Government Agency

Biden Administration

Years:

2021-Present

Preceded By:

Trump Administration

The administration of President Joe Biden, a Democrat, began on January 20, 2021. It succeeded the Trump administration after Biden defeated Republican President Donald Trump in the 2020 Presidential Election.

President and Vice President

Joe Biden is the President of the United States.

Kamala Harris is the Vice President of the United States.

Jill Biden is the First Lady of the United States.

Douglas Emhoff is the Second Gentleman of the United States.

Department of Agriculture

Tom Vilsack is Secretary of Agriculture. He formerly served as Secretary of Agriculture during the Obama Administration, and was the 40th Governor of Iowa.[1] He has served as President and CEO of the U.S. Dairy Export Council,[2] and on the Board of Directors of Feeding America.[3]

Department of Commerce

Department of Defense

Gen. Lloyd Austin is the Secretary of Defense. He is a retired four-star general in the United States Army, formerly serving as the 12th Commander of United States Central Command, as Vice Chief of Staff of the Army, and as the commanding general of United States Forces-Iraq.[4] He has served on the Board of Directors of Tenet Healthcare Corporation,[5] Nucor Corporation,[6] Raytheon Technologies,[7] and the Carnegie Corporation of New York.[8]

Kathleen Hicks is Deputy Secretary of Defense. She was the team lead for the Biden-Harris Transition Department of Defense Agency Review Team, and formerly served as Senior Vice President and Director of the International Security Program at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. During the Obama Administration, she served as Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Strategy, Plans, and Forces and Principal Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for Policy.[9] She has served as a member of the board of trustees for The Aerospace Corporation, the board of directors for the U.S. Naval Institute,[10] and the advisory council of National Security Action.[11]

Department of Education

Department of Energy

Jennifer Granholm is Secretary of Energy. Granholm served as the 47th Governor of Michigan from 2003-2011, and as Attorney General of Michigan from 1999-2003.[12] She was also a professor at the University of California, Berkeley, and a senior research fellow at the Berkeley Energy and Climate Institute and the Berkeley Center for Information Technology Research in the Interests of Society.[13] She is the founder of the American Jobs Project, where she also served as Board Chair,[14] and has served as an advisor to the Clean Energy Program at the Pew Charitable Trusts.[15] She was a member of the presidential transition team for President Obama in 2008,[16] and was a co-chair of Hillary Clinton’s transition team in 2016.[17] She also served in leadership positions at the pro-Hillary Clinton Super PACs Priorities USA Action and Correct the Record.[18]

Department of Health and Human Services

Department of Homeland Security

Alejandro Mayorkas is Secretary of Homeland Security. He formerly served as a Partner at the law firm of WilmerHale. During the Obama Administration, he was Deputy Secretary of Homeland Security and Director of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. He was also head of President Obama’s U.S. Department of Justice Criminal Division transition team in 2008, and served as a U.S. Attorney in the Justice Department during the Clinton Administration.[19]

In January 2021, the Daily Caller reported that Mayorkas had received $3.3 million in the preceding year as a Partner at WilmerHale, according to financial disclosure forms. His clients at the firm included Uber, Cisco, Clorox, Blackstone, Airbnb, Mission Support Alliance, and Intuit. He also represented NiSource, Inc. against charges related to the role that one of its subsidiaries played in the September 2018 Massachusetts gas explosions. The Daily Caller also noted a Department of Homeland Security inspector general report from 2015 that said Mayorkas “exerted improper influence” in the EB-5 visa program approval process for GreenTech Automotive, a company that was owned by Terry McAuliffe and Tony Rodham. Mayorkas was serving as Director of U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services in the Obama Administration at the time.[20]

Department of Housing and Urban Development

Department of the Interior

Department of Justice

Department of Labor

Department of State

Antony Blinken is Secretary of State. He was formerly a co-founder and Managing Partner at WestExec Advisors, LLC,[21] a Partner at the private equity firm Pine Island Capital Partners,[22] and Managing Director of the Penn Biden Center for Diplomacy and Global Engagement. He served in the Obama Administration as National Security Advisor to Vice President Biden, as Assistant to the President and Principal Deputy National Security Advisor, and as Deputy Secretary of State. Before that, he was Democratic Staff Director for the U.S. Senate Foreign Relations Committee from 2002-2008, a member of the National Security Council staff from 1994-2001 during the Clinton Administration, and a reporter for The New Republic.[23] He has served as Vice-Chair of the board of directors of Human Rights First,[24] as a member of the advisory board of Foreign Policy for America,[25] and as a member of the advisory council of National Security Action.[26]

Linda Thomas-Greenfield is United States Ambassador to the United Nations. She had led the Africa Practice at Albright Stonebridge Group since 2017, and was a Distinguished Resident Fellow in African Studies at the Institute for the Study of Diplomacy at Georgetown University from 2017-2019. During the Obama Administration from 2013-2017, she served as Assistant Secretary for the Bureau of African Affairs at the U.S. Department of State, and before that as Director General of the Foreign Service and Director of Human Resources from 2012-2013.[27] She also served as U.S. Ambassador to Liberia from 2008-2012, having been nominated by the George W. Bush Administration.[28] She has served on the Board of Directors of the National Endowment for Democracy,[29] and as a member of the Advisory Council of National Security Action.[30]

Though Thomas-Greenfield was confirmed by a 78-20 vote in the Senate, some Republican Senators expressed concern over a speech she gave at the Savannah State University Confucius Institute in 2019, in which she described Chinese intervention in Africa as a “win-win-win situation” whereby China and the United States could promote good governance and the rule of law. She stated that China was “in a unique position to spread these ideals given its strong footprint on the continent.” Thomas-Greenfield expressed regret at her confirmation hearing, noting that she wished she “had not accepted this specific invitation,” and conveying her alarm “at the way the Confucius Institute was engaging with the Black community in Georgia.”[31]

