Non-profit

100 Black Men of America

Website:

100blackmen.org/

Location:

Atlanta, GA

Tax ID:

58-1974429

Tax-Exempt Status:

501(c)(3)

Budget (2017):

Revenue: $5,359,536
Expenses: $3,866,490
Assets: $5,151,320

Formation:

1992

CEO:

John E. Armstrong, Jr.

Type:

Non-profit

Former CEO:

Brian Pauling

Former CEO's Salary:

$174,905

100 Black Men of America, Inc., often shortened to The 100, is a mentoring organization created by African-American men to support African-American children and teens. The program recruits and trains black professionals to mentor youth in the areas of education, health and wellness, leadership, and economic empowerment, among others, as a means to improve quality of life. The 100 now has more than 100 local chapters nationwide[1] and offers mentorship beyond high school with its Collegiate 100[2] and Emerging 100 programs, offering support in college and through age 35. [3]

Originally conceived in 1963, 100 Black Men of America was established as a national organization in 1986. Its founders included prominent African American business and industry figures like former New York mayor David Dinkins (D), former executive director of the New York Urban League, Livingston Wingate, former associate press secretary to then President John F. Kennedy, Andrew Hatcher, and prominent civil rights activist, Jackie Robinson, among several others. [4]

Though unaffiliated with the Black Lives Matter organization, some of The 100’s chapters have been known to march with them, notably in the demonstrations in Ferguson, Missouri, following the controversial fatal police shooting of African-American teenager Michael Brown. In May 2020, 100 Black Men of America’s board chair Thomas Dortch, Jr. wrote to Attorney General William Barr, urging the Department of Justice to investigate the potential police misconduct in the deaths of George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery, and Breonna Taylor. [5]

The 100 uses its mentorship program as its primary way to advocate for black youth,[6] with some chapters calling for roundtable discussions with local politicians, civic leaders, churches, law enforcement, and concerned citizens to discuss policy changes, especially as it regards perceived aggression and racism among police. [7]

The majority of The 100’s funding comes from corporations and private foundations, totaling nearly $3 million in 2019. [8] Notable program sponsorship comes from Coca-Cola,[9] UPS,[10] Wells Fargo, Ally Financial, and State Farm. [11]

History

The 100 was created in New York City in 1963 with the intention of improving conditions in the African-American community. The group was founded by prominent business and industry men like future New York Mayor David Dinkins (D) former executive director of the New York Urban League Livingston Wingate, former associate press secretary to then President John F. Kennedy Andrew Hatcher, and Baseball Hall of Famer and prominent civil rights activist Jackie Robinson, among several others. [12]

A national organization was established in 1986, calling itself 100 Black Men of America, Inc., with four elected founding board officers. In 1987, the organization held its first national conference in Atlanta, featuring speakers like Alex Haley, author of Roots, and Maynard Jackson (D), the former mayor of Atlanta. [13]

The 100 has more than 100 local chapters nationwide. [14] In addition, The 100 has a Collegiate 100 and Emerging 100 program, designed to work in conjunction with local chapters to continue mentorship through college and beyond until age 35, respectively. [15] The Emerging 100 program is considered by The 100 to be the “official young professional auxiliary” component of its organization. [16]

Activity

While 100 Black Men of America claims no formal relationship with Black Lives Matter, some of its chapters have been known to march with them, notably in the demonstrations in Ferguson, Missouri, following the fatal police shooting of African-American teenager Michael Brown. Unlike Black Lives Matter, which uses social media and protest to further its cause, The 100 uses its mentorship program as its primary way to advocate for black youth,[17] with some chapters calling for roundtable discussions with local politicians, civic leaders, churches, law enforcement, and concerned citizens to discuss policy changes, especially as it regards perceived aggression and racism among police. [18]

In May 2020, 100 Black Men of America’s board chair Thomas Dortch, Jr., wrote to Attorney General William Barr urging the Department of Justice to investigate potential police misconduct in the deaths of George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery, and Breonna Taylor. [19]

Funding

100 Black Men of America receives its primary funding from corporations and foundations, with a small percentage coming from individual donors and government grants. Nearly $3 million came from corporations and foundations in 2019 for specific program areas. [20]

Coca-Cola is the sponsor of the Mentoring the 100 Way Across A Lifetime program,[21] UPS is the main sponsor of the National Scholarship program,[22] and programs that support economic empowerment are sponsored by Wells Fargo, Ally Financial, and State Farm. [23]

Foundation grants include a combined $200,000 from the Georgia Power Foundation in 2015 and 2016,[24] $200,000 from the Lilly Endowment in 2018,[25] and smaller grants from groups like the Chick-fil-A Foundation ($25,000),[26] EdChoice ($29,500),[27] and the Primerica African American Leadership Council ($10,000). [28]

