Person

Michael Moore

Michael Moore 66ème Festival de Venise (Mostra) 9 (link) by nicolas genin from Paris, France is licensed CC BY-SA 2.0 (link)
Nationality:

American

Born:

April 23, 1954 in Flint, MI

Occupation:

Film Director/Producer

Liberal Political Activist

Former Editor, Mother Jones

Michael Moore is a left-wing documentary filmmaker, former editor of the left-wing magazine Mother Jones, and liberal activist. Moore was born in an up-state Michigan bedroom community outside Flint, Michigan[1] and has fashioned himself as a blue-collar working class champion, even though he never worked a traditional factory job.[2] He has created a number of movies and books[3] with repetitive themes that lampoon Republicans and castigate capitalism while promoting Moore’s left-wing policy agenda. [4]

Moore has often been criticized for failing to adhere to the left-wing values that he advocates. Most notably, Moore blasts capitalism in almost all his works but with a reported net worth of approximately $50 million and nine houses,[5] critics claim that he “swapped his working-class life in Flint for limousine liberal digs on Manhattan’s Upper West Side”[6] and that he got rich off the capitalistic system that he purports to despise.[7] Similarly, Moore has been accused of running his businesses as a “sweatshop” and mistreating his employees.[8] Moore also claims to support labor unions, but on more than one occasion he has opposed unionization of his employees. [9]

Moore’s movies push for liberal agenda items such as government-run healthcare,[10] revolutionary socialism,[11] and stringent gun control.[12]

Background

Michael Francis Moore was born in Davison, Michigan (near Flint) in 1954.[13] His father, Frank Moore, was a union member line worker for General Motors,[14] and his mother,Veronica Wall-Moore, was a secretary.[15]

In 1972, Moore won a seat on the Davison school board at age 18. Moore dropped out of the University of Michigan-Flint after one year and founded a liberal newspaper, The Flint Voice (later expanded state-wide as the Michigan Voice).[16]

In 1986, Moore served a brief four-month stint as the editor of the left-wing San Francisco-based Mother Jones magazine but was quickly fired, allegedly for inadequate job performance.[17]  Senior Mother Jones staff members criticized Moore as being so rigidly ideological that he opposed publication of a legitimate article simply because he disagreed with its conclusions.[18] Moore eventually settled his $2 million wrongful termination lawsuit for $58,000, which he used as seed funding for his first film, Roger & Me.[19]

Hypocrisy

Wealthy Anti-Capitalist

Moore has been widely criticized for the contrast between his significant person wealth his left-wing, redistributionist opinions regarding economics.

In 1997, former Moore ally Alexander Cockburn wrote a New York Press article excoriating Moore, pointing out that the left-wing filmmaker had attended his Flint movie premiere in a chauffeured stretch limousine and had written an entire page in his book belittling limousine drivers as “by and large … a creepy bunch.”[20]

During Moore’s 2014 divorce proceedings, it was revealed that in addition to his estimated $50 million net worth, he owned a 10,000-square-foot home on Torch Lake (valued at $2 million) and eight other properties across Michigan and New York, including a Manhattan condo that was once three apartments. [21]

Even Moore himself acknowledged the absurdity of his opulence. He was quoted in Salon saying, “average working stiffs were willing to pay seven bucks to see my movie. If they’re going to give me their money, what am I going to do with it? Get a big boat? I don’t think so.” The author noted, “Nope. He got a $1.27 million apartment instead.”[22]

In another report, the Weekly Standard quoted an unnamed studio source who claimed to have been berated for not flying Moore in first class or for expecting him to stay anywhere but the Four Seasons hotel. The source labeled Moore “the greediest man [he’d] ever met.”[23]

In a 2011 interview with CNN anchor Piers Morgan, Moore refused to accept that he was part of the richest one percent of Americans. Morgan said, “I need you to admit the bleeding obvious. I need you to sit here and say, ‘I’m in the one percent.’ Because it’s important.” Moore denied Morgan’s claim.[24] Appearing at a 2011 Occupy Portland rally, Moore called upon rich Americans to “give back” $1 million, but himself refused to answer questions about how much of his $50 million he was willing to contribute.[25]

Allegations of Poor Working Conditions

The Weekly Standard has noted that many of Moore’s criticisms of poor working conditions in large corporations could just as easily be used to describe what it’s like to work for Michael Moore himself.[26] Quoting numerous former Moore employees, the article described the working conditions under Moore as “a sweatshop,” “a repressive police state,” “indentured servitude,” and “a concentration camp.” One former Moore-employed producer was quoted comparing a stint working for Moore to “working for [former Ugandan dictator] Idi Amin.”[27]