Department of Transportation

Pete Buttigieg is Secretary of Transportation. He is the former mayor of South Bend, Indiana and unsuccessfully sought the Democratic Party’s 2020 Presidential nomination. He also formerly served as an intelligence officer in the United States Navy Reserve, as a consultant for McKinsey & Company, and worked on John Kerry’s 2004 Presidential campaign.[32]

Department of the Treasury

Janet Yellen is Secretary of the Treasury. She was formerly a Distinguished Fellow in Residence at the Brookings Institution and Professor Emerita at the University of California, Berkeley. She also formerly served as Chair of the Federal Reserve Board from 2014-2018 as an Obama Administration nominee, and before that was Vice Chair of the Federal Reserve Board from 2010-2014, President and CEO of the Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco from 2004-2010, and Chair of the White House Council of Economic Advisors from 1997-1999 during the Clinton Administration. She has served as President of the American Economic Association, as a member of the advisory boards of the Bloomberg New Economy Forum, the Committee for a Responsible Federal Budget, and the Fix the Debt Coalition, and on the steering committee of the Washington Center for Equitable Growth. She has also held memberships in the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, the Economic Strategy Group of the Aspen Institute, the Group of Thirty, the Council on Foreign Relations, and the Climate Leadership Council.[33]

Department of Veterans Affairs

Denis McDonough is Secretary of Veterans Affairs. He was formerly a Senior Advisor and Senior Principal at the Markle Foundation,[34] a Partner at Macro Advisory Partners,[35] and a Professor at the University of Notre Dame’s Keough School of Global Affairs.[36] He was Senior Foreign Policy Advisor for President Obama’s 2008 campaign, and served in the Obama Administration as Assistant to the President and Principal Deputy National Security Advisor from 2010-2013 and as White House Chief of Staff from 2013-2017. Prior to that, he worked in both the U.S. House of Representatives and the Senate. He has served on the Board of Directors of Catalyte, the National Democratic Institute, and the SAFE Project, and as a member of the Advisory Council of the Tent Partnership for Refugees.[37]

Executive Office of the President

Kate Bedingfield is White House Communications Director. She served as Deputy Campaign Manager and Communications Director for Biden’s 2020 Presidential campaign. During the Obama Administration, she was Communications Director for Vice President Biden, as well as Associate Communications Director, Deputy Director of Media Affairs, and Director of Response. Before that, she served as Communications Director for U.S. Senator Jeanne Shaheen’s (D-NH) 2008 Senate campaign, Deputy National Press Secretary for John Edwards’ 2008 Presidential campaign, and Regional Press Secretary for the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee. She has also served as Chief Spokeswoman and Vice President of Corporate Communications at the Motion Picture Association of America (MPAA) and as Vice President of Communications at Monumental Sports & Entertainment.[38]

Brian Deese is Director of the National Economic Council. He formerly served as Global Head of Sustainable Investing at BlackRock, Inc., focused on environmental, social and governance (ESG) issues. During the Obama Administration, Deese was senior advisor to the President on climate and energy policy, and helped negotiate the Paris Climate Agreement. He also formerly served as Deputy Director of the National Economic Council and Deputy Director of the U.S. Office of Management and Budget. He has also lectured at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government.[39]

Anita Dunn is Senior Advisor to the President, and served as a senior advisor on Biden’s 2020 presidential campaign. Dunn is on leave from her position as a partner and founding member at SKDK (formerly known as SKDKnickerbocker). She was a senior advisor on President Obama’s 2008 presidential campaign, and briefly served in the Obama Administration as White House Communications Director. She has also served in a variety of roles for former Senators Tom Daschle (D-SD), Evan Bayh (D-IN), and Bill Bradley (D-NJ).[40]

In February 2021, The Guardian obtained an advance copy of the book “Lucky: How Joe Biden Barely Won the Presidency” by journalists Jonathan Allen and Amie Parnes. It reported that in the book Dunn was quoted as remarking to an associate that “Covid is the best thing that ever happened to him,” referring to then-candidate Biden. The comment was characterized by the authors as something “campaign officials believed but would never say in public.”[41]

Anne Filipic is Director of Management & Administration. She formerly served as Chief Program Officer and Chief Operating Officer at the Obama Foundation. Before that, she was President of Enroll America, a coalition formed to promote enrollment in Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (Obamacare) insurance plans. During the Obama Administration, she served as Deputy Director of Public Engagement at the White House, and Deputy Director of Intergovernmental Affairs at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. She also formerly served as Deputy Executive Director of the Democratic National Committee and on President Obama’s 2008 Presidential campaign.[42]

Hartina Flournoy is Chief of Staff to the Vice President. She previously served as Chief of Staff to former President Bill Clinton, and as Assistant to the President for Public Policy at the American Federation of Teachers. She has held numerous past positions within the Democratic Party including head of Howard Dean’s Democratic National Committee transition team, traveling chief of staff to vice presidential nominee Joe Lieberman and Finance Director during Al Gore’s 2000 Presidential campaign, Deputy to the Campaign Manager for President Clinton’s 1992 transition office, General Counsel for the 1992 Democratic National Convention, and Counsel to the Democratic National Committee under Chairs Paul Kirk and Ron Brown. During the Clinton Administration, she served in the White House Office of Presidential Personnel.[43]

John Kerry is Special Presidential Envoy for Climate. During the Obama Administration he served as Secretary of State at the U.S. Department of State, and signed the Paris Climate Agreement on behalf of the United States. He previously served as a U.S. Senator from Massachusetts, first elected in 1984, and before that was Lieutenant Governor of Massachusetts. He served in the U.S. Navy during the Vietnam War, receiving multiple decorations including the Silver Star.[44] He was the Democratic Party’s 2004 nominee for President of the United States.

