Person

Philip Munger

Nationality:

American

Occupation:

Investor

Political Party:

Democratic

Lives:

New York City, New York

Philip Munger a left-of-center activist and the son of Charles Munger, the longtime business partner of liberal investor Warren Buffett. Munger is a major donor to the Democratic Party. [1]

Munger is a co-chair of the left-of-center advocacy group Future Majority and has made several six- and seven-figure donations to Democratic campaigns and organizations. [2] These donations include $105,600 to the Biden Victory Fund, the PAC which supported President Joe Biden’s election in 2020; $1,000,000 and $850,000 to the liberal Priorities USA Action in 2016; and $416,100 and $353,400 to former U.S. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign in 2016. [3]

In 2015, Munger was the Virginia Democratic Party’s single largest donor,[4] giving $1,000,000 of the total $1,700,000 in direct donations that the Virginia Democratic Party received for state races. [5] That same year, Munger made a $35,000 donation to Democratic Party politician and activist Stacey Abrams’s political action committee, Georgia Next. [6] [7]

Munger was a “substantial donor” in support of former President Barack Obama,[8] including providing a $250,000 donation to the left-of-center Organizing for Action (OFA), a nonprofit supporting President Obama’s election. [9]

Political Contributions

Philip Munger is co-chair of the left-of-center advocacy group Future Majority. [10] He has made several six- and seven-figure donations to Democratic campaigns and organizations in recent years.

In 2020, Munger donated $105,600 to President Joe Biden’s Biden Victory Fund. In 2018, he donated  $100,000 Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC) and $100,000 to the Democratic Senate Campaign Committee (DSCC). In 2016, Munger made donations of  $1,000,000 and $850,000 to Priorities USA Action, $416,100 to the Hillary Victory Fund, $200,000 to the Hillary Action Fund, $150,000 to the Senate Majority PAC, and $100,000 to the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee (DCCC). [11] Munger also donated $353,4000 to the Hillary Victory Fund in 2015. [12]

In 2015, Munger was the Virginia Democratic Party’s single largest donor,[13] supplying $1,000,000 of the $1,700,000 in direct donations that the Virginia Democratic Party received for state races. [14] Munger also provided more than one-fifth of all of the funding that then-Virginia Governor Terry McAuliffe (D) raised. [15] These donations made Munger the largest donor to the Virginia Democratic Party since at least 1995. [16]

Munger’s 2015 out-of-state donations were not limited to Virginia. That same year, he gave a $35,000 donation to Democratic Party politician and activist Stacey Abrams’s political action committee,[17] Georgia Next. [18]

Between 2008 and 2013, Munger donated approximately $450,000 to Democratic candidates. [19] This includes $250,000 to Organizing for Action (OFA), a nonprofit that supported the election of former President Barack Obama. [20] The $250,000 donation was Munger’s first and largest contribution to OFA. [21]

Munger also has made donations of less than $100,000 to various state-level Democratic Party candidates, organizations, and political action committees. He has supported House Majority PAC, the Obama Victory Fund,  New Directions for America, Biden for President, Amy for America, Hillary for America, the Franken Recount Fund, and others with such donations. [22]

Early Life and Personal Information

Philip Munger is the son of Charles Munger, the longtime business partner of liberal investor Warren Buffett. [23]

Munger’s father, Charles, is a longtime Republican donor. Philip’s siblings, Molly Munger and Charles Munger, Jr., also have a history of making political donations. [24]

According to donor disclosures, Munger occasionally lists his employer as the New School, a left-progressive university in New York. [25] He has also listed policy analyst, investor, educator, philanthropist, and consultant as his field of work. [26]