Another former employee said, “Moore became just another boss in a business that had an almost limitless tolerance for bad behavior,” describing him as selfish, self-absorbed, pouty, deeply conflicted, and a “huge a–hole.”[28]

Labor Unions

Moore has ardently advocated in support of labor unions and union privileges.[29] In 2011 he opposed a Wisconsin law reforming government worker collective bargaining and tweeted that he would not hire any non-unionized staff on his future movies.[30] In 2012, he joined pro-union rallies in Wisconsin.[31]

However, on a number of occasions as a private employer Moore has been decidedly anti-union. A 2011 Weekly Standard article pointed out that the leftist Moore didn’t provide health benefits to some of his employees and would fight “tooth and nail to try to avoid paying writers in the Writers Guild [labor union].”[32]

Echoing this sentiment, Daniel Radosh wrote in Salon that Moore discouraged writers from joining the Writers Guild and that once they did join, writers relied on the union to secure payments, credits and residuals that Moore was allegedly “trying to screw them out of.”[33] Moore called this allegation a lie;[34] but the author quickly noted that a spokesman for the Writers Guild confirmed that on more than one occasion writers came to the Guild for help in dealing with what they perceived as Moore’s unfair treatment.[35]

According to a Mother Jones report, Moore threatened a pair of employees that if they joined the union, he’d “only be able to afford one” and would fire the other.[36]

Film Career

Moore has produced or directed twelve documentaries and written eight non-fiction books, which have together grossed hundreds of millions of dollars worldwide.[37]

Despite the financial success of Moore’s enterprises, the left-leaning columnist from the Chicagoist blog noted that his movies generally speak only to like-minded liberals, “serving the Left in the same manner Fox News and AM talk radio serve the right.”[38]

Moore’s first movie, Roger & Me, was described as a sarcastic social commentary against a round of layoffs at General Motors. However, over the years, his extreme political beliefs have arguably reduced his movies and books into repetitive ideological “flamethrowers.”[39] In 1999, the Hartford Daily Courant wrote, “Moore’s tired routine has devolved into a bullying, pseudo-populist ‘Candid Camera.’” [40]

In Moore’s movie Capitalism: A Love Story, Moore argues that, “Capitalism is an evil… and you cannot regulate an evil. You have to eliminate it.”[41] He casts capitalism as responsible for the housing crisis, the recession, decaying cities and unemployment, and the bailout of financial firms at the expense of the middle class and in the end exhorts the audience to help him defeat the capitalist system.[42]

In his movie Sicko, Moore blasted America’s healthcare system as broken by greed. Moore later said that he hoped that the movie would inspire change towards a universal healthcare system.[43]

In the 2003 film Bowling For Columbine, which was billed as an anti-gun documentary, Moore implies through several hostile references to corporate greed, fraud and profits that manufacturing military hardware is to be blamed for gun violence in America.[44]

Fahrenheit 911 and his more recent works, Michael Moore in Trumpland and The Terms of Surrender, were openly partisan attacks against Republican Presidents George W. Bush and Donald Trump.

The unorthodox left-wing[45] author Christopher Hitchens wrote in Slate that “Fahrenheit 9/11 is a sinister exercise in moral frivolity, crudely disguised as an exercise in seriousness. It is also a spectacle of abject political cowardice masking itself as a demonstration of “dissenting” bravery.” Hitchens’s criticism was based on the fact that the film was based on a big lie and a big misrepresentation and sustained only by a dizzying succession of smaller falsehoods.[46]

The left-leaning fact-checking group Politifact has found that eight of those claims made in Moore’s movies were mostly or completely untrue.[47] For instance, Politifact twice found that Moore had overstated the popularity of socialism or socialist healthcare policies.[48]

Political Activism

Widely known as a liberal activist,[49] Moore has advocated left-wing positions on a wide array of hot-button political issues and often uses his celebrity to support these left-wing prerogatives.