In the early days of the Biden administration it was reported by Fox News that Kerry’s family still owned a private jet, according to Federal Aviation Administration records. The report noted that private jets can emit up to 40 times as much carbon per passenger as commercial flights.[45] Fox News later reported that Kerry had traveled to Iceland in a private jet in order to receive an award for climate leadership in 2019, having noted at the time that “[i]f you offset your carbon – it’s the only choice for somebody like me who is traveling the world to win this battle.”[46]

Ron Klain is White House Chief of Staff. He has worked on the campaigns of Democratic Presidential candidates Bill Clinton, Al Gore, John Kerry, Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton, and Joe Biden. During the Obama Administration, Klain served as Chief of Staff to then-Vice President Biden from 2009-2011, and as the White House Ebola Response Coordinator from 2014-2015. During the Clinton Administration, he served as Chief of Staff to Vice President Al Gore, Chief of Staff and Counselor to Attorney General Janet Reno, and as Associate Counsel to President Clinton. He has also served as Executive Vice President and General Counsel at Revolution LLC, a venture capital firm, and as a Partner at the law firm of O’Melveny & Myers. He was a clerk to former Supreme Court Justice Byron White, and served as Chief Counsel to the Senate Judiciary Committee from 1989-1992.[47] Klain has served as a member of the Board of Directors of the Center for American Progress Action Fund,[48] the Democracy Forward Foundation,[49] and the Truman National Security Project,[50] and as an external advisor to the Skoll Global Threats Fund.[51]

Catherine Lhamon is Deputy Director of the Domestic Policy Council for Racial Justice and Equity. She chairs the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, to which she was appointed by President Obama in 2016. She served as Legal Affairs Secretary to California Governor Gavin Newsom until December 2020, and was also previously an attorney at the National Center for Youth Law.[52] During the Obama Administration, she served as Assistant Secretary for Civil Rights at the U.S. Department of Education. Before that, she was director of impact litigation at Public Counsel, assistant legal director at the ACLU of Southern California, and a teaching fellow and supervising attorney in the Appellate Litigation Program at Georgetown University Law Center.[53] Lhamon was listed by Demand Justice on its Supreme Court Shortlist.[54]

Gina McCarthy is National Climate Advisor. She is the former President and Chief Executive Officer of the Natural Resources Defense Council. She also formerly served as a Professor at Harvard University’s T.H. Chan School of Public Health and as chair of the board of directors of the Harvard Center for Climate, Health, and the Global Environment.[55] During the Obama Administration, she served as the 13th Administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, where she oversaw the administration’s Clean Power Plan, and as Assistant Administrator for the Office of Air and Radiation. She has also served as Commissioner of the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection (where she was instrumental in developing the Regional Greenhouse Gas Initiative), Deputy Secretary of the Massachusetts Office of Commonwealth Development, and as Undersecretary of Policy for the Massachusetts Executive Office of Environmental Affairs. She has served on the board of directors of the Energy Foundation and Ceres.[56]

As reported by the National Review, the former mayor of Flint, Michigan, Karen Weaver, faulted McCarthy for the EPA’s delayed response to that city’s multi-year water crisis and expressed her disappointment that President Biden had placed her in charge of the White House Office of Climate Policy. During congressional testimony in March 2017, McCarthy stated her regret that “[w]e missed the opportunity to quickly get EPA’s concerns on the radar screen.”[57]

Jen O’Malley Dillon is White House Deputy Chief of Staff. She was Campaign Manger for Biden’s 2020 presidential campaign, and prior to that for Beto O’Rourke’s 2020 campaign. She was a founding partner at the communications firm Precision Strategies, and also formerly served as Deputy Campaign Manager for President Obama’s 2012 re-election campaign, as Executive Director of the Democratic National Committee, and battleground states director for Obama’s 2008 campaign.[58] She also worked on John Edwards’ 2004 and 2008 presidential campaigns, and was a political consultant to Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.[59]

Jen Psaki is White House Press Secretary. She formerly served as Vice President for Communications and Strategy at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, and as a contributor to CNN. During the Obama Administration, she served as White House Communications Director, Spokesperson at the U.S. Department of State under then-Secretary John Kerry, Deputy White House Communications Director, and Deputy White House Press Secretary. She served as Deputy Press Secretary for John Kerry’s 2004 Presidential campaign, and as Traveling Press Secretary on Barack Obama’s 2008 and 2012 campaigns. She has also served as a spokesperson for the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee and as Communications Director for former Rep. Joe Crowley (D-NY).[60] She was also formerly Senior Vice President at the consulting firm Global Strategy Group,[61] and a member of the advisory council at National Security Action.[62]

Gautam Raghavan is Deputy Director of the White House Office of Presidential Personnel. He was Deputy Head of Presidential Appointments for the Biden-Harris Transition. Before that, he served as Chief of Staff to Rep. Pramila Jayapal (D-WA), as an advisor to the Biden Foundation, and as Vice President of Policy at the Gill Foundation. During the Obama Administration, he served as a White House liaison to the LGBTQ and the Asian American & Pacific Islander communities, as well as in the White House Liaison Office for the U.S. Department of Defense. He was Outreach Lead for the “Don’t Ask, Don’t Tell” Working Group at the Pentagon.[63] Before that, he was director of the Asian American Finance Committee for Barack Obama’s 2008 Presidential Campaign, and Midwest Finance Director for the Democratic National Committee.[64]

Bruce Reed is White House Deputy Chief of Staff. He was most recently a Senior Advisor on Biden’s 2020 Presidential campaign,[65] the Founder and Chief Executive Officer of the public policy company Civic, and Co-Chair of the Future of Work Initiative at the Aspen Institute, where he was also a member of the Aspen Economic Strategy Group. Before that, he was President of the Broad Foundation. During the Obama Administration, he served as Chief of Staff to Vice President Biden and Executive Director of the Bowles-Simpson deficit reduction commission. During the Clinton Administration, he served as President Clinton’s chief domestic policy advisor. He was Deputy Campaign Manager on Clinton’s 1992 Presidential campaign, Policy Director for then-Governor Clinton at the Democratic Leadership Council, and chief speechwriter for then-Senator Al Gore (D-TN). He has been a senior fellow at Results for America, and a contributor to Slate and The New Republic.[66]

