Person

Katherine Lorenz

Nationality:

American

Occupation:

Chair of the Cynthia and George Mitchell Foundation

Residence:

New York City

Katherine Lorenz is the chair of the board of the left-of-center environmental activist Cynthia and George Mitchell Foundation (CGMF). [1] [2] She supports increased regulation of the natural gas industry and has called changing climate a “social equity issue. [3] [4] [5]

Lorenz is vice-chair of the board of directors of the left-of-center Environmental Defense Fund; [6] co-founder of the Next Gen of Giving Pledge group, [7] which asks donors to commit a majority of their wealth to  charity; [8] and a board member of the left-of-center Resource Generation. [9] She opposed Trump administration’s decision to leave the Paris Climate Accords, [10] opposed the construction of a border wall between the U.S. and Mexico, [11] and has shared posts on Twitter encouraging contributions to the Black Lives Matter movement. [12]

Career

Katherine Lorenz is the chairman of the board of the left-of-center environmental-activist Cynthia and George Mitchell Foundation. Prior to becoming chair in October 2020, Lorenz was the foundation’s president from May 2011 until October 2022. Lorenz is the granddaughter of the CGMF’s founders. [13] [14]

Lorenz has been named to several young philanthropic leadership lists. [15] She has received philanthropic guidance from Margaret Dulany, the daughter of David Rockefeller, through her participation in the Synergos Institute’s Global Philanthropists Circle. [16]

Lorenz’s work with the CGMF is based on environmental protection, the critical race theory-inspired concept of social equity, and expanding economic vibrancy. Lorenz has called changing climate a “social equity issue.” [17] She advocates for the use of weather-dependent energy as a part of climate-related energy policies [18] and supports additional water-driven and weather-dependent energy use. Lorenz supports regional conservation and land conservation efforts and works to shape the rules and increase regulation of the natural gas industry. [19] [20]

In addition to her role with CGMF, Lorenz is vice-chair of the board of directors of the left-wing Environmental Defense Fund, is vice-chair of the Philanthropy Workshop, [21] and sits on the board of the Endowment for Regional Sustainability Science. [22] She is a senior advisor at the National Center for Family Philanthropy, [23] treasurer of Puente a la Salud Comunitaria, [24] [25] a member of the Council of Foundations Committee, [26] and a member of Boldly Go Philanthropy’s advisory council. [27]

Lorenz is also a leader and co-founder of the Next Gen of Giving Pledge, [28] which asks donors to commit a majority of their wealth to charity. [29] She is on the Philanthropists Council of the Beacon Collaborative, the Leadership Council of the Greater Houston Community Foundation, and the national advisory committee of USC’s Irene Hirano Inouye Philanthropic Leadership Fund. [30] She regularly speaks at National Center for Family Philanthropy events. [31] [32] [33]

Previously Lorenz was a fellow and board chair at the National Center for Family Philanthropy; deputy director for the Institute of Philanthropy; [34] a board member of Exponent Philanthropy, Resource Generation, and the Amaranth Institute; and a member of the National Academies’ Roundtable of Science and Technology for Sustainability. [35]

Political Positions

Katherine Lorenz opposed the Trump administration’s decision to leave the Paris Climate Accords; [36] opposed the construction of a border wall between the U.S. and Mexico, calling it a “barrier to wildlife as well as people”; [37] and shared posts on Twitter encouraging contributions to the far-left Black Lives Matter movement. [38]

Personal Information

Katherine Lorenz received a bachelor’s degree in economics and Spanish from Davidson College in 2001. [39] She resides in New York City. [40]