References

  1. Vozzella, laura. “Virginia’s Democratic Party relies heavily on one donor – a New Yorker.” Washington Post. October 30, 2015. Accessed via Web Archive. https://web.archive.org/web/20151031202549/https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/virginia-politics/virginias-democratic-party-relies-heavily-on-one-donor–a-new-yorker/2015/10/30/37dde2ca-7e46-11e5-b575-d8dcfedb4ea1_story.html. ^
  2. Severns, Maggie. “Top Dem Strategists launch secret-money group to rebrand party.” Politico. April 29, 2019. Accessed June 5, 2021. https://www.politico.com/story/2019/04/29/democrats-money-future-majority-1291388. ^
  3. “Philip Munger.” Individual Contributions. Federal Election Committee. Accessed June 5, 2021. https://www.fec.gov/data/receipts/individual-contributions/?contributor_name=philip%20munger. ^
  4. Fain, Travis. “River of political money in Virginia is deep and wide.” Daily Press (Virginia Tidewater). December 13, 2015. Accessed June 6, 2021. https://www.dailypress.com/tidewater-review/dp-nws-political-money-20151204-story.html. ^
  5. Vozzella, Laura. “$250K for McAuliffe’s party gripe about meddling New Yorkers.” Washington Post.  February 17, 2016. Accessed via web archive. June 5, 2021. https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/dc-politics/250k-for-mcauliffes-party-despite-gripe-about-meddling-new-yorkers/2016/02/17/8a7fae86-d595-11e5-be55-2cc3c1e4b76b_story.html. ^
  6. Balu, Max. “The new New Georgia Project: Stacey Abrams’s $10 million plan to double down on voter registration.” Atlanta Magazine. November 30, 2015. https://www.atlantamagazine.com/news-culture-articles/the-new-new-georgia-project-stacey-abramss-10-million-plan-to-double-down-on-voter-registration/. ^
  7. “Campaign Contribution Disclosure Report – Contributions.” Georgia Government Transparency and Campaign Finance Commission. June 30th – Non-Election Year Report. 2015. https://media.ethics.ga.gov/search/Campaign/Campaign_ByContributions_RFR.aspx?NameID=12563&FilerID=NC2011000035&CDRID=115984&Name=Georgia%20Next,%20Inc.&Year=2015&Report=June%2030th%20-%20Non-Election%20Year. ^
  8. Vozzella, Laura. “$250K for McAuliffe’s party gripe about meddling New Yorkers.” Washington Post.  February 17, 2016. Accessed via web archive. June 5, 2021. https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/dc-politics/250k-for-mcauliffes-party-despite-gripe-about-meddling-new-yorkers/2016/02/17/8a7fae86-d595-11e5-be55-2cc3c1e4b76b_story.html. ^
  9. Vozzella, Laura. “$250K for McAuliffe’s party gripe about meddling New Yorkers.” Washington Post.  February 17, 2016. Accessed via web archive. June 5, 2021. https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/dc-politics/250k-for-mcauliffes-party-despite-gripe-about-meddling-new-yorkers/2016/02/17/8a7fae86-d595-11e5-be55-2cc3c1e4b76b_story.html. ^
  10. Severns, Maggie. “Top Dem Strategists launch secret-money group to rebrand party.” Politico. April 29, 2019. Accessed June 5, 2021. https://www.politico.com/story/2019/04/29/democrats-money-future-majority-1291388. ^
  11. “Philip Munger.” Individual Contributions. Federal Election Committee. Accessed June 5, 2021. https://www.fec.gov/data/receipts/individual-contributions/?contributor_name=philip%20munger. ^
  12. “Philip Munger.” Individual Contributions. Federal Election Committee. Accessed June 5, 2021. https://www.fec.gov/data/receipts/individual-contributions/?contributor_name=philip%20munger. ^
  13. Fain, Travis. “River of political money in Virginia is deep and wide.” Daily Press (Virginia Tidewater). December 13, 2015. Accessed June 6, 2021. https://www.dailypress.com/tidewater-review/dp-nws-political-money-20151204-story.html. ^
  14. Vozzella, Laura. “$250K for McAuliffe’s party gripe about meddling New Yorkers.” Washington Post.  February 17, 2016. Accessed via web archive. June 5, 2021. https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/dc-politics/250k-for-mcauliffes-party-despite-gripe-about-meddling-new-yorkers/2016/02/17/8a7fae86-d595-11e5-be55-2cc3c1e4b76b_story.html. ^