Dana Remus is White House Counsel. She served as General Counsel on Joe Biden’s 2020 Presidential campaign, and before that was General Counsel at the Obama Foundation and the personal office of former President Barack Obama and First Lady Michelle Obama. During the Obama Administration, she served as Deputy Assistant to the President and Deputy Counsel for Ethics. She also formerly served as a law professor at the University of North Carolina, an associate attorney at the law firm of Cravath, Swaine & Moore, and clerked for U.S. Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito.[67]

Steve Ricchetti is Counselor to the President. He was Chairman of Biden’s 2020 Presidential campaign, and before that served as Managing Director of the Penn Biden Center at the University of Pennsylvania. During the Obama Administration, he served as Assistant to the President and Chief of Staff to Vice President Biden. During the Clinton Administration, he served as Assistant to the President and Deputy Chief of Staff to President Clinton, and Deputy Assistant to the President for Legislative Affairs. He was Executive Director of the Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee in 1992.[68] He also served as a member of the Advisory Council of National Security Action.[69]

Steve Ricchetti is the brother of prominent lobbyist Jeff Ricchetti, and the two co-founded the lobbying firm Ricchetti, Inc. in 2001. Though Steve Ricchetti de-registered as a lobbyist in 2009, the Center for Responsive Politics reported in January 2021 that Jeff Ricchetti had made $610,000 in lobbying revenue from October through December 2020, with clients that included Amazon, Evofem Bioscience, Eagle Pharmaceuticals, Neurocrine Biosciences, Vaxart, GlaxoSmithKline, and Horizon Therapeutics.[70]

Susan Rice is Director of the Domestic Policy Council. She was most recently a Distinguished Visiting Research Fellow at American University and a Non-Resident Senior Fellow at Harvard University’s Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs. During the Obama Administration, she served as National Security Advisor from 2013-2017 and as U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations from 2009-2013. During the Clinton Administration, she served as Assistant Secretary of State for African Affairs at the U.S. Department of State, Special Assistant to the President and Senior Director for African Affairs, and Director for International Organizations and Peacekeeping at the National Security Council.[71] She was a Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution from 2002-2008, and also worked as a consultant at McKinsey & Company early in her career. She has served on the boards of the Bureau of National Affairs, the National Democratic Institute, and the U.S. Fund for UNICEF.[72] She was a member of the advisory council of National Security Action.[73]

Catherine Russell is Director of the White House Office of Presidential Personnel. She was Vice Chair of Biden’s 2020 Presidential Campaign and served on the advisory board of the Biden-Harris Transition. Prior to that, she was a fellow at the Institute of Politics at Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government. During the Obama Administration, she served as Deputy Assistant to the President and Chief of Staff to Second Lady Dr. Jill Biden, as well as U.S. Ambassador for Global Women’s Issues. She also formerly served as a senior advisor on international women’s issues for the U.S. Senate Foreign Relations Committee, as Associate Deputy Attorney General at the U.S. Department of Justice, as staff director for the U.S. Senate Committee on the Judiciary, and as senior counsel to Sen. Patrick Leahy (D-VT). She has also served as co-chair of the board of the Women’s Foreign Policy Group, a board member of Women for Women International, an advisory council member at National Security Action, and a steering committee member at the Leadership Council for Women in National Security.[74]

Jake Sullivan is National Security Advisor. He was formerly a Senior Fellow at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace, and held teaching positions at Yale Law School, Dartmouth College, and the University of New Hampshire. He was a co-founder and co-chair of the advisory board for National Security Action, and served as a senior policy advisor on Hillary Clinton’s 2016 Presidential campaign. During the Obama Administration, he served as Deputy Assistant to the President and National Security Advisor to then-Vice President Biden. He also served as Director of the Policy Planning Staff at the U.S. Department of State and as Deputy Chief of Staff to Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.[75] Before that, he was Deputy Policy Director on Hillary Clinton’s 2008 Presidential campaign, and a member of the debate preparation team for Barack Obama’s campaign. He also served as a Senior Policy Advisor to Sen. Amy Klobuchar (D-MN), worked as an attorney at the law firm of Faegre & Benson LLP, and clerked for Supreme Court Justice Stephen Breyer.[76]

Louisa Terrell is Director of the White House Office of Legislative Affairs. She oversaw legislative affairs for the Biden-Harris Transition, and also was the former Executive Director of the Biden Foundation. During the Obama Administration, she served as Special Assistant to the President for Legislative Affairs. Before that, she was an Advisor to Chairman of the Federal Communications Commission Tom Wheeler, Deputy Chief of Staff to then-Senator Joe Biden (D-DE), and Chief of Staff to Senator Cory Booker (D-NJ). She has also served as Deputy General Counsel and Head of Public Affairs at McKinsey & Company, Senior Director for Federal Policy & Strategy at Yahoo!, and Director of Public Policy at Facebook.[77]

Ali Zaidi is Deputy National Climate Advisor. He formerly served as Deputy Secretary to the Governor for Energy and Environment for the state of New York, and as an adjunct professor at Stanford University where he co-founded the Lawyers for a Sustainable Economy initiative. During the Obama Administration, he served as Associate Director for Natural Resources, Energy, and Science in the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) and as Deputy Director of Energy Policy for the White House Domestic Policy Council.[78] At OMB, he served as the chief policy official for implementing the Climate Action Plan and was a member of the delegation that negotiated the Paris Agreement. He has served as Vice Chair of Carbon180, a member of the board of trustees of the Natural Resources Defense Council, co-chair of the Aspen Institute Energy and Environment Program’s Strategy Group on Future of Artificial Intelligence and Robotics, and as a director of America’s Promise Alliance and The Generations Initiative.[79]

Jeffrey Zients is Counselor to the President and Coordinator of the COVID-19 Response. He was formerly the Chief Executive Officer (CEO) of Cranemere, a business holding company, and has also served as the CEO and Chairman of the Advisory Board Company. During the Obama Administration, he served as Director of the National Economic Council, Deputy Director and Acting Director of the U.S. Office of Management and Budget, and as Chief Performance Officer of the United States.[80] He has also served as Chairman of the Corporate Executive Board, and founded the investment firm Portfolio Logic. He is a co-founder of the Urban Alliance Foundation,[81] and previously was a member of the board of directors of Facebook.[82]