In 2002, when Bowling for Columbine won the Academy Award for best documentary, Moore was widely criticized for using his award acceptance speech to lambast President George W. Bush as a “fictitious president.”[50]

Moore used an appearance on Larry King Live to criticize both then-Senator Obama and then-Senator Clinton’s healthcare plans for failing to propose universal government-run healthcare, and he proclaimed that health care was a “human right.”[51] On another occasion, Moore called for a single-payer national health insurance plan, under which the government would control and pay for from tax revenues all healthcare expenditure.[52]

In 2004, Moore called for a substantial tax increases.[53] He also said that he believes that the government should prevent companies from making fair profits and that corporations should have to pay “reparations” if they move operations overseas. [54]

In 2015, Moore accused police of practicing racial discrimination against African Americans, called for the release of all people jailed on drug sentences, and said that police should be disarmed.[55]

Since the 2016 election, Moore has consistently opposed President Trump. In January 2017, he joined the #DisruptJ20 movement which protested President Trump’s inauguration in Washington, D.C.[56] Moore and Trump argued on Twitter about Moore’s anti-Trump Broadway show: President Trump tweeted, “While not at all presidential I must point out that the Sloppy Michael Moore Show on Broadway was a TOTAL BOMB and was forced to close. Sad!”[57]

In 2017, Moore launched a one-man Broadway show opposing President Trump; after one performance, Moore loaded the attendees (including liberal Hollywood actors Mark Ruffalo and Olivia Wilde) onto buses headed for a demonstration at Trump Tower.[58] [59]

Democratic Party Donations

Moore is a regular donor to the Democratic Party and Democratic political candidates. In the 2016 presidential election, he supported the self-described “democratic socialist” U.S. Senator Bernie Sanders (I-Vermont) in the Democratic Party primaries over Hillary Clinton. Moore claimed that he first endorsed Bernie Sanders for public office in 1990 and had been a supporter of his ever since.[60]

Similarly, in 2008, he endorsed then-Senator Barack Obama and again blasted Hillary Clinton because she voted for the War in Iraq.[61] In 2004, he supported anti-Iraq War retired Gen. Wesley Clark over John Kerry in the Democratic primary and was noted to have “almost exclusively favored third-party candidates in the past.” [62]

Since 2006, Moore has given $42,600 in large-dollar contributions exclusively to Democratic candidates and committees. His contribution history includes $5,000 to the Michigan Democratic State Party, over $6,000 to Gary Peters, $4,000 to Sheldon Whitehouse, and max-out contributions to Barack Obama for President, Joe Kennedy, Lon Johnson, Melissa Gilbert, and controversial Senator Robert Menendez.[63]

Controversies

Michael Moore has a long history of making noxious political statements that have been widely criticized. In 2015, Moore was widely criticized when, in response to the unexpectedly popular Clint Eastwood movie American Sniper, Moore tweeted that snipers were cowards who “shoot u [sic] in the back.”[64]

Moore has also previously said that the McDonald’s two blocks from Ground Zero killed more people than the 9/11 hijackers, called for the arming of Palestinians to allow them to attack Israel, and claimed that “the factories of GM, Ford, and Chrysler produced some of the greatest weapons of mass destruction responsible for global warming and the melting of our polar icecaps.”[65]

