Non-profit

Crossroads Antiracism Organizing and Training

Website:

crossroadsantiracism.org/%20

Location:

Matterson, IL

Tax ID:

36-3986900

Tax-Exempt Status:

501(c)(3)

Budget (2019):

Revenue: $1,812,006
Expenses: $1,406,006
Assets: $900,378

Formation:

1986

Type:

Far-left Critical Race Theory Advocacy Organization

Executive Director:

Robette Ann Dias

Crossroads Antiracism Organizing and Training, formerly known as Crossroads Ministry, [1] is a far-left organization that hosts critical race theory-inspired workshops, training sessions, and webinars. [2] It operates critical race theory-inspired workshops for educators from the early childhood education to the university level in public, private, and parochial schools. [3]

The workshops encourage white people to acknowledge how they have allegedly “engaged in racist behavior” and claim that white people “benefit from institutional and systemic racism” that minorities “struggle with and die because of.” [4] Crossroads’ workshops are grounded in the premise that “US society has a cultural arrangement with intersecting systems of subordination.” [5]

Crossroads was founded by left-wing [6] Lutheran minister Joseph Barndt in 1986. [7] Barndt has produced “some of the most revolutionary anti-racism work of the day,” [8] is a “strong socialist and strong opponent of the capitalist system,” [9] and believes all white people in the U.S. are “automatically racist.” [10]

Robette Ann Dias is Crossroads’ executive director. [11] She has said that Crossroads teaches that “white supremacy is the ideological basis upon which the laws and culture of U.S. society have been built.” [12]

History and Leadership

Crossroads Antiracism Organizing and Training was founded as Crossroads Ministry in 1986 [13] by Lutheran pastor [14] Joseph Barndt and Susan Birkel to address perceived “structural racism” in institutions. [15]

The Chicago Reporter wrote that Barndt has produced “what some consider some of the most revolutionary anti-racism work of the day.” In the interview, Barndt characterized himself as a “strong socialist and strong opponent of the capitalist system.” [16]

Barndt has said “whites are trapped in the prison of racism,” [17] believes all white people in the U.S. are “automatically racist,” [18] that “no minority could ever be” racist, [19] and that “white supremacy has dominated U.S. society for more than 500 years.” [20]

He left Crossroads in 2004 to be a core organizer for the left-wing critical race theory-aligned People’s Institute for Survival and Beyond (PISAB). [21]

Robette Ann Dias is Crossroads’ executive director. [22] She has said Crossroads believes “white supremacy is the ideological basis upon which the laws and culture of U.S. society have been built.” [23] In her personal capacity, Dias has said the United States was originally constructed as an “apartheid country,” “policing developed in the milieu of white supremacy,” and securing the Mexican border has not been done to maintain American sovereignty but to “to intimidate immigrants to suppress wages for agricultural and other manual laborers.” [24]

Activities and Funding

Crossroads Antiracism Organizing and Training produces critical race theory-inspired workshops and “antiracism/equity and inclusion” consulting, organizes bias-based “strategic interventions,” and advises its clients how to “intervene most effectively to interrupt practices, policies, etc. that uphold white supremacy.” [25]

As a part of its programming, Crossroads produces “radically inclusive” power analysis that links colonialism and neocolonialism to the experience of each racial minority group in the United States, [26] produces 9 to 12 month-long “race equity audits” to build an “intersectional analysis of systemic oppression in the United States and its institutions, [27] and builds “antiracism teams” to guide “long-term transformation with a vision 20 to 30 years in the future.” [28]

The group uses a chart in its programming which categorizes either/or thinking, a “scarcity worldview,” distribution of information on a need-to-know basis, and individual achievement as “values shaping white institutions and creating discomfort and disfunction as a by-product of embedded oppression.” [29]

Crossroads has local chapters in Kalamazoo, Michigan; [30] Chicago, Illinois; [31] Springfield, Missouri; [32] and St. Louis, Missouri. [33] The group has worked with municipal governments, [34] K-12 schools and universities, [35] and left-of-center and liberal religious organizations including multiple synods of the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America, conferences of the United Methodist Church, the Archdiocese of Chicago, multiple dioceses of the Episcopal Church, Pax Christi USA, Call to Action, several communities of Women Religious, and the Unitarian Universalist Association. [36]