Independent Agencies

Director of National Intelligence

Avril Haines is Director of National Intelligence. She formerly held various positions at Columbia University, including Senior Research Scholar, was a Senior Fellow at the Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory, and a member of the National Commission on Military, National, and Public Service. During the Obama Administration, she served as National Security Council Legal Advisor, as Deputy Director of the Central Intelligence Agency from 2013-2015, and as Assistant to the President and Principal Deputy National Security Advisor from 2015-2017. She was Deputy Chief Counsel to the U.S. Senate Committee on Foreign Relations from 2007-2008, while then-Senator Biden served as Chair.[83] She has been a Distinguished Fellow at Syracuse University’s Institute for Security Policy and Law,[84] a board member at the Center for a New American Security,[85] an advisory board member at Foreign Policy for America,[86] an advisory council member at Refugees International,[87] and a member of the Bio Advisory Group at the Nuclear Threat Initiative.[88] She has also served on the board of trustees at the Vodafone Foundation,[89] and as a member of the advisory council of National Security Action.[90]

As reported by The Intercept, Haines’s biography from her time as a Nonresident Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution listed her as a consultant for Palantir Technologies,[91] and she was also a former Principal at WestExec Advisors, LLC.[92] The archived biography from Brookings also lists additional affiliations, including as a member of the American Bar Association’s Standing Committee on Law and National Security, a member of the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace’s Encryption Working Group, an advisory council member of Network 20/20, an international advisory board member at Tikehau Investment Management, co-chair of the Simon Skojdt Center for the Prevention of Genocide Advisory Group at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum, and a member of the World Economic Forum’s Global Future Council on Geopolitics.[93]

Securities and Exchange Commission

Satyam Khanna is Senior Policy Advisor for Climate and ESG at the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC).[94] He formerly served as a resident fellow at New York University School of Law’s Institute for Corporate Governance and Finance, and as a member of the SEC’s Investor Advisory Committee. Prior to that, he was Counsel to former SEC Commissioner Robert Jackson. He has also been a fellow at Columbia Law School, an advisor at the Financial Stability Oversight Council at the U.S. Department of the Treasury, an attorney at the law firm of McDermott Will & Emery, and a research assistant to Evercore founder and senior chairman Roger Altman.[95]