References

  1. Labash, Matt. “Michael Moore, One-Trick Phony.” The Weekely Standard. June 8, 1998. Accessed December 26, 2017. http://www.weeklystandard.com/michael-moore-one-trick-phony/article/5507
  2. Labash, Matt. “Michael Moore, One-Trick Phony.” The Weekly Standard. June 8, 1998. Accessed December 26, 2017. http://www.weeklystandard.com/michael-moore-one-trick-phony/article/5507
  3. “Directors: Michael Moore.” Box Office Mojo. Updated October 19, 2016. Accessed December 26, 2017.  http://www.boxofficemojo.com/people/chart/?view=Director&id=michaelmoore.htm
  4. Strauss, Gary. “The truth about Michael Moore.” USA Today. June 21, 2004. Accessed December 26, 2017. https://usatoday30.usatoday.com/life/movies/news/2004-06-20-moore_x.htm
  5. Donnelly, Francis. “Divorce case exposes bickering between filmmaker Michael Moore, wife.” Detroit News. July 22, 2014. Accessed December 26, 2017. https://web.archive.org/web/20140722085208/http://www.detroitnews.com/article/20140722/METRO06/307220028
  6. Daley, David. “The Awful Truth About Michael Moore.” Hartford Daily Courant. April 15, 1999. Accessed December 26, 2017. http://articles.courant.com/1999-04-15/entertainment/9904150726_1_tv-nation-downsizing-michael-moore
  7. Donnelly, Francis. “Divorce case exposes bickering between filmmaker Michael Moore, wife.” Detroit News. July 22, 2014. Accessed December 26, 2017. https://web.archive.org/web/20140722085208/http://www.detroitnews.com/article/20140722/METRO06/307220028
  8. Labash, Matt. “Michael Moore, One-Trick Phony.” The Weekely Standard. June 8, 1998. Accessed December 26, 2017. http://www.weeklystandard.com/michael-moore-one-trick-phony/article/5507
  9. Labash, Matt. “Michael Moore, One-Trick Phony.” The Weekely Standard. June 8, 1998. Accessed December 26, 2017. http://www.weeklystandard.com/michael-moore-one-trick-phony/article/5507
  10. Baker, Sarah and Escherich, Katie. “Michael Moore’s Latest Target: An ‘Immoral’ Health Care System.” ABC News. June 13, 2007. Accessed December 26, 2017.  http://abcnews.go.com/Nightline/story?id=3274963
  11. Corn, David. “Moore: If There’s No Revolution, I Quit.” Mother Jones. October 1, 2009. Accessed December 26, 2017.  http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2009/10/michael-moore-capitalism-a-love-story/
  12. “’Bowling for Columbine’ – It’s Not About Guns.” Newsmax. November 7, 2002. Accessed December 26, 2017. https://www.newsmax.com/pre-2008/-bowling-for-columbineit-s/2002/11/07/id/668579/
  13. Labash, Matt. “Michael Moore, One-Trick Phony.” The Weekely Standard. June 8, 1998. Accessed December 26, 2017. http://www.weeklystandard.com/michael-moore-one-trick-phony/article/5507
  14. MacFarquhar, Larissa. “The Populist.” The New Yorker. February 16, 2004. Accessed December 26, 2017. https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2004/02/16/the-populist
  15. Michael Moore IMDB Page. The IMDB.com website. Accessed December 26, 2017. http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0601619/
  16. Garner, Dwight. “Filmmaker Michael Moore’s early life.” The Seattle Times. September 18, 2011. Accessed December 26, 2017. https://www.seattletimes.com/entertainment/books/filmmaker-michael-moores-early-life/
  17. Jones, Alex. “Radical Magazine Removes Editor, Setting Off A Widening Political Debate.” The New York Times. September 27, 1986. Accessed December 26, 2017. http://www.nytimes.com/1986/09/27/us/radical-magazine-removes-editor-setting-off-a-widening-political-debate.html
  18. Jones, Alex. “Radical Magazine Removes Editor, Setting Off A Widening Political Debate.” The New York Times. September 27, 1986. Accessed December 26, 2017. http://www.nytimes.com/1986/09/27/us/radical-magazine-removes-editor-setting-off-a-widening-political-debate.html
  19. Labash, Matt. “Michael Moore, One-Trick Phony.” The Weekly Standard. June 8, 1998. Accessed December 26, 2017. http://www.weeklystandard.com/michael-moore-one-trick-phony/article/5507
  20. Labash, Matt. “Michael Moore, One-Trick Phony.” The Weekely Standard. June 8, 1998. Accessed December 26, 2017. http://www.weeklystandard.com/michael-moore-one-trick-phony/article/5507
  21. Donnelly, Francis. “Divorce case exposes bickering between filmmaker Michael Moore, wife.” Detroit News. July 22, 2014. Accessed December 26, 2017. https://web.archive.org/web/20140722085208/http://www.detroitnews.com/article/20140722/METRO06/307220028
