Non-profit

National Association of Assistant United States Attorneys (NAAUSA)

Website:

www.naausa.org/site/

Location:

WOODBRIDGE, VA

Tax ID:

54-1668606

Tax-Exempt Status:

501(c)(6)

Budget (2017):

Revenue: $168,439
Expenses: $168,352
Assets: $16,713

The National Association of Assistant United States Attorneys (NAAUSA) is a membership organization that represents the interests of assistant U.S. attorneys, the career federal prosecutors. The NAAUSA is notable for its opposition to proposed criminal justice reform legislation, especially attempts to curb the use of the controversial practice of civil asset forfeiture.

Overview

The National Association of Assistant United States Attorneys is a membership organization of assistant U.S. attorneys — career federal prosecutors who work under a Presidentially appointed United States Attorney trying cases and representing the government in criminal justice and civil trials. NAAUSA lobbies for higher pay, better working conditions, and against criminal justice reform legislation. [1]

The group claims roughly 1,500 members. [2]

Leadership

The leadership of the NAAUSA is made up of currently serving Assistant United States Attorneys. Larry Leiser works as the organization’s president. Steven Wasserman is the vice president for policy. Adam Hanna serves as the vice president for operations/membership. Marc Wallenstein is the treasurer. David Marye is the secretary. [3]

Robert Patterson works as NAAUSA’s the executive director. Jason Briefel serves as the counsel and Washington representative. [4]

History and Issues

In 1993, a group of assistant U.S. attorneys came together to form the NAAUSA. In 1994, the Department of Justice challenged the NAAUSA’s ability to discuss pay of AUSAs. The NAAUSA joined with other professional organizations to pass a law that clarified the ability of the NAAUSA to discuss pay. [5]

Most of the issues that the NAAUSA work on are issues related to pay and working conditions. The organization claims credit for improving the pay and professionalism of AUSAs. [6]

In 2014, the NAAUSA took credit for helping to defeat a proposal to weaken mandatory minimum sentences in the U.S. Senate. [7]

In 2017, the organization supported the decision of then-U.S. Attorney General Jeff Sessions to order federal prosecutors to seek the highest possible sentence. The group’s former president, Steven Cook also joined the Justice Department and worked under Sessions. [8]

In 2017, the group announced that it would develop a policy position on civil asset forfeiture. Opponents of the practice believe that it threatens property rights and serves as a revenue generating machine for law enforcement and other government agencies. NAAUSA defended the practice, with . NAAUSA president Larry Leiser saying, “We believe that asset forfeiture is a good and viable tool, but some changes need to be adjusted to make it fairer.” [9]

Funding

According to the 2017 Form 990, the group raised $142,133 from membership dues and $25,000 from program revenue. The organization spent $168,352. [10]

References

  1. “History”. 2020. National Association Of Assistant United States Attorneys. Accessed May 24. https://www.naausa.org/site/index.php/about-naausa/history. ^
  2. “History”. 2020. National Association Of Assistant United States Attorneys. Accessed May 24. https://www.naausa.org/site/index.php/about-naausa/history. ^
  3. “Directors & Delegates”. 2020. National Association Of Assistant United States Attorneys. Accessed May 24. https://www.naausa.org/site/index.php/about-naausa/directors. ^
  4. “Directors & Delegates”. 2020. National Association Of Assistant United States Attorneys. Accessed May 24. https://www.naausa.org/site/index.php/about-naausa/directors. ^
  5. “History”. 2020. National Association Of Assistant United States Attorneys. Accessed May 24. https://www.naausa.org/site/index.php/about-naausa/history. ^
  6. “Accomplishments”. 2020. National Association Of Assistant United States Attorneys. Accessed May 24. https://www.naausa.org/site/index.php/about-naausa/accomplishments. ^
  7. “Accomplishments”. 2020. National Association Of Assistant United States Attorneys. Accessed May 24. https://www.naausa.org/site/index.php/about-naausa/accomplishments. ^
  8. Ewing, Maura. 2017. “The Influential Prosecutors Backing Jeff Sessions On Mandatory Minimums”. The Atlantic. https://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2017/05/mandatory-minimums-sessions-naausa-sentencing/527619/. ^
  9. Ewing, Maura. 2017. “The Influential Prosecutors Backing Jeff Sessions On Mandatory Minimums”. The Atlantic. https://www.theatlantic.com/politics/archive/2017/05/mandatory-minimums-sessions-naausa-sentencing/527619/. ^
  10.         2017 Form 990. 2017. Ebook. https://pdf.guidestar.org/PDF_Images/2017/541/668/2017-541668606-1041fe66-ZO.pdf. ^
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Nonprofit Information

  • Accounting Period: December - November
  • Tax Exemption Received: August 1, 1993

  • Available Filings

    Period Form Type Total revenue Total functional expenses Total assets (EOY) Total liabilities (EOY) Unrelated business income? Total contributions Program service revenue Investment income Comp. of current officers, directors, etc. Form 990
    2017 Dec Form 990EZ $168,439 $168,352 $16,713 $22,323 $0 $0 $0 $0
    2015 Dec Form 990EZ $181,404 $186,493 $19,349 $27,167 $0 $0 $0 $0
    2014 Dec Form 990EZ $178,804 $187,393 $23,529 $26,258 $0 $0 $0 $0
    2013 Dec Form 990EZ $190,166 $193,102 $34,624 $28,764 $0 $0 $0 $0
    2012 Dec Form 990EZ $195,779 $199,331 $31,477 $22,681 $0 $0 $0 $0
    2011 Dec Form 990EZ $196,663 $170,807 $37,063 $24,715 $0 $0 $0 $0

    Additional Filings (PDFs)

    National Association of Assistant United States Attorneys (NAAUSA)

    5868 MAPLEDALE PLAZA NO 104
    WOODBRIDGE, VA 22193-4535