References

  1. “Domestic Nominees and Appointees: Secretary Tom Vilsack.” Biden-Harris Transition. Accessed December 11, 2020. Available at: https://buildbackbetter.gov/nominees-and-appointees/tom-vilsack/ ^
  2. “Our Staff.” U.S. Dairy Export Council. Accessed December 11, 2020. Available at: https://www.usdec.org/about-us/our-staff ^
  3. “Secretary Tom Vilsack.” Feeding America. Accessed December 11, 2020. Available at: https://www.feedingamerica.org/about-us/leadership/Secretary-Tom-Vilsack ^
  4. “National Security Nominees and Appointees: General Lloyd Austin.” Biden-Harris Transition. Accessed December 11, 2020. Available at: https://buildbackbetter.gov/nominees-and-appointees/general-lloyd-austin/ ^
  5. “Board of Directors.” Tenet Healthcare Corporation. Accessed December 11, 2020. Available at: https://investor.tenethealth.com/governance/default.aspx ^
  6. “Board of Directors.” Nucor Corporation. Accessed December 11, 2020. Available at: https://nucor.com/leadership/ ^
  7. “Board of Directors.” Raytheon Technologies. Accessed December 11, 2020. Available at: https://www.rtx.com/our-company/corporate-governance ^
  8. “General Lloyd J. Austin III, U.S. Army (Ret.).” Carnegie Corporation of New York. Accessed December 11, 2020. Available at: https://www.carnegie.org/about/trustees-and-staff/general-lloyd-j-austin-iii-us-army-ret/ ^
  9. “National Security Nominees and Appointees: Dr. Kathleen Hicks.” Biden-Harris Transition. January 19, 2021 (accessed via Wayback Machine). Available at: https://web.archive.org/web/20210119201259/https://buildbackbetter.gov/nominees-and-appointees/dr-kathleen-hicks/ ^
  10. “Kathleen H. Hicks.” Center for Strategic and International Studies. May 7, 2020 (accessed via Wayback Machine). Available at: https://web.archive.org/web/20200507123902/https://www.csis.org/people/kathleen-h-hicks ^
  11. “Who We Are.” National Security Action. February 22, 2020 (accessed via Wayback Machine). Available at: https://web.archive.org/web/20200222211523/https://nationalsecurityaction.org/who-we-are/ ^
  12. “Jennifer Granholm.” Ballotpedia. Accessed December 18, 2020. Available at: https://ballotpedia.org/Jennifer_Granholm ^
  13. Reed, Bora. “Berkeley Scholar Jennifer Granholm Expected to Serve as Biden Energy Secretary.” Berkeley News. December 16, 2020. Accessed December 18, 2020. Available at: https://news.berkeley.edu/2020/12/16/berkeley-scholar-jennifer-granholm-expected-to-serve-as-biden-energy-secretary/ ^
  14. “Board.” American Jobs Project. Accessed December 18, 2020. Available at: http://americanjobsproject.us/about/board ^
  15. “Climate Nominees and Appointees: Fmr. Governor Jennifer Granholm.” Biden-Harris Transition. Accessed December 18, 2020. Available at: https://buildbackbetter.gov/nominees-and-appointees/jennifer-granholm/ ^
  16. Galer, Sarah. “Institute of Politics to Host Bipartisan Panel on 2012 Presidential Election.” UChicago News. May 17, 2012. Accessed December 18, 2020. Available at: https://news.uchicago.edu/story/institute-politics-host-bipartisan-panel-2012-presidential-election ^
  17. Becker, Amanda and Lopez, Luciana. “Clinton Names Close Confidants, Obama Veterans to Transition Team.” Reuters. August 16, 2016. Accessed December 18, 2020. Available at: https://www.reuters.com/article/us-usa-election-clinton-transition/clinton-names-close-confidants-obama-veterans-to-transition-team-idUSKCN10R11X ^
  18. Vogel, Kenneth P. “Granholm Resigns From Pro-Clinton Super PAC.” Politico. August 14, 2015. Accessed December 18, 2020. Available at: https://www.politico.com/story/2015/08/jennifer-granholm-resigns-from-pro-clinton-super-pac-121366 ^
  19. “Alejandro N. Mayorkas.” WilmerHale. Accessed December 11, 2020. Available at: https://www.wilmerhale.com/en/people/alejandro-mayorkas ^
  20. Ross, Chuck. “Mayorkas Raked in Millions at Corporate Law Firm, Where he Represented Utility Company Responsible for Fatal Gas Explosion.” The Daily Caller. January 17, 2021. Accessed January 18, 2021. Available at: https://dailycaller.com/2021/01/17/alejandro-mayorkas-millions-law-biden-dhs/ ^
  21. “Antony Blinken.” WestExec Advisors, LLC. Accessed December 11, 2020. Available at: https://westexec.com/antony-blinken/ ^
  22. “Our Team.” Pine Island Capital Partners. Accessed December 11, 2020. Available at: https://pineislandcp.com/team/ ^
  23. “National Security Nominees and Appointees: Antony Blinken.” Biden-Harris Transition. Accessed December 11, 2020. Available at: https://buildbackbetter.gov/nominees-and-appointees/antony-blinken/ ^
  24. “Board of Directors.” Human Rights First. Accessed December 11, 2020. Available at: https://www.humanrightsfirst.org/about/board-of-directors ^
  25. “Leadership.” Foreign Policy for America. Accessed December 11, 2020. Available at: https://www.fp4america.org/our-leadership ^
  26. “Who We Are.” National Security Action. July 22, 2020 (accessed via Wayback Machine). Available at: https://web.archive.org/web/20200722011803/https://nationalsecurityaction.org/who-we-are/ ^
  27. “National Security Nominees and Appointees: Linda Thomas-Greenfield.” Biden-Harris Transition. Accessed January 14, 2021. Available at: https://buildbackbetter.gov/nominees-and-appointees/linda-thomas-greenfield/ ^
  28. Finnegan, Conor. “Veteran Diplomat Linda Thomas-Greenfield Returns as Biden’s Pick for UN Envoy.” ABC News. December 1, 2020. Accessed January 14, 2021. Available at: https://abcnews.go.com/Politics/veteran-diplomat-linda-thomas-greenfield-returns-bidens-pick/story?id=74408696 ^
  29. Return of Organization Exempt from Income Tax (Form 990): National Endowment for Democracy. 2019. Part VII. ^
  30. “Who We Are.” National Security Action. April 3, 2019 (Accessed via Wayback Machine). Available at: https://web.archive.org/web/20190403030603/https://nationalsecurityaction.org/who-we-are/ ^
  31. Adam Shaw and Ben Evansky. “Senate Confirms Linda-Thomas Greenfield as UN Ambassador, Despite Controversy Over China Remarks.” Fox News. February 23, 2021. Available at: https://www.foxnews.com/politics/senate-linda-thomas-greenfield-un-ambassador ^
  32. “Pete Buttigieg.” Ballotpedia. Accessed December 16, 2020. Available at: https://ballotpedia.org/Pete_Buttigieg ^ ^
  33. “Janet L. Yellen.” Brookings Institution. Accessed December 11, 2020. Available at: https://www.brookings.edu/experts/janet-l-yellen/ ^