  15. Vozzella, Laura. “Virginia’s Democratic Party relies heavily on one donor – A New Yorker.” Washington Post. October 30, 2015. Accessed Via Web Archive December 22, 2016. https://web.archive.org/web/20161222180504/https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/virginia-politics/virginias-democratic-party-relies-heavily-on-one-donor–a-new-yorker/2015/10/30/37dde2ca-7e46-11e5-b575-d8dcfedb4ea1_story.html. ^
  16. Vozzella, laura. “Virginia’s Democratic Party relies heavily on one donor – a New Yorker.” Washington Post. October 30, 2015. Accessed via Web Archive. https://web.archive.org/web/20151031202549/https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/virginia-politics/virginias-democratic-party-relies-heavily-on-one-donor–a-new-yorker/2015/10/30/37dde2ca-7e46-11e5-b575-d8dcfedb4ea1_story.html. ^
  17. Balu, Max. “The new New Georgia Project: Stacey Abrams’s $10 million plan to double down on voter registration.” Atlanta Magazine. November 30, 2015. https://www.atlantamagazine.com/news-culture-articles/the-new-new-georgia-project-stacey-abramss-10-million-plan-to-double-down-on-voter-registration/. ^
  18. “Campaign Contribution Disclosure Report – Contributions.” Georgia Government Transparency and Campaign Finance Commission. June 30th – Non-Election Year Report. 2015. https://media.ethics.ga.gov/search/Campaign/Campaign_ByContributions_RFR.aspx?NameID=12563&FilerID=NC2011000035&CDRID=115984&Name=Georgia%20Next,%20Inc.&Year=2015&Report=June%2030th%20-%20Non-Election%20Year. ^
  19. Kirchgaessner, Stephanie and McCrum, Dan. “Obama backers point to ‘grassroots’ funding.” Financial Times. April 12, 2013. Accessed via Web Archive June 5, 2021. https://archive.is/rXqRr. ^
  20. Rogers, Alex. “Obama’s Grassroots Moneybags: The Top 19 Organizing for Action Donors.” Time Magazine. November 11, 2013. https://swampland.time.com/2013/11/11/obamas-grassroots-moneybags-the-top-19-organizing-for-action-donors/. ^
  21. Rogers, Alex. “Obama’s Grassroots Moneybags: The Top 19 Organizing for Action Donors.” Time Magazine. November 11, 2013. https://swampland.time.com/2013/11/11/obamas-grassroots-moneybags-the-top-19-organizing-for-action-donors/. ^
  22. “Philip Munger.” Individual Contributions. Federal Election Committee. Accessed June 5, 2021. https://www.fec.gov/data/receipts/individual-contributions/?contributor_name=philip%20munger. ^
  23. Vozzella, laura. “Virginia’s Democratic Party relies heavily on one donor – a New Yorker.” Washington Post. October 30, 2015. Accessed via Web Archive. https://web.archive.org/web/20151031202549/https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/virginia-politics/virginias-democratic-party-relies-heavily-on-one-donor–a-new-yorker/2015/10/30/37dde2ca-7e46-11e5-b575-d8dcfedb4ea1_story.html. ^
  24. Vozzella, Laura. “Virginia’s Democratic Party relies heavily on one donor – A New Yorker.” Washington Post. October 30, 2015. Accessed Via Web Archive December 22, 2016. https://web.archive.org/web/20161222180504/https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/virginia-politics/virginias-democratic-party-relies-heavily-on-one-donor–a-new-yorker/2015/10/30/37dde2ca-7e46-11e5-b575-d8dcfedb4ea1_story.html. ^
  25. Vozzella, Laura. “Virginia’s Democratic Party relies heavily on one donor – A New Yorker.” Washington Post. October 30, 2015. Accessed Via Web Archive December 22, 2016. https://web.archive.org/web/20161222180504/https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/virginia-politics/virginias-democratic-party-relies-heavily-on-one-donor–a-new-yorker/2015/10/30/37dde2ca-7e46-11e5-b575-d8dcfedb4ea1_story.html. ^
  26. Vozzella, Laura. “Virginia’s Democratic Party relies heavily on one donor – A New Yorker.” Washington Post. October 30, 2015. Accessed Via Web Archive December 22, 2016. https://web.archive.org/web/20161222180504/https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/virginia-politics/virginias-democratic-party-relies-heavily-on-one-donor–a-new-yorker/2015/10/30/37dde2ca-7e46-11e5-b575-d8dcfedb4ea1_story.html. ^

Connected Organizations

  1. Democracy Alliance Conferences (Other Group)
    Participant, Spring 2016
  2. Future Majority (Non-profit)
    Co-Chair
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