Non-profit

Texas Education Grantmakers Advocacy Consortium

Website:

tegac.org

Location:

Austin, TX

Formation:

2012

Type:

Grantmaking Organization

President/CEO:

Jennifer Esterline

The Texas Education Grantmakers Advocacy Consortium (TEGAC) is a grant-making organization comprised of 50 foundations involved in supporting advocacy for increased taxpayer funding for public education in Texas. [1] Its strategies include lobbying for more taxes, conducting research to determine best practices in education, and determining where the greatest needs in funding exist. [2] TEGAC’s studies frequently conclude that more revenues from the Texas state government are needed[3] to make up for budget cuts,[4] and to help the non-English speaking students whose numbers have dramatically increased in Texas in recent decades. [5]

TEGAC partners with the left-leaning Center for Public Policy Priorities [6] [7] to produce research supporting increased taxpayer spending for education and for a 2020 Census program. [8]

Background

Texas Education Grantmakers Advocacy Consortium was created in 2012 due governmental spending cuts for Texas public education. It consists of a fluctuating number of organizations that seek to improve education. The avenues used are typically producing research that supports additional taxpayer spending,[9] then educating and lobbying politicians with the studies to influence an increase of the state budget. [10] In 2019, TEGAC merged with Educate Texas. [11]

Members of the Consortium include the prominent Texas-based left-of-center grantmakers Leland Fikes Foundation, Harold Simmons Foundation, and Houston Endowment. [12]

Center for Public Policy Priorities

TEGAC partners with the left-of-center Center for Public Policy Priorities and to produce analysis supporting improved student outcomes by increasing funding. One study[13] defends “recapture,” of revenues from wealthier school districts for districts with fewer assets. The study asserts that the redistribution of tax dollars makes funding of schools more equitable. It further blames the Texas government for negatively impacting high need districts through insufficient funding. [14]

The partnership has also aligned to create the 2020 Texas Counts Campaign to support and encourage left-leaning demographics’ participation in the 2020 U.S. Census. [15]

References

  1. Texas Education Grantmakers Advocacy Consortium, March 9, 2018. http://tegac.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/News-Release-Public-Ed-Polling-2018-03-19-FINAL-1.pdf.

    ^

  2. Texas Education Grantmakers Advocacy Consortium (TEGAC), March 19, 2018. http://tegac.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/News-Release-Public-Ed-Polling-2018-03-19-FINAL-1.pdf. ^
  3. Wallace, Jeremy. “What’s Happening in the Texas Legislature on Wednesday, Jan. 23.” Houston Chronicle. Houston Chronicle, January 22, 2019. https://www.chron.com/news/article/What-s-happening-in-the-Texas-Legislature-on-13553374.php. ^
  4. “Money Matters – TEGAC: Texas Education Grantmakers Advocacy Consortium.” TEGAC. The Center for Public Policy Priorities , 2018. https://tegac.org/tx-school-finance-facts/money-matters/. ^
  5. “Bilingual Education – TEGAC: Texas Education Grantmakers Advocacy Consortium.” TEGAC. The Center for Public Policy Priorities , 2018. https://tegac.org/tx-school-finance-facts/bilingual-education/. ^
  6. The Center for Public Policy Priorities , 2018. https://www.forabettertexas.org/images/2018_EO_GetSchooled_TeacherSalaries.pdf. ^
  7. Samuels, Alex, and Texas Tribune. “Texas Voters Approve State Income Tax Ban, Most Other Constitutional Amendments.” Houston Public Media, November 7, 2019. https://www.houstonpublicmedia.org/articles/news/politics/2019/11/05/350996/proposal-to-effectively-ban-a-state-income-tax-among-several-constitutional-amendments-with-strong-support-in-early-voting/. ^
  8. “2020 Census.” 2020 Census – Communities Foundation of Texas. Communities Foundation of Texas. Accessed January 16, 2020. https://www.cftexas.org/community-impact/integrations/2020-texas-counts-campaign. ^
  9. Texas Education Grantmakers Advocacy Consortium (TEGAC), March 19, 2018. http://tegac.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/03/News-Release-Public-Ed-Polling-2018-03-19-FINAL-1.pdf. ^
  10. Sabin, Caroline, and Janet Harman. “Sabin, Harman: Texas Can No Longer Rely on Local Property Taxes to Fund Schools.” HoustonChronicle.com. Houston Chronicle, February 12, 2017. https://www.houstonchronicle.com/opinion/outlook/article/Sabin-Harman-Texas-can-no-longer-rely-on-local-10927268.php. ^
  11. “Educate Texas and Texas Education Grantmakers Advocacy Consortium (TEGAC) .” Educate Texas – Texas Education Grantmakers Advocacy Consortium. Educate Texas. Accessed January 16, 2020. https://www.edtx.org/our-work/policy-and-advocacy/texas-education-grantmakers-advocacy-consortium. ^
  12. “Members – TEGAC: Texas Education Grantmakers Advocacy Consortium.” TEGAC. Accessed January 17, 2020. https://tegac.org/about-us-2/members/. ^
  13. “2017 Policy Priorities – TEGAC: Texas Education Grantmakers Advocacy Consortium.” TEGAC. TEGAC, 2017. https://tegac.org/policy-priorities/2017-policy-priorities/. ^
  14. “Consortium’s Research and Policy Recommendations 2017.” TEGAC, 2017. http://tegac.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/06/TEGAC-School-Finance-Talking-Points-FINAL.pdf. ^
  15. “2020 Census.” 2020 Census – Communities Foundation of Texas. Accessed January 16, 2020. https://www.cftexas.org/community-impact/integrations/2020-texas-counts-campaign. ^
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Texas Education Grantmakers Advocacy Consortium


Austin, TX