Critical Race Theory-Inspired Workshops

Crossroads operates critical race theory-inspired workshops for educators at all levels ranging from early childhood education to the university-level at public, private, and parochial schools. [37] These workshops organize a so-called “courageous space” where white people can acknowledge how they have supposedly “engaged in racist behavior.” The workshops claim that white people “benefit from institutional and systemic racism” that minorities struggle with and die because of. [38] One staffer is in charge of watching participants’ reactions to the discussions. [39]

These critical race theory-inspired workshops were developed with far-left educator and author [40] Louise Derman-Sparks, [41] who has said that President Donald Trump wanted to create a “white nationalist America.” [42] The National Association for the Education of Young Children identified the four goals of these critical race theory-inspired “anti-bias education workshops” as identity, diversity, justice, and activism. [43]

Crossroads offers three introductory-level critical race theory-inspired workshops: [44]

  • Introduction to Anti-bias/Antiracist Education (ABAR), which is designed for educators working with children and introduces teachers to the 4 Goals of Anti-Bias Education;
  • Critical Cultural Competency, which is grounded in the premise that “US society has a cultural arrangement with intersecting systems of subordination” based on race and class; and
  • Introduction to Systemic Racism, which is designed to teach stakeholders that racism is a “systemic, institutional problem of power which requires structural intervention to dismantle.” [45]

Crossroads also offers two critical race theory-inspired in-depth workshops: [46]

  • Understanding and Analyzing Systemic Racism, which talks about critical race theory-inspired institutions, analyzes racism, explores the belief that institutional racism exists in the United States, and aims to equip organizations to work towards “antiracist transformation of the organization” [47] and
  • Antiracism Pedagogy across Curriculum (ARPAC), which is still in development as of early October 2021. [48]

Crossroads also operates a critical race theory-inspired webinar series tailored to religious groups like the Presbytery of San Francisco. Questions and topics of discussion in this webinar included: [49]

  • What is systemic racism?
  • What is white supremacy and what are its values?
  • How does the church uphold white dominant values that undermine social justice?
  • Why must Christians be equipped to speak against white supremacy?
  • What is antiracism and what does it require of Christians? and
  • Why must Christians invest in the cultivation of values that challenge white supremacy? [50]

Funding

As of 2019, Crossroads Antiracism Organizing and Training receives all its revenue from program services. Crossroads reported annual revenue worth $1,812,006, [51] in 2019; $1,364,011 in 2018; [52] and $1,074,423 in 2017. [53]

