Non-profit

Alliance for Gun Responsibility Foundation

Location:

SEATTLE, WA

Tax ID:

46-4601368

Tax-Exempt Status:

501(c)(3)

Budget (2016):

Revenue: $398,544
Expenses: $393,026
Assets: $160,191

The Alliance for Gun Responsibility Foundation is the charitable arm of the Alliance for Gun Responsibility, a left-of-center political advocacy organization focused on promoting gun control the Washington State. The Foundation organizes summits around gun control, engages in public education campaigns to support left-of-center gun control initiatives, and organizes a volunteer program to promote activism. [1]

Organization Activity

Most of the Foundation’s work is concentrated around public education and research campaigns that encourage the development and implementation of left-of-center gun control measures.

Summits and Other Education Programs

The Foundation’s main hub for information sharing and coordination with other organizations is its twice-yearly summits. [2] The summits are centered around gun control as it relates to a range of other issues, including domestic violence, mental health, and suicide prevention. [3] The Foundation hosts summits in Seattle that bring together community leaders and gun control advocates to promote a left-of-center public policy agenda. [4]

The Foundation’s most recent summit, hosted in November of 2019, focused on hate crimes and gun violence. [5] The event was put on in coordination with the left-of-center Anti-Defamation League (ADL) and featured speakers including the ADL’s Joanna Mendelson, who claimed at the event that “the vast majority of domestic terrorism murders” have been committed by “right-wing extremists” with guns. [6] Panelists also included an array of left-of-center community leaders, including Washington state Representative Javier Valdez (D-Seattle), Erin Goodman of the Seattle Community Police Commission, and former Seattle Municipal Judge Anne Levinson. [7]

The Foundation runs additional “educational programs” that encourage enhanced community action on gun control. In 2016, the Alliance for Gun Responsibility supported Washington Initiative 1491. [8] The initiative sought to allow judges in Washington to bar individuals deemed a “danger” to themselves or others from owning firearms, solely at the request of law enforcement or family members. [9] Despite the fact that such measures have been criticized for posing violations to due process, the Alliance for Gun Responsibility Foundation has encouraged civilians to take advantage of the program, starting a website called GunProtectionOrder.org to help individuals file and respond to such orders. [10] [11] The Foundation has also published the Extreme Risk Protection Order Toolkit on order to encourage other states to pass similar regulations. [12]

Volunteer Programs

The Alliance for Gun Responsibility Foundation runs a volunteer program throughout the state of Washington, mostly in and around the Seattle area and on university campuses. [13] The Foundation includes eight active chapters around the state of Washington, three active campus chapters, and three county chapters in development. [14] Chapters carry out organizing in support of gun control measures, including tabling at community events, canvassing in favor of gun-control initiatives, meeting with elected officials, phone banking, and organizing letter-writing campaigns to support gun control. [15]

The Foundation also runs community outreach programs, including a program that advocates for increased funding and legislation on gun control specifically in African-American communities. [16] The Foundation also runs its Education to Action (Ed2Ac) program, which runs workshops to train and develop young people into left-of-center gun control activists. [17] In 2018, the Foundation sent students to Washington, D.C. to write the Student Bill of Rights on school safety, a document advocating for strict gun control measures. [18]

Research and Policy Implementation

The Alliance for Gun Responsibility Foundation has argued that “gun violence is a public health crisis,” and claims to support research into the public health impact of gun violence. [19] The Foundation’s research purports to connect individuals who report firearm injuries to having an increased likelihood of firearm deaths and arrests in the future. [20] The Foundation has also supported using funding for public health research on gun violence to instead research the impact of gun control laws in order to argue in favor of their effectiveness, claiming that “more guns equals more gun violence.” [21] [22]

The Foundation then uses this research to encourage the implementation of left-of-center gun control laws. Most notably, the Alliance for Gun Responsibility Foundation joined with King County to assist in implementing the Regional Domestic Violence Firearms Enforcement Unit (RDVFEU), a unit that works for the “proactive enforcement” of gun control regulations. [23] The Foundation proudly broadcasts that it has helped RDVFEU increase firearm surrenders by 400% since it was founded. [24] In further collaboration with RDVFEU and the Washington state law enforcement commission, the Foundation has worked to develop and implement curriculum for police officers on handling and encouraging firearm surrender. [25]

Partnerships

The Alliance for Gun Responsibility Foundation has partnered with dozens of local and national left-of-center gun control organizations, including Moms Demand Action for Gun Sense, March for Our Lives, and Everytown for Gun Safety. The Alliance has also partnered with left-of-center organizations unrelated to gun control initiatives, including Planned Parenthood, the American Federation of Teachers (AFT), and the Faith Action Network. [26]

Leadership

The Alliance for Gun Responsibility Foundation shares a staff with its sister political advocacy organization, the Alliance for Gun Responsibility, including CEO Renee Hopkins who previously worked as executive director of the Seattle Police Foundation (SPF). [27]

The Foundation’s board includes several notable left-of-center activists, including Sue Cary, founding member of Grandmothers Against Violence and longtime public housing developer; Linda Parrish, a labor attorney; and Zach Silk, president of left-of-center public policy organization Civic Ventures. [28]

