.” Maryland State and District of Columbia AFL-CIO. September 2, 2020. Accessed September 11, 2021. https://www.mddclabor.org/labor-2020/endorsed-candidates. ^
  34. “Record.” Jamie Raskin for Congress. Accessed September 11, 2021. https://jamieraskin.com/record. ^
  35. “Home.” Mfume for Congress. May 18, 2021. Accessed September 11, 2021. https://mfumeforcongress.com/. ^
  36. “2019 Report Cards All Representatives / Ideology Score.” GovTrack.us. Accessed September 11, 2021. https://www.govtrack.us/congress/members/report-cards/2019/house/ideology. ^
  37. Round, Ian. “Four Political Newcomers Seek West Baltimore Council Seat.” Baltimore Brew. May 22, 2020. Accessed September 11, 2021. https://baltimorebrew.com/2020/05/22/four-political-newcomers-seek-west-baltimore-council-seat/. ^
  38. “Issues.” James Torrence for City Council, District 7. Accessed September 11, 2021. https://www.jamestorrence.com/issues. ^
  39. “Power the Polls.” Workers First Vote Union. Maryland State and DC AFL-CIO. September 10, 2020. Accessed September 11, 2021. https://www.workersfirstvoteunion.org/power-polls. ^
  40. “How to Vote In Maryland.” Maryland State and District of Columbia AFL-CIO. September 16, 2020. Accessed September 11, 2021. https://www.mddclabor.org/labor-2020/how-vote-maryland. ^
  41. “Maryland State and DC AFL-CIO.” Return of Organization Exempt from Income Tax (Form 990), 2018. Part I. ^
  42. “Maryland State and DC AFL-CIO.” Return of Organization Exempt from Income Tax (Form 990), 2018. Part VIII, Line 1c. ^
  43. “Donna S. Edwards.” Maryland State and District of Columbia AFL-CIO. October 2, 2018. Accessed September 11, 2021. https://www.mddclabor.org/about-us/donna-s-edwards-0. ^
  44. “Cumberland Native Elected as Regional AFL-CIO President.” Cumberland Times-News. November 27, 2017. Accessed September 11, 2021. https://www.times-news.com/news/local_news/cumberland-native-elected-as-regional-afl-cio-president/article_e08bb083-43cb-5e43-8017-6ec195342e1f.html. ^
  45. “Browse Individual Contributions: Donna Edwards.” Federal Election Commission. Accessed September 11, 2021. https://www.fec.gov/data/receipts/individual-contributions/?contributor_name=Donna%2BEdwards&contributor_city=Baltimore&two_year_transaction_period=2022&min_date=01%2F01%2F2000&max_date=12%2F31%2F2022. ^
  46. Baltimore Fishbowl Staff. “Brandon Scott Names Local Leaders to Head His Transition Team.” Baltimore Fishbowl. October 20, 2020. Accessed September 11, 2021. https://baltimorefishbowl.com/stories/mayoral-candidate-brandon-scott-names-civic-business-and-community-leaders-to-transition-team/. ^
  47. Wheeler, Tim. “Baltimore Crowd Celebrates 100 Years of the Communist Party USA.” People’s World. September 17, 2019. Accessed September 11, 2021. https://www.peoplesworld.org/article/baltimore-crowd-celebrates-100-years-of-the-communist-party-usa/. ^
  48. Daily Record Staff. “Jay Hutchins: Planned Parenthood.” Maryland Daily Record. October 18, 2019. Accessed September 11, 2021. https://thedailyrecord.com/2019/10/18/jay-hutchins-planned-parenthood/. ^

Directors, Employees & Supporters

  See an error? Let us know!

Nonprofit Information

  • Accounting Period: December - November
  • Tax Exemption Received: May 1, 1956

  • Available Filings

    Period Form Type Total revenue Total functional expenses Total assets (EOY) Total liabilities (EOY) Unrelated business income? Total contributions Program service revenue Investment income Comp. of current officers, directors, etc. Form 990
    2019 Dec Form 990 $1,120,684 $885,333 $2,102,247 $243,079 Y $61,680 $1,066,358 $2,102 $181,260
    2018 Dec Form 990 $1,072,226 $856,321 $1,909,660 $285,843 Y $78,150 $1,000,090 $1,393 $180,577 PDF
    2017 Dec Form 990 $1,184,604 $1,106,984 $1,747,532 $339,620 N $64,450 $1,141,187 $643 $341,989 PDF
    2016 Dec Form 990 $1,015,430 $1,164,670 $1,607,951 $277,659 N $750 $972,962 $160 $356,008 PDF
    2015 Dec Form 990 $553,573 $568,340 $1,794,179 $314,647 N $0 $540,490 $33 $0 PDF
    2015 Jun Form 990 $1,060,611 $1,117,606 $1,826,242 $331,943 N $50,000 $1,014,881 $197 $336,845 PDF
    2014 Jun Form 990 $1,097,999 $1,013,622 $1,916,932 $365,638 N $0 $1,058,514 $168 $0 PDF
    2013 Jun Form 990 $1,041,802 $964,157 $1,868,579 $401,662 N $0 $991,014 $263 $0 PDF
    2012 Jun Form 990 $1,099,281 $976,815 $1,827,474 $451,375 N $2,000 $1,043,219 $415 $330,632 PDF
    2011 Jun Form 990 $987,729 $987,405 $1,745,488 $491,855 N $0 $927,820 $607 $329,735 PDF

    Additional Filings (PDFs)

    Maryland State and D.C. AFL-CIO


    Annapolis, MD