Board of Directors

Chair of the board Thomas Dortch, Jr. is the former associate director of the Georgia Democratic Party and a former state director and chief administrator for former U.S. Senator Sam Nunn (D-GA). Dortch established the National Black College Alumni Hall of Fame Foundation and co-founded the Georgia Association of Minority Entrepreneurs (GAME). Dortch has previously been involved with organizations like the National Drug Free Communities Act Advisory Commission, the Black-Jewish Coalition, and Assault on Illiteracy, and currently serves on the board of the Atlanta Business League. [29]

Vice chair Albert Dotson, Jr. was appointed to the Federal Judicial Nominating Commission by then-U.S. Senators Bill Nelson (D-FL) and Marco Rubio (R-FL). Dotson was appointed by former president Barack Obama to be commissioner of the White House Commission on Educational Excellence for African Americans, where he served from 2014 to 2018. Dotson currently serves on the boards of Leadership Florida, the Florida Council of 100, and the Mourning Family Foundation, among others. [30]

Board treasurer Milton Jones, Jr. serves on the board of the Atlanta Business League and as the director and chair of the Budget and Finance Committee of the United Negro College Fund. Jones formerly served as chair of the board of 100 Black Men of Atlanta. [31]

Board secretary Mark Alexander is an advocate for health equity, the executive director of Youth Movement and the founder and former chair of the board of the Community School in Oakland, California . Alexander serves on the board of the San Francisco Bay Area Chapter of 100 Black Men, where he formerly served three terms as chair. [32]

Members of the board at large include Acey Byrd, Bethew “Bert” Jennings, Michael Victorian, Charles Walker, and Jewett Walker, Jr. [33]