References

  1. “The Foundation.” Alliance for Gun Responsibility Foundation. Accessed June 11, 2020. https://foundation.gunresponsibility.org/the-foundation/ ^
  2. “Summits.” Alliance for Gun Responsibility Foundation. Accessed June 11, 2020. https://foundation.gunresponsibility.org/solutions/ ^
  3. “Summits.” Alliance for Gun Responsibility Foundation. Accessed June 11, 2020. https://foundation.gunresponsibility.org/solutions/ ^
  4. “Summits.” Alliance for Gun Responsibility Foundation. Accessed June 11, 2020. https://foundation.gunresponsibility.org/solutions/ ^
  5. “Hate & Gun Violence: November 12, 2019.” Alliance for Gun Responsibility Foundation. Accessed October 22, 2020. https://foundation.gunresponsibility.org/solution/hate-gun-violence-november-12-2019/. ^
  6. “Hate & Gun Violence: November 12, 2019.” Alliance for Gun Responsibility Foundation. Accessed October 22, 2020. https://foundation.gunresponsibility.org/solution/hate-gun-violence-november-12-2019/. ^
  7. “Hate & Gun Violence: November 12, 2019.” Alliance for Gun Responsibility Foundation. Accessed October 22, 2020. https://foundation.gunresponsibility.org/solution/hate-gun-violence-november-12-2019/. ^
  8. “I-1491.” Alliance for Gun Responsibility. Accessed October 22, 2020. https://gunresponsibility.org/1491-2/. ^
  9. “I-1491.” Alliance for Gun Responsibility. Accessed October 22, 2020. https://gunresponsibility.org/1491-2/. ^
  10. Vasilogambros, Matt. “Red Flag Laws Spur Debate Over Due Process.” The Pew Charitable Trusts, September 4, 2019. https://www.pewtrusts.org/en/research-and-analysis/blogs/stateline/2019/09/04/red-flag-laws-spur-debate-over-due-process. ^
  11. “Public Education.” Alliance for Gun Responsibility Foundation. Accessed October 22, 2020. https://foundation.gunresponsibility.org/public-education-2/. ^
  12. “Public Education.” Alliance for Gun Responsibility Foundation. Accessed October 22, 2020. https://foundation.gunresponsibility.org/public-education-2/. ^
  13. “Chapter Teams.” Alliance for Gun Responsibility Foundation. Accessed June 11, 2020. https://foundation.gunresponsibility.org/chapter-teams/ ^
  14. “Chapter Teams.” Alliance for Gun Responsibility Foundation. Accessed June 11, 2020. https://foundation.gunresponsibility.org/chapter-teams/ ^
  15. “Chapter Teams.” Alliance for Gun Responsibility Foundation. Accessed June 11, 2020. https://foundation.gunresponsibility.org/chapter-teams/ ^
  16. “Programs and Youth Engagement.” Alliance for Gun Responsibility Foundation. Accessed October 22, 2020. https://foundation.gunresponsibility.org/programs-and-youth-engagement/. ^
  17. “Programs and Youth Engagement.” Alliance for Gun Responsibility Foundation. Accessed October 22, 2020. https://foundation.gunresponsibility.org/programs-and-youth-engagement/. ^
  18. “Programs and Youth Engagement.” Alliance for Gun Responsibility Foundation. Accessed October 22, 2020. https://foundation.gunresponsibility.org/programs-and-youth-engagement/. ^
  19. “Research.” Alliance for Gun Responsibility Foundation. Accessed October 22, 2020. https://foundation.gunresponsibility.org/research/. ^
  20. “Research.” Alliance for Gun Responsibility Foundation. Accessed October 22, 2020. https://foundation.gunresponsibility.org/research/. ^
  21. “Research.” Alliance for Gun Responsibility Foundation. Accessed October 22, 2020. https://foundation.gunresponsibility.org/research/. ^
  22. “Gun Violence in America.” Alliance for Gun Responsibility Foundation. Accessed October 22, 2020. https://foundation.gunresponsibility.org/gun-violence-in-america/. ^
  23. “Research.” Alliance for Gun Responsibility Foundation. Accessed October 22, 2020. https://foundation.gunresponsibility.org/research/. ^
  24. “Research.” Alliance for Gun Responsibility Foundation. Accessed October 22, 2020. https://foundation.gunresponsibility.org/research/. ^
  25. “Research.” Alliance for Gun Responsibility Foundation. Accessed October 22, 2020. https://foundation.gunresponsibility.org/research/. ^
  26. “Partners.” Alliance for Gun Responsibility. Accessed June 7, 2020.

    https://gunresponsibility.org/partners/ ^

  27. “Board of Directors.” Alliance for Gun Responsibility Foundation. Accessed October 22, 2020. https://foundation.gunresponsibility.org/board-of-directors/. ^
  28. “Board of Directors.” Alliance for Gun Responsibility Foundation. Accessed October 22, 2020. https://foundation.gunresponsibility.org/board-of-directors/. ^
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Nonprofit Information

  • Accounting Period: December - November
  • Tax Exemption Received: August 1, 2014

  • Available Filings

    Period Form Type Total revenue Total functional expenses Total assets (EOY) Total liabilities (EOY) Unrelated business income? Total contributions Program service revenue Investment income Comp. of current officers, directors, etc. Form 990
    2016 Dec Form 990 $398,544 $393,026 $160,191 $0 N $398,544 $0 $0 $63,923
    2015 Dec Form 990 $509,505 $370,834 $186,004 $31,831 N $509,502 $0 $3 $0 PDF
    2014 Dec Form 990 $1,280,551 $1,265,048 $15,503 $0 N $1,280,551 $0 $0 $0 PDF

    Alliance for Gun Responsibility Foundation

    PO BOX 21712
    SEATTLE, WA 98111-3712