References

  1. “Katherine Lorenz.” LinkedIn. Accessed February 17, 2022. https://www.linkedin.com/in/katherinelorenz/. ^
  2. Rutledge, Tanya. “Young Houston philanthropist Katherine Lorenz discusses challenges.” Houston Business Journal. Published 2012. Accessed February 17, 2022. https://www.bizjournals.com/houston/print-edition/2012/11/16/young-houston-philanthropist-katherine.html. ^
  3. Goldstein, Steve. “Here’s Where Katherine Lorenz Got the Idea of Saving the World.” Inside Philanthropy. June 27, 2014. Accessed February 17, 2022. https://www.insidephilanthropy.com/home/2014/6/27/heres-where-katherine-lorenz-got-the-idea-of-saving-the-worl.html. ^
  4. “Interview with Katherine Lorenz.” YouTube. Posted August 12, 2013. Accessed February 17, 2022. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WFwwWeMyShM. ^
  5. Rutledge, Tanya. “Young Houston philanthropist Katherine Lorenz discusses challenges.” Houston Business Journal. Published 2012. Accessed February 17, 2022. https://www.bizjournals.com/houston/print-edition/2012/11/16/young-houston-philanthropist-katherine.html. ^
  6. “The Philanthropy Workshop Inc.” Return of Organization Exempt From Income Tax. (Form 990). 2019. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/organizations/980592591/202013219349310291/full. ^
  7. “Boldly Go Philanthropy.” LinkedIn. Posted December 2021. Accessed February 17, 2022. https://www.linkedin.com/posts/boldly-go-philanthropy_philanthropy-activity-6874060086411575296-8rRa. ^
  8. “Boldly Go Philanthropy.” LinkedIn. Posted December 2021. Accessed February 17, 2022. https://www.linkedin.com/posts/boldly-go-philanthropy_philanthropy-activity-6874060086411575296-8rRa. ^
  9. “Katherine Lorenz.” Tinker Foundation. Accessed February 17, 2022. https://tinker.org/katherine-lorenz/. ^
  10. “Tweet.” Twitter. June 3, 2017. Accessed February 17, 2022. https://twitter.com/katherinelorenz/status/870958319271198720?s=21. ^
  11. “Tweet.” Twitter. Posted February 22, 2017. Accessed February 17, 2022. https://twitter.com/katherinelorenz/status/836187938014769152?s=21. ^
  12. “Tweet.” Twitter. Posted August 30, 2016. Accessed February 17, 2022. https://twitter.com/katherinelorenz/status/770755580747210752?s=21. ^
  13. “Katherine Lorenz.” LinkedIn. Accessed February 17, 2022. https://www.linkedin.com/in/katherinelorenz/. ^
  14. Rutledge, Tanya. “Young Houston philanthropist Katherine Lorenz discusses challenges.” Houston Business Journal. Published 2012. Accessed February 17, 2022. https://www.bizjournals.com/houston/print-edition/2012/11/16/young-houston-philanthropist-katherine.html. ^
  15. Goldstein, Steve. “Here’s Where Katherine Lorenz Got the Idea of Saving the World.” Inside Philanthropy. June 27, 2014. Accessed February 17, 2022. https://www.insidephilanthropy.com/home/2014/6/27/heres-where-katherine-lorenz-got-the-idea-of-saving-the-worl.html. ^
  16.  Goldstein, Steve. “Here’s Where Katherine Lorenz Got the Idea of Saving the World.” Inside Philanthropy. June 27, 2014. Accessed February 17, 2022. https://www.insidephilanthropy.com/home/2014/6/27/heres-where-katherine-lorenz-got-the-idea-of-saving-the-worl.html. ^
  17. Lorenz, Katherine. “Family Philanthropy Versus Climate Change: An Opportunity of a Lifetime and Beyond.” National Center for Family Philanthropy. January 5, 2022. Accessed February 17, 2022. https://www.ncfp.org/2022/01/05/family-philanthropy-versus-climate-change-an-opportunity-of-a-lifetime-and-beyond/. ^
  18. Lorenz, Katherine. “Family Philanthropy Versus Climate Change: An Opportunity of a Lifetime and Beyond.” National Center for Family Philanthropy. January 5, 2022. Accessed February 17, 2022. https://www.ncfp.org/2022/01/05/family-philanthropy-versus-climate-change-an-opportunity-of-a-lifetime-and-beyond/. ^