  34. “Denis McDonough.” Markle Foundation. Accessed December 11, 2020. Available at: https://www.markle.org/about-markle/staff/denis-mcdonough ^
  35. “The Firm.” Macro Advisory Partners. Accessed December 11, 2020. Available at: https://www.macroadvisorypartners.com/the-firm ^
  36. “Denis McDonough.” Keough School of Global Affairs. Accessed December 11, 2020. Available at: https://keough.nd.edu/profile/denis-mcdonough/ ^
  37. “Denis McDonough.” Markle Foundation. Accessed December 11, 2020. Available at: https://www.markle.org/about-markle/staff/denis-mcdonough  ^
  38. “White House Senior Staff: Kate Bedingfield.” Biden-Harris Transition. January 19, 2021 (accessed via WayBack Machine). Available at: https://web.archive.org/web/20210119201849/https://buildbackbetter.gov/nominees-and-appointees/kate-bedingfield/ ^
  39. “Brian Deese.” BlackRock. Accessed January 27, 2021. Available at: https://www.blackrock.com/institutions/en-us/biographies/brian-deese ^
  40. “Anita Dunn” SKDK. Accessed February 26, 2021. Available at: http://www.skdknick.com/staff/anita-dunn/ ^
  41. Martin Pengelly. “Key Biden Aide Said Pandemic Was ‘Best Thing That Ever Happened to Him,’ Book Says.” The Guardian. February 24, 2021. Available at: https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2021/feb/24/covid-best-thing-biden-anita-dunn-lucky-book-jonathan-allen-annie-parnes ^
  42. “White House Senior Staff: Anne Filipic.” Biden-Harris Transition. January 19, 2021 (accessed via WayBack Machine). Available at: https://web.archive.org/web/20210119201948/https://buildbackbetter.gov/nominees-and-appointees/anne-filipic/ ^
  43. “White House Senior Staff: Hartina Flournoy.” Biden-Harris Transition. January 19, 2021 (accessed via WayBack Machine). Available at: https://web.archive.org/web/20210119202017/https://buildbackbetter.gov/nominees-and-appointees/hartina-flournoy/ ^
  44. “National Security Nominees and Appointees: Fmr. Secretary John Kerry.” Biden-Harris Transition. January 15, 2021 (accessed via Wayback Machine). Available at: https://web.archive.org/web/20210115174612/https://buildbackbetter.gov/nominees-and-appointees/john-kerry/ ^
  45. Dorman, Sam. “John Kerry’s Family Still Owns Private Jet as He Leads Climate Fight, FAA Records Indicate.” Fox News. January 27, 2021. Available at: https://www.foxnews.com/politics/john-kerry-private-jet-climate-change ^
  46. Dorman, Sam. “John Kerry Took Private Jet to Iceland for Environmental Award, Called it ‘Only Choice for Somebody Like Me.'” Fox News. February 3, 2021. Available at: https://www.foxnews.com/politics/john-kerry-private-jet-iceland-climate-award ^
  47. “White House Senior Staff: Ron Klain.” Biden-Harris Transition. Accessed January 14, 2021. Available at: https://buildbackbetter.gov/nominees-and-appointees/ron-klain/ ^
  48. Return of Organization Exempt from Income Tax (Form 990): Center for American Progress Action Fund. 2018. Part VII. ^
  49. Return of Organization Exempt from Income Tax (Form 990): Democracy Forward Foundation. 2018. Part VII. ^
  50. Return of Organization Exempt from Income Tax (Form 990): Truman National Security Project. 2014. Part VII ^
  51. Klain, Ronald A. “A Success Not to be Repeated.” AAMC. September 29, 2016. Accessed January 14, 2021. Available at: https://www.aamc.org/news-insights/success-not-be-repeated ^
  52. “White House Senior Staff: Catherine Lhamon.” Biden-Harris Transition. February 19, 2021 (accessed via WayBack Machine). Available at: https://web.archive.org/web/20210119010608/https://buildbackbetter.gov/nominees-and-appointees/catherine-lhamon/ ^
  53. “Catherine E. Lhamon.” U.S. Commission on Civil Rights. Accessed February 19, 2021. Available at: https://www.usccr.gov/about/bio/Lhamon.php ^
  54. “Supreme Court Shortlist.” Demand Justice. Accessed February 19, 2021. Available at: https://demandjustice.org/supreme-court-shortlist/#Catherine_Lhamon ^
  55. “White House Senior Staff: Gina McCarthy.” Biden-Harris Transition. January 17, 2021 (accessed via Wayback Machine). Available at: https://web.archive.org/web/20210117224947/https://buildbackbetter.gov/nominees-and-appointees/gina-mccarthy/ ^
  56. “Gina McCarthy.” Natural Resources Defense Council. Accessed January 27, 2021. Available at: https://www.nrdc.org/experts/gina-mccarthy ^
  57. McArdle, Mairead. “Lack of Dem Indictments in Flint Water Probe Raises Concerns About Political Prosecution.” National Review. January 24, 2021. Accessed January 27, 2021. Available at: https://www.nationalreview.com/news/indictments-of-republicans-over-flint-water-crisis-raise-concerns-about-political-prosecution/ ^
  58. “White House Senior Staff: Jen O’Malley Dillon.” Biden-Harris Transition. January 19, 2021 (accessed via WayBack Machine). Available at: https://web.archive.org/web/20210119201840/https://buildbackbetter.gov/nominees-and-appointees/jen-omalley-dillon/ ^
  59. Eric Bradner and Jeff Zeleny. “Joe Biden Hires Jen O’Malley Dillon as Campaign Manager in Staff Shakeup.” CNN. March 12, 2020. Accessed February 16, 2021. Available at: https://www.cnn.com/2020/03/12/politics/biden-campaign-manager/index.html ^
  60. “White House Senior Staff: Jen Psaki.” Biden-Harris Transition. January 19, 2021 (accessed via Wayback Machine). Available at: https://web.archive.org/web/20210119201928/https://buildbackbetter.gov/nominees-and-appointees/jen-psaki/ ^
  61. “Jen Psaki.” Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. February 1, 2021. Available at: https://carnegieendowment.org/experts/1399 ^
  62. “Who We Are.” National Security Action. February 22, 2020 (accessed via Wayback Machine). Available at: https://web.archive.org/web/20200222211523/https://nationalsecurityaction.org/who-we-are/#advisory-council ^
  63. “White House Senior Staff: Gautam Raghavan.” Biden-Harris Transition. January 19, 2021 (accessed via WayBack Machine). Available at: https://web.archive.org/web/20210119201901/https://buildbackbetter.gov/nominees-and-appointees/gautam-raghavan/ ^
  64. “Gautam Raghavan – Chief of Staff, Congresswoman Pramila Jayapal.” AAPI Progressive Action. Accessed February 16, 2021. Available at: https://www.aapiprogressiveaction.com/gautam-2019 ^
  65. “White House Senior Staff: Bruce Reed.” Biden-Harris Transition. January 19, 2021 (accessed via WayBack Machine). Available at: https://web.archive.org/web/20210119202059/https://buildbackbetter.gov/nominees-and-appointees/bruce-reed/ ^