  22. Daley, David. “The Awful Truth About Michael Moore.” Hartford Daily Courant. April 15, 1999. Accessed December 26, 2017. http://articles.courant.com/1999-04-15/entertainment/9904150726_1_tv-nation-downsizing-michael-moore
  23. Labash, Matt. “Michael Moore, One-Trick Phony.” The Weekely Standard. June 8, 1998. Accessed December 26, 2017. http://www.weeklystandard.com/michael-moore-one-trick-phony/article/5507
  24. Michael Moore Youtube Page. “Michael Moore on CNN’s Piers Morgan Tonight, Part 1.” CNN. Piers Morgan. October 25, 2011. Accessed December 26, 2017. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MB2_0G8CKDY
  25. “Michael Moore Refuses to Answer Questions Regarding His $50 Million Net Worth at Occupy Portland.” Youtube.com website. October 31, 2011. Accessed December 26, 2017. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XwLduh4gXtw
  26. Labash, Matt. “Michael Moore, One-Trick Phony.” The Weekely Standard. June 8, 1998. Accessed December 26, 2017. http://www.weeklystandard.com/michael-moore-one-trick-phony/article/5507
  27. Labash, Matt. “Michael Moore, One-Trick Phony.” The Weekely Standard. June 8, 1998. Accessed December 26, 2017. http://www.weeklystandard.com/michael-moore-one-trick-phony/article/5507
  28. MacFarquhar, Larissa. “The Populist.” The New Yorker. February 16, 2004. Accessed December 26, 2017. https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2004/02/16/the-populist
  29. Taylor, Jenn. “Meltdown hilarity: Michael Moore calls for ‘revolt’ against Mich. GOP ‘political serial killers.” Twitchy.com website. December 7, 2012. Accessed December 26, 2017.  https://twitchy.com/jennqpublic-3135/2012/12/07/meltdown-hilarity-michael-moore-calls-for-revolt-against-mich-gop-political-serial-killers/
  30. Michael Moore Twitter Post. Twitter.com website. December 7, 2012. 11:05 A.M. Accessed December 26, 2017.  https://twitter.com/mmflint/status/277081436157251585
  31. Richmond, Todd. “Michael Moore rallies Wis. pro-union protesters.” Yahoo News. March 6, 2011. Archived March 7, 2011. Accessed December 26, 2017. https://web.archive.org/web/20110307065844/http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/us_wisconsin_budget_unions_protest
  32. Labash, Matt. “Michael Moore, One-Trick Phony.” The Weekely Standard. June 8, 1998. Accessed December 26, 2017. http://www.weeklystandard.com/michael-moore-one-trick-phony/article/5507
  33. Radosh, Daniel. “Media Circus – Moore is less.” Salon. June 6, 1997. Accessed December 26, 2017. https://www.salon.com/1997/06/06/media_70/
  34. Salon Staff. “Michael Moore fires back at Salon.” Salon. July 4, 1997. Accessed December 26, 2017. https://www.salon.com/1997/07/04/moore970703/
  35. Salon Staff. “Michael Moore fires back at Salon.” Salon. July 4, 1997. Accessed December 26, 2017. https://www.salon.com/1997/07/04/moore970703/
  36. MacFarquhar, Larissa. “The Populist.” The New Yorker. February 16, 2004. Accessed December 26, 2017. https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2004/02/16/the-populist
  37. “Directors: Michael Moore.” Box Office Mojo. Updated October 19, 2016. Accessed December 26, 2017.  http://www.boxofficemojo.com/people/chart/?view=Director&id=michaelmoore.htm
  38. Wicklund, Joel. “Michael Moore’s Anti-Hero Act Gets Old In ‘Where To Invade Next.’” Chicagoist.com website. February 12, 2016. Accessed December 26, 2017. http://chicagoist.com/2016/02/12/michael_moores_act_gets_old_in_wher.php
  39. Strauss, Gary. “The truth about Michael Moore.” USA Today. June 21, 2004. Accessed December 26, 2017. https://usatoday30.usatoday.com/life/movies/news/2004-06-20-moore_x.htm
  40. Strauss, Gary. “The truth about Michael Moore.” USA Today. June 21, 2004. Accessed December 26, 2017. https://usatoday30.usatoday.com/life/movies/news/2004-06-20-moore_x.htm
  41. Corn, David. “Moore: If There’s No Revolution, I Quit.” Mother Jones. October 1, 2009. Accessed December 26, 2017.  http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2009/10/michael-moore-capitalism-a-love-story/
  42. Accessed December 26, 2017. https://www.forbes.com/2009/09/22/michael-moore-capitalism-new-york-film-festival-opinions-columnists-elisabeth-eaves.html#61a5484b2ebe
  43. Baker, Sarah and Escherich, Katie. “Michael Moore’s Latest Target: An ‘Immoral’ Health Care System.” ABC News. June 13, 2007. Accessed December 26, 2017.  http://abcnews.go.com/Nightline/story?id=3274963