References

  1. “About CROAR.” Columbia College Chicago. Accessed October 6, 2021. https://about.colum.edu/artt/about-croar. ^
  2. “In-Person Workshops.” Crossroads Anti-Racism Organization and Training. Accessed October 7, 2021. https://crossroadsantiracism.org/introductory-in-person-workshops/. ^
  3. “Anti-Bias, AntiRacist (ABAR) Education.” Crossroads Antiracism Organizing and Training.” June 27, 2020. Accessed via Web Archive. October 6, 2021. https://web.archive.org/web/20200627060710/http://crossroadsantiracism.org/training/antibias_antiracism. ^
  4. Hawk, Sheilah. “My Experience attending the Crossroads Anti-Racism Workshop.” March 5, 2021. Accessed October 6, 2021. https://acpe.edu/detail-pages/news/2021/03/05/my-experience-attending-the-crossroads-anti-racism-workshop. ^
  5. “In-Person Workshops.” Crossroads Antiracism Organization and Training. Accessed October 7, 2021. https://crossroadsantiracism.org/introductory-in-person-workshops/. ^
  6. “Introduction to Website and Blogpage Themes.” Joseph Bardnt’s Website. Accessed October 7, 2021. https://josephbarndtwebsite.com/index.php. ^
  7. “About Crossroads Antiracism Organization and Training.” Crossroads Antiracism Organization and Training. July 28, 2020. Accessed Via Web Archive. October 6, 2021. https://web.archive.org/web/20200728020825/http://crossroadsantiracism.org/about-us/. ^
  8. Miller, Matt. “Fighting an Invisible Enemy.” Chicago Reporter. May 21, 2008. Accessed October 6, 2021. https://www.chicagoreporter.com/fighting-invisible-enemy/. ^
  9. Miller, Matt. “Fighting an Invisible Enemy.” Chicago Reporter. May 21, 2008. Accessed October 6, 2021. https://www.chicagoreporter.com/fighting-invisible-enemy/. ^
  10. Miller, Matt. “Fighting an Invisible Enemy.” Chicago Reporter. May 21, 2008. Accessed October 6, 2021. https://www.chicagoreporter.com/fighting-invisible-enemy/. ^
  11. “Robette Ann Dias.” Crossroads Antiracism Organization and Training. Accessed October 6, 2021. https://crossroadsantiracism.org/staff/robette-ann-dias/. ^
  12. Dias, Robette Ann. “Racism Creates Barriers to Effective Community Policing.” Southern Illinois Law Journal. Spring 2016. Accessed October 6, 2021. https://law.siu.edu/_common/documents/law-journal/articles-2016/spring-2016/13%20-%20Dias%20Article%20-%20sm.pdf. ^
  13. “About Crossroads Antiracism Organization and Training.” Crossroads Antiracism Organization and Training. July 28, 2020. Accessed Via Web Archive. October 6, 2021. https://web.archive.org/web/20200728020825/http://crossroadsantiracism.org/about-us/. ^
  14. Miller, Matt. “Fighting an Invisible Enemy.” Chicago Reporter. May 21, 2008. Accessed October 6, 2021. https://www.chicagoreporter.com/fighting-invisible-enemy/. ^
  15.  “About Crossroads Antiracism Organization and Training.” Crossroads Antiracism Organization and Training. July 28, 2020. Accessed Via Web Archive. October 6, 2021. https://web.archive.org/web/20200728020825/http://crossroadsantiracism.org/about-us/. ^
  16.  Miller, Matt. “Fighting an Invisible Enemy.” Chicago Reporter. May 21, 2008. Accessed October 6, 2021. https://www.chicagoreporter.com/fighting-invisible-enemy/. ^
  17. Miller, Matt. “Fighting an Invisible Enemy.” Chicago Reporter. May 21, 2008. Accessed October 6, 2021. https://www.chicagoreporter.com/fighting-invisible-enemy/. ^
  18. Miller, Matt. “Fighting an Invisible Enemy.” Chicago Reporter. May 21, 2008. Accessed October 6, 2021. https://www.chicagoreporter.com/fighting-invisible-enemy/. ^
  19. Miller, Matt. “Fighting an Invisible Enemy.” Chicago Reporter. May 21, 2008. Accessed October 6, 2021. https://www.chicagoreporter.com/fighting-invisible-enemy/. ^
  20. Barndt, Joseph. “Introduction to Blogpage B – “Race, Racism and Anti-Racism.” Joseph Bardnt Website. Accessed October 7, 2021. https://josephbarndtwebsite.com/index.php/blogpage-b-race-racism-and-anti-racism. ^
  21. “Introduction to Website and Blog Themes.” Joseph Barndt’s Website. Accessed October 6, 2021. https://josephbarndtwebsite.com/index.php. ^
  22. “Robette Ann Dias.” Crossroads Antiracism Organization and Training. Accessed October 6, 2021. https://crossroadsantiracism.org/staff/robette-ann-dias/. ^
  23. Dias, Robette Ann. “Racism Creates Barriers to Effective Community Policing.” Southern Illinois Law Journal. Spring 2016. Accessed October 6, 2021. https://law.siu.edu/_common/documents/law-journal/articles-2016/spring-2016/13%20-%20Dias%20Article%20-%20sm.pdf. ^
  24. [1] Dias, Robette Ann. “Racism Creates Barriers to Effective Community Policing.” Southern Illinois Law Journal. Spring 2016. Accessed October 6, 2021. https://law.siu.edu/_common/documents/law-journal/articles-2016/spring-2016/13%20-%20Dias%20Article%20-%20sm.pdf ^
  25. “Consulting.” Crossroads Antiracism Organizing and Training. Accessed October 6, 2021. https://crossroadsantiracism.org/consulting/. ^
  26. Dias, Robette Ann. “Racism Creates Barriers to Effective Community Policing.” Southern Illinois Law Journal. Spring 2016. Accessed October 6, 2021. https://law.siu.edu/_common/documents/law-journal/articles-2016/spring-2016/13%20-%20Dias%20Article%20-%20sm.pdf. ^
  27. “Race Equity Audit.” Crossroads Antiracism Organizing and Training. Accessed October 6, 2021. https://crossroadsantiracism.org/audits/. ^
  28. “Antiracism Teams.” Crossroads Antiracism Organizing And Training.” June 17, 2020. Accessed via Web Archive. October 6, 2021. https://web.archive.org/web/20200627060626/http://crossroadsantiracism.org/training/trainingantiracism-teams/. ^