References

  1. “Find a Chapter.” 100 Black Men of America, Inc., 2020. Accessed August 3, 2020.  https://100blackmen.org/find-a-chapter/. ^
  2. “Collegiate 100.” 100 Black Men of America, Inc., 2020. Accessed August 3, 2020. https://100blackmen.org/collegiate-100/. ^
  3. “Emerging 100.” 100 Black Men of America, Inc., 2020. Accessed August 3, 2020. https://100blackmen.org/emerging-100/. ^
  4. “Our History.” 100 Black Men of America, Inc., 2020. Accessed August 2, 2020. https://100blackmen.org/our-history/. ^
  5. “News Release from the Chairman of 100 Black Men of America, Inc. on the Murders of George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery, and Breonna Taylor.” 100 Black Men of Greater Detroit, May 28, 2020. Accessed August 3, 2020. https://www.100blackmendetroit.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/100-BMOA-Statement-on-Murder-of-George-Floyd.pdf. ^
  6. “Where Social Change Happens One Life at a Time.” The Atlantic. Accessed August 3, 2020. https://www.theatlantic.com/sponsored/allstate/where-social-change-happens-one-life-at-a-time/583/. ^
  7. Jenkins, Doug. “100 Black Men Organization: ‘Enough is Enough.’” Alton Daily News, June 27, 2020. Accessed August 3, 2020. http://altondailynews.com/news/details.cfm?id=306368. ^
  8. “2019 Annual Report.” 100 Black Men of America, Inc. Accessed August 2, 2020. https://100blackmen.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/2019-Annual-Report_opt.pdf. ^
  9. “Mentoring the 100 Way Across A Lifetime.” 100 Black Men of America, Inc., 2020. Accessed August 3, 2020. https://100blackmen.org/four-for-the-future/mentoring/mentoring-the-100-way/. ^
  10. “National Scholarship Program.” 100 Black Men of America, Inc., 2020. Accessed August 3, 2020. https://100blackmen.org/four-for-the-future/education/national-scholarship-program/. ^
  11. “Economic Empowerment.” 100 Black Men of America, Inc., 2020. Accessed August 3, 2020. https://100blackmen.org/four-for-the-future/economic-empowerment/. ^
  12. “Our History.” 100 Black Men of America, Inc., 2020. Accessed August 2, 2020. https://100blackmen.org/our-history/. ^
  13. “Our History.” 100 Black Men of America, Inc., 2020. Accessed August 2, 2020. https://100blackmen.org/our-history/. ^
  14. “Find a Chapter.” 100 Black Men of America, Inc., 2020. Accessed August 3, 2020.  https://100blackmen.org/find-a-chapter/. ^
  15. “Collegiate 100.” 100 Black Men of America, Inc., 2020. Accessed August 3, 2020. https://100blackmen.org/collegiate-100/. ^
  16. “Emerging 100.” 100 Black Men of America, Inc., 2020. Accessed August 3, 2020. https://100blackmen.org/emerging-100/. ^
  17. “Where Social Change Happens One Life at a Time.” The Atlantic. Accessed August 3, 2020. https://www.theatlantic.com/sponsored/allstate/where-social-change-happens-one-life-at-a-time/583/. ^
  18. Jenkins, Doug. “100 Black Men Organization: ‘Enough is Enough.’” Alton Daily News, June 27, 2020. Accessed August 3, 2020. http://altondailynews.com/news/details.cfm?id=306368. ^
  19. “News Release from the Chairman of 100 Black Men of America, Inc. on the Murders of George Floyd, Ahmaud Arbery, and Breonna Taylor.” 100 Black Men of Greater Detroit, May 28, 2020. Accessed August 3, 2020. https://www.100blackmendetroit.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/100-BMOA-Statement-on-Murder-of-George-Floyd.pdf. ^
  20. “2019 Annual Report.” 100 Black Men of America, Inc. Accessed August 2, 2020. https://100blackmen.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/07/2019-Annual-Report_opt.pdf. ^
  21. “Mentoring the 100 Way Across A Lifetime.” 100 Black Men of America, Inc., 2020. Accessed August 3, 2020. https://100blackmen.org/four-for-the-future/mentoring/mentoring-the-100-way/. ^
  22. “National Scholarship Program.” 100 Black Men of America, Inc., 2020. Accessed August 3, 2020. https://100blackmen.org/four-for-the-future/education/national-scholarship-program/. ^
  23. “Economic Empowerment.” 100 Black Men of America, Inc., 2020. Accessed August 3, 2020. https://100blackmen.org/four-for-the-future/economic-empowerment/. ^
  24. Georgia Power Foundation, Inc, Return of Private Foundation (Form 990-PF), 2015 and 2016, Part XV, Line 3a. ^
  25. Lilly Endowment, Inc, Return of Private Foundation (Form 990-PF), 2018, Part XV, Line 3a. ^
  26. Chic-fil-A Foundation, Inc, Return of Private Foundation (Form 990-PF), 2017, Part XV, Line 3a. ^
  27. EdChoice, Inc, Return of Organization Exempt From Income Tax (Form 990), 2017, Schedule I, Part II. ^
  28. The Primerica Foundation, Inc, Return of Private Foundation (Form 990-PF), 2017, Part XV, Line 3a. ^
  29. “Thomas W. Dortch, Jr.” Atlanta Business League, 2015. Accessed August 2, 2020. https://www.atlantabusinessleague.org/who-we-are/executive-leadership/board-officers/12-who-we-are/biographies/44-thomas-w-dortch-jr. ^
  30. “Albert E. Dotson, Jr.” LinkedIn, 2020. Accessed August 2, 2020. https://www.linkedin.com/in/aldotson/. ^
  31. “Milton H. Jones, Jr.” LinkedIn, 2020. Accessed August 2, 2020. https://www.linkedin.com/in/milton-h-jones-jr-5229a338/. ^
  32. “Mark Alexander.” LinkedIn, 2020. Accessed August 2, 2020. https://www.linkedin.com/in/mark-alexander-4873548/. ^
  33. “Board of Directors.” 100 Black Men of America, Inc., 2020. Accessed August 3, 2020. https://100blackmen.org/board-of-directors/. ^

Donor Organizations

  1. EdChoice (Non-profit)
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Nonprofit Information

  • Accounting Period: June - May
  • Tax Exemption Received: July 1, 1992

  • Available Filings

    Period Form Type Total revenue Total functional expenses Total assets (EOY) Total liabilities (EOY) Unrelated business income? Total contributions Program service revenue Investment income Comp. of current officers, directors, etc. Form 990
    2017 Jun Form 990 $5,359,536 $3,866,490 $5,151,320 $981,355 N $4,999,890 $296,178 $11,131 $312,824 PDF
    2016 Jun Form 990 $4,385,459 $4,459,576 $4,094,542 $1,417,623 N $4,048,627 $328,959 $156 $444,204
    2015 Jun Form 990 $4,412,184 $3,820,204 $4,056,251 $1,305,215 N $4,150,870 $258,230 $20 $423,170 PDF
    2014 Jun Form 990 $5,553,821 $3,932,344 $3,120,180 $961,124 N $5,304,241 $249,367 $213 $595,976 PDF
    2013 Jun Form 990 $3,925,557 $4,394,656 $1,737,046 $1,199,467 N $3,640,540 $284,826 $191 $266,943 PDF
    2012 Jun Form 990 $4,373,900 $4,139,702 $2,220,032 $1,213,354 N $3,971,763 $43,910 $637 $254,472 PDF
    2011 Jun Form 990 $3,911,950 $4,203,538 $2,138,173 $1,365,693 N $3,540,832 $10,177 $1,085 $244,376 PDF

    Additional Filings (PDFs)

    100 Black Men of America

    141 AUBURN AVE NE
    Atlanta, GA 30303-2503