  44. “’Bowling for Columbine’ – It’s Not About Guns.” Newsmax. November 7, 2002. Accessed December 26, 2017. https://www.newsmax.com/pre-2008/-bowling-for-columbineit-s/2002/11/07/id/668579/
  45. Paxman, Jeremy. “Paxman meets Hitchens”. BBC Newsnight. BBC Two. August 10, 2010. Accessed December 26, 2017. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Y-s9AyNQyCw
  46. Hitchens, Christopher. “Unfairenheit 9/11.” Slate Magazine. June 21, 2004. Accessed December 26, 2017. http://www.slate.com/articles/news_and_politics/fighting_words/2004/06/unfairenheit_911.html
  47. “Michael Moore’s file.” Politifact. Undated. Accessed December 26, 2017. http://www.politifact.com/personalities/michael-moore/
  48. “All False statements involving Michael Moore.” Politifact. Undated. Accessed December 26, 2017. http://www.politifact.com/personalities/michael-moore/statements/byruling/false/
  49. Easley, Jonathan. “Michael Moore: Dems have ‘no message, no plan, no leaders.’” The Hill. June 21, 2017. Accessed December 26, 2017. http://thehill.com/homenews/house/338811-michael-moore-dems-have-no-message-no-plan-no-leaders
  50. Strauss, Gary. “The truth about Michael Moore.” USA Today. June 21, 2004. Accessed December 26, 2017. https://usatoday30.usatoday.com/life/movies/news/2004-06-20-moore_x.htm
  51. “Michael Moore on The 2008 Election.” CNN. Larry King Live. April 30, 2008. Accessed December 26, 2017. http://transcripts.cnn.com/TRANSCRIPTS/0804/30/lkl.01.html
  52. Knight Jr., Richard. “To Your Health: A Talk with Sicko’s Michael Moore.” June 27, 2007. Accessed December 26, 2017. http://www.windycitymediagroup.com/gay/lesbian/news/ARTICLE.php?AID=15370
  53. MacFarquhar, Larissa. “The Populist.” The New Yorker. February 16, 2004. Accessed December 26, 2017. https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2004/02/16/the-populist
  54. MacFarquhar, Larissa. “The Populist.” The New Yorker. February 16, 2004. Accessed December 26, 2017. https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2004/02/16/the-populist
  55. Hensch, Mark. “Michael Moore: Disarm the police.” The Hill. April 30, 2015. Accessed December 26, 2017. http://thehill.com/blogs/blog-briefing-room/news/240634-michael-moore-disarm-the-police
  56. Chasmar, Jessica. “Left-wing filmmaker Michael Moore: ‘The Democrats lost because of the Democrats.’” The Washington Times. January 17, 2017. Accessed December 26, 2017. https://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2017/jan/17/left-wing-filmaker-michael-moore-the-democrats-los/
  57. Cox, Gordon. “Trump, Michael Moore Start Twitter War Over Broadway Show.” Variety. October 28, 2017. Accessed December 26, 2017.  http://variety.com/2017/legit/news/trump-michael-moore-tweets-1202601819/
  58. Schwab, Nicki. “Far-left filmmaker Michael Moore says Trump is on track to win again in 2020 and not even he can stop him.” August 28, 2017. Accessed December 26, 2017. http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4830714/Michael-Moore-says-Trump-track-win-2020.html
  59. Reed, Ryan. “Michael Moore, Mark Ruffalo Take Broadway Crowd to Protest Donald Trump.” The Rolling Stone Magazine. August 16, 2017. Accessed December 26, 2017. https://www.rollingstone.com/politics/news/watch-michael-moore-mark-ruffalo-protest-outside-trump-tower-w498027
  60. Moore, Michael. “My endorsement.” MichaelMoore.com website. Undated. Accessed December 26, 2017. https://michaelmoore.com/MyEndorsementOfBernie/
  61. “Michael Moore on The 2008 Election.” CNN. Larry King Live. April 30, 2008. Accessed December 26, 2017. http://transcripts.cnn.com/TRANSCRIPTS/0804/30/lkl.01.html
  62. Strauss, Gary. “The truth about Michael Moore.” USA Today. June 21, 2004. Accessed December 26, 2017. https://usatoday30.usatoday.com/life/movies/news/2004-06-20-moore_x.htm
  63. Individual Contribution Data: Michael Moore. Federal Election Commission. 2006-2017. Accessed December 26, 2017.
  64. Quoted in Meyers, Jim. “12 Disgusting Michael Moore Quotes, What a Creep!” Newsmax. January 21, 2015. Accessed December 26, 2017. https://www.newsmax.com/TheWire/michael-moore-disgusting-quotes-creep/2015/01/21/id/619779/
  65. Quoted in Meyers, Jim. “12 Disgusting Michael Moore Quotes, What a Creep!” Newsmax. January 21, 2015. Accessed December 26, 2017. https://www.newsmax.com/TheWire/michael-moore-disgusting-quotes-creep/2015/01/21/id/619779/
  See an error? Let us know!