  29. Dias, Robette Ann. “Transforming Institutional Values: Revisited.” Crossroads Anti-Racism Organizing and Training. May 2008. Accessed October 6, 2021. https://marypendergreene.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/01/AntiRacistTransformingValues.pdf. ^
  30. “Kalamazoo, MI.” Crossroads Anti-Racism Organizing and Training. Accessed October 7, 2021. https://crossroadsantiracism.org/kalamazoo/. ^
  31. “Chicago Regional Organizing for Antiracism.” Crossroads Anti-Racism Organization and Training. October 7, 2021. https://crossroadsantiracism.org/chicago/. ^
  32. “Springfield Coalition on Dismantling Racism.” Crossroads Anti-Racism Organizing and Training. October 7, 2021. https://crossroadsantiracism.org/springfield/. ^
  33. “St. Louis.” Crossroads Antiracism Organizing and Training. Accessed October 7, 2021. https://crossroadsantiracism.org/stl/. ^
  34. “Antiracism Teams.” Crossroads Antiracism Organizing And Training.” June 17, 2020. Accessed via Web Archive. October 6, 2021. https://web.archive.org/web/20200627060626/http://crossroadsantiracism.org/training/trainingantiracism-teams/. ^
  35. “About Crossroads Antiracism Organization and Training.” Crossroads Antiracism Organization and Training. July 28, 2020. Accessed Via Web Archive. October 6, 2021. https://web.archive.org/web/20200728020825/http://crossroadsantiracism.org/about-us/. ^
  36. “About Crossroads Antiracism Organization and Training.” Crossroads Antiracism Organization and Training. July 28, 2020. Accessed Via Web Archive. October 6, 2021. https://web.archive.org/web/20200728020825/http://crossroadsantiracism.org/about-us/. ^
  37. “Anti-Bias, AntiRacist (ABAR) Education.” Crossroads Antiracism Organizing and Training.” June 27, 2020. Accessed via Web Archive. October 6, 2021. https://web.archive.org/web/20200627060710/http://crossroadsantiracism.org/training/antibias_antiracism. ^
  38. Hawk, Sheilah. “My Experience attending the Crossroads Anti-Racism Workshop.” March 5, 2021. Accessed October 6, 2021. https://acpe.edu/detail-pages/news/2021/03/05/my-experience-attending-the-crossroads-anti-racism-workshop. ^
  39. Judkis, Maura. “Anti-racism trainers were ready for this moment. Is everyone else?” Washington Post. July 8, 2020. Accessed via Web Archive. October 6, 2021. https://web.archive.org/web/20210221142455/https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/style/anti-racism-trainers-were-ready-for-this-moment-is-everyone-else/2020/07/07/df2d39ea-b582-11ea-a510-55bf26485c93_story.html. ^
  40. List of Louise Derman-Sparks publications for sale on Amazon. Accessed October 7, 2021. https://www.amazon.com/Books-Louise-Derman-Sparks/s?rh=n%3A283155%2Cp_27%3ALouise+Derman-Sparks. ^
  41. “Louise Derman-Sparks.” Anti-Bias Leaders in Early Childhood Education. Accessed October 7, 2021. https://www.antibiasleadersece.com/louise-derman-sparks/. ^
  42. [1] “Derman-Sparks, Louise. “Louise Derman-Sparks Responds to Scholastic.” Teaching for Change. Accessed October 7, 2021. https://www.teachingforchange.org/louise-derman-sparks-responds-to-scholastic. ^
  43. “Understanding Anti-Bias Education: Bringing the Four Core Goals to Every Facet of Your Curriculum.” National Association of Education of Young Children. Accessed October 7, 2021. https://www.naeyc.org/resources/pubs/yc/nov2019/understanding-anti-bias. ^
  44. “In-Person Workshops.” Crossroads Anti-Racism Organization and Training. Accessed October 7, 2021. https://crossroadsantiracism.org/introductory-in-person-workshops/. ^
  45. “In-Person Workshops.” Crossroads Antiracism Organization and Training. Accessed October 7, 2021. https://crossroadsantiracism.org/introductory-in-person-workshops/. ^
  46. “In-Person Workshops.” Crossroads Antiracism Organization and Training. Accessed October 7, 2021. https://crossroadsantiracism.org/introductory-in-person-workshops/. ^
  47. “In-Person Workshops.” Crossroads Antiracism Organization and Training. Accessed October 7, 2021. https://crossroadsantiracism.org/introductory-in-person-workshops/. ^
  48. “In-Person Workshops.” Crossroads Antiracism Organization and Training. Accessed October 7, 2021. https://crossroadsantiracism.org/introductory-in-person-workshops/. ^
  49. “Crossroads Antiracism Training.” Presbytery of San Francisco. Accessed October 6, 2021. https://www.presbyteryofsf.org/cross-roads/. ^
  50. “Crossroads Antiracism Training.” Presbytery of San Francisco. Accessed October 6, 2021. https://www.presbyteryofsf.org/cross-roads/. ^
  51.  “Crossroads Antiracism Organization & Training.” Return of Organization Exempt From Income Tax. (Form 990). 2019. Accessed October 6, 2021. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/display_990/363986900/04_2021_prefixes_36-37%2F363986900_201912_990_2021040517880426. ^
  52. [1] “Crossroads Antiracism Organization & Training.” Return of Organization Exempt From Income Tax (Form 990). 2018. Accessed October 7, 2021. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/display_990/363986900/01_2020_prefixes_36-38%2F363986900_201812_990_2020013117093025. ^
  53.  “Crossroads Antiracism Organization & Training.” Return of Organization Exempt From Income Tax (Form 990). 2018. Accessed October 7, 2021. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/display_990/363986900/01_2020_prefixes_36-38%2F363986900_201812_990_2020013117093025. ^
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Nonprofit Information