  66. “Our Staff.” Civic. Accessed February 22, 2021. Available at: https://www.civicllc.com/our-staff ^
  67. “White House Senior Staff: Dana Remus.” Biden-Harris Transition. January 19, 2021 (accessed via WayBack Machine. Available at: https://web.archive.org/web/20210119201959/https://buildbackbetter.gov/nominees-and-appointees/dana-remus/ ^
  68. “White House Senior Staff: Steve Ricchetti.” Biden-Harris Transition. January 19, 2021 (accessed via Wayback Machine). Available at: https://web.archive.org/web/20210119201955/https://buildbackbetter.gov/nominees-and-appointees/steve-ricchetti/ ^
  69. “Who We Are.” National Security Action. February 22, 2020 (accessed via Wayback Machine). Available at: https://web.archive.org/web/20200222210430/https://nationalsecurityaction.org/who-we-are/ ^
  70. Evers-Hillstrom, Karl. “Biden Adviser’s Lobbyist Brother Cashes in After Biden Win.” January 25, 2021. Available at: https://www.opensecrets.org/news/2021/01/biden-adviser-brother-lobbyist/ ^
  71. “White House Senior Staff: Ambassador Susan Rice.” Biden-Harris Transition. January 19, 2021 (accessed via Wayback Machine). Available at: https://web.archive.org/web/20210119202041/https://buildbackbetter.gov/nominees-and-appointees/susan-rice/ ^
  72. “Susan E. Rice.” Harvard Kennedy School. Accessed February 3, 2021. Available at: https://www.belfercenter.org/person/susan-e-rice ^
  73. “Who We Are.” National Security Action. April 3, 2019 (accessed via Wayback Machine). Available at: https://web.archive.org/web/20190403005042/https://nationalsecurityaction.org/who-we-are/ ^
  74. “White House Senior Staff: Cathy Russell.” Biden-Harris Transition. January 19, 2021 (accessed via WayBack Machine). Available at: https://web.archive.org/web/20210119201930/https://buildbackbetter.gov/nominees-and-appointees/cathy-russell/ ^
  75. “White House Senior Staff: Jake Sullivan.” Biden-Harris Transition. January 19, 2021 (accessed via Wayback Machine). Available at: https://web.archive.org/web/20210119201926/https://buildbackbetter.gov/nominees-and-appointees/jake-sullivan/ ^
  76. “Jake Sullivan.” Harvard Kennedy School. Accessed January 28, 2021. Available at: https://www.belfercenter.org/person/jake-sullivan ^
  77. “White House Senior Staff: Louisa Terrell.” Biden-Harris Transition. January 19, 2021 (accessed via WayBack Machine). Available at: https://web.archive.org/web/20210119202104/https://buildbackbetter.gov/nominees-and-appointees/louisa-terrell/ ^
  78. “White House Senior Staff: Ali Zaidi.” Biden-Harris Transition. January 19, 2021 (accessed via WayBack Machine). Available at: https://web.archive.org/web/20210119201908/https://buildbackbetter.gov/nominees-and-appointees/ali-zaidi/ ^
  79. “Ali Zaidi.” Stanford University. Accessed February 19, 2021. Available at: https://energy.stanford.edu/people/ali-zaidi ^
  80. “White House Senior Staff: Jeff Zients.” Biden-Harris Transition. January 19, 2021 (accessed via WayBack Machine). Available at: https://web.archive.org/web/20210119201935/https://buildbackbetter.gov/nominees-and-appointees/jeff-zients/ ^
  81. Cranemere Official Website Homepage. October 21, 2020 (accessed via Wayback Machine). Available at: https://web.archive.org/web/20201021012852/https://www.cranemere.com/ ^
  82. Alice Miranda Ollstein and Tyler Pager. “Zients, Murthy Tapped to Head Up Biden’s Covid-19 Response.” Politico. December 3, 2020. Accessed February 1, 2021. Available at: https://www.politico.com/news/2020/12/03/zients-murthy-biden-coronavirus-team-442609 ^
  83. “National Security Nominees and Appointees: Avril Haines.” Biden-Harris Transition. Accessed December 11, 2020. Available at: https://buildbackbetter.gov/nominees-and-appointees/avril-haines/ ^
  84. “Distinguished Fellows.” Syracuse University Institute for Security Policy and Law. Accessed December 11, 2020. Available at: https://securitypolicylaw.syr.edu/about_the_institute_for_security_policy_and_law/people/distinguished-fellows/ ^
  85. “Avril Haines.” Center for a New American Security. Accessed December 11, 2020. Available at: https://www.cnas.org/people/avril-haines ^
  86. “Leadership.” Foreign Policy for America. Accessed December 11, 2020. Available at: https://www.fp4america.org/our-leadership ^
  87. “Refugees International Advisory Council.” Refugees International. Accessed December 11, 2020. Available at: https://www.refugeesinternational.org/advisory-council ^
  88. “Board & Advisors.” Nuclear Threat Initiative. Accessed December 11, 2020. Available at: https://www.nti.org/about/board-and-advisors/ ^
  89. “Avril Haines.” Center for a New American Security. Accessed December 11, 2020. Available at: https://www.cnas.org/people/avril-haines ^
  90. “Who We Are.” National Security Action. June 4, 2020 (accessed via the Wayback Machine). Available at: https://web.archive.org/web/20200604180934/https://nationalsecurityaction.org/who-we-are/ ^
  91. Hussain, Murtaza. “Controversial Data-Mining Firm Palantir Vanishes From Biden Adviser’s Biography After She Joins Campaign.” The Intercept. June 26, 2020. Accessed December 11, 2020. Available at: https://theintercept.com/2020/06/26/biden-adviser-avril-haines-palantir/ ^
  92. Bender, Bryan and Meyer, Theodoric. “The Secretive Consulting Firm That’s Become Biden’s Cabinet in Waiting.” Politico. November 23, 2020. Accessed December 11, 2020. Available at: https://www.politico.com/news/2020/11/23/westexec-advisors-biden-cabinet-440072 ^
  93. “Avril Haines.” Brookings Institution. May 9, 2020 (accessed via the Wayback Machine). Available at: https://web.archive.org/web/20200509024324/https:/www.brookings.edu/experts/avril-haines/  ^
  94. “Satyam Khanna Named Senior Policy Advisor for Climate and ESG.” U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. February 1, 2021. Available at: https://www.sec.gov/news/press-release/2021-20 ^
  95. “Satyam Khanna.” New York University School of Law. Accessed February 12, 2021. Available at: https://www.law.nyu.edu/icgf/about/fellows/khanna ^

Directors, Employees & Supporters

  1. Kamala Harris
    Vice President of the United States
  2. Ronald Klain
    White House Chief of Staff
  3. Brian Deese
    Director of the National Economic Council
  4. Jake Sullivan
    National Security Advisor
  5. Anne Filipic
    Director of Management & Administration
  6. Joe Biden
    President of the United States
  See an error? Let us know!