  19. “Interview with Katherine Lorenz.” YouTube. Posted August 12, 2013. Accessed February 17, 2022. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WFwwWeMyShM. ^
  20. Rutledge, Tanya. “Young Houston philanthropist Katherine Lorenz discusses challenges.” Houston Business Journal. Published 2012. Accessed February 17, 2022. https://www.bizjournals.com/houston/print-edition/2012/11/16/young-houston-philanthropist-katherine.html. ^
  21. “The Philanthropy Workshop Inc.” Return of Organization Exempt From Income Tax. (Form 990). 2019. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/organizations/980592591/202013219349310291/full. ^
  22. “Boldly Go Philanthropy.” LinkedIn. Posted December 2021. Accessed February 17, 2022. https://www.linkedin.com/posts/boldly-go-philanthropy_philanthropy-activity-6874060086411575296-8rRa. ^
  23. “National Center for Family Philanthropy Inc.” Return of Organization Exempt From Income Tax. (Form 990). 2019. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/organizations/522055016/202043149349301749/full. ^
  24. “Puente a la Salud Comunitaria.” Return of Organization Exempt From Income Tax. (Form 990). 2020. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/organizations/300258491/202141029349300249/full. ^
  25. “Katherine Lorenz.” LinkedIn. Accessed February 17, 2022. https://www.linkedin.com/in/katherinelorenz/. ^
  26. “Katherine Lorenz.” American Geosciences Institute. Accessed February 17, 2022. https://www.americangeosciences.org/content/katherine-lorenz. ^
  27. “Boldly Go Philanthropy.” LinkedIn. Posted December 2021. Accessed February 17, 2022. https://www.linkedin.com/posts/boldly-go-philanthropy_philanthropy-activity-6874060086411575296-8rRa. ^
  28. “Boldly Go Philanthropy.” LinkedIn. Posted December 2021. Accessed February 17, 2022. https://www.linkedin.com/posts/boldly-go-philanthropy_philanthropy-activity-6874060086411575296-8rRa. ^
  29. Rutledge, Tanya. “Young Houston philanthropist Katherine Lorenz discusses challenges.” Houston Business Journal. Published 2012. Accessed February 17, 2022. https://www.bizjournals.com/houston/print-edition/2012/11/16/young-houston-philanthropist-katherine.html. ^
  30. “Katherine Lorenz.” National Center for Family Philanthropy. Accessed February 17, 2022. https://www.ncfp.org/people/katherine-lorenz/page/2/. ^
  31. “Board Chair Peer Network: Finding Peers in Transition.” National Center for Family Philanthropy. Accessed February 17, 2022. https://www.ncfp.org/event/board-chair-peer-network-finding-peers-in-transition/. ^
  32. “Emerging Family Leaders in Philanthropy.” National Center for Family Philanthropy. Accessed February 17, 2022. https://www.ncfp.org/event/emerging-family-leaders-in-philanthropy/. ^
  33. “2021 Trustee Education Institute.” National Center for Family Philanthropy. Accessed February 17, 2022. https://www.ncfp.org/event/2021-trustee-education-institute/. ^
  34. “Katherine Lorenz.” LinkedIn. Accessed February 17, 2022. https://www.linkedin.com/in/katherinelorenz/. ^
  35. “Katherine Lorenz.” Tinker Foundation. Accessed February 17, 2022. https://tinker.org/katherine-lorenz/. ^
  36. “Tweet.” Twitter. June 3, 2017. Accessed February 17, 2022. https://twitter.com/katherinelorenz/status/870958319271198720?s=21. ^
  37. “Tweet.” Twitter. Posted February 22, 2017. Accessed February 17, 2022. https://twitter.com/katherinelorenz/status/836187938014769152?s=21. ^
  38. “Tweet.” Twitter. Posted August 30, 2016. Accessed February 17, 2022. https://twitter.com/katherinelorenz/status/770755580747210752?s=21. ^
  39. “Katherine Lorenz.” LinkedIn. Accessed February 17, 2022. https://www.linkedin.com/in/katherinelorenz/. ^
  40. “Katherine Lorenz.” LinkedIn. Accessed February 17, 2022. https://www.linkedin.com/in/katherinelorenz/. ^
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