  • Accounting Period: December - November
  • Tax Exemption Received: August 1, 2000

  • Available Filings

    Period Form Type Total revenue Total functional expenses Total assets (EOY) Total liabilities (EOY) Unrelated business income? Total contributions Program service revenue Investment income Comp. of current officers, directors, etc. Form 990
    2019 Dec Form 990 $1,812,006 $1,406,006 $900,378 $114,497 N $0 $1,812,006 $0 $149,196 PDF
    2018 Dec Form 990 $1,364,011 $1,257,678 $443,080 $63,935 N $0 $1,364,011 $0 $134,641 PDF
    2017 Dec Form 990 $1,074,423 $969,342 $366,300 $81,163 N $0 $1,074,423 $0 $67,758 PDF
    2016 Dec Form 990 $726,111 $724,322 $210,589 $48,648 N $4,936 $721,154 $0 $111,096 PDF
    2015 Dec Form 990 $662,706 $610,054 $221,649 $61,977 N $13,223 $649,447 $0 $103,837 PDF
    2014 Dec Form 990 $604,071 $514,744 $0 $0 N $60,044 $543,985 $0 $96,579 PDF
    2013 Dec Form 990 $382,296 $426,653 $55,373 $55,007 N $15,865 $364,385 $0 $96,578 PDF
    2012 Dec Form 990 $459,046 $425,431 $106,264 $56,371 N $0 $459,046 $0 $202,372 PDF
    2011 Dec Form 990 $423,905 $477,546 $64,942 $78,266 N $45,782 $376,062 $0 $187,719 PDF
    2010 Dec Form 990 $496,120 $517,605 $100,637 $60,040 N $0 $496,120 $0 $130,029 PDF

    Additional Filings (PDFs)

    Crossroads Antiracism Organizing and Training

    P.O. Box 309
    Matterson, IL