Person

Cecile Richards

Cecile Richards, president of the Planned Parenthood Federation of America (link) by CarlB104 is licensed CC BY 2.0 (link)
Born:

1957 in Waco, TX

Residence:

New York, NY

Spouse:

Kirk Adams

Occupation:

Abortion Activist

President, Planned Parenthood Federation of America (2006-2018)

President, Planned Parenthood Action Fund

President, Planned Parenthood Votes

Former Positions:

Labor Union Organizer

Deputy Chief of Staff, Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-CA) (2002-2003)

Co-Founder, America Coming Together

Co-Founder, America Votes

Founder, Texas Freedom Network

Cecile Richards is a social liberal activist who worked as president of the Planned Parenthood Federation of America from 2006 through 2018.[1] As president of Planned Parenthood, Richards built the organization’s political and advocacy arm from nearly non-existent into a political powerhouse.[2] Under Richards, the number of abortions provided annually by Planned Parenthood increased by 56,000 (21%)[3] and the amount of annual federal funding given to the organization grew by nearly $200 million (58%).[4][5] Richards announced her intention to step down as Planned Parenthood’s president in 2018.[6]

Under Richards, the organization created the massive super PAC Planned Parenthood Votes[7] which has spent over $35 million supporting pro-abortion politicians,[8] and dramatically increased the size of the organization’s lobbying and advocacy arm, known as Planned Parenthood Action Fund. [9]

Prior to her work for Planned Parenthood, Richards served as the deputy chief of staff to then-minority whip Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-California).[10] She also founded a number of influential liberal organizations. In 2003-2004 she co-founded and presided over America Coming Together[11] and America Votes, [12] two of the “527” political committees that were created to support the Presidential campaign of then-U.S. Senator John Kerry (D-Massachusetts). Together these two organizations coordinated hundreds of millions of dollars[13] worth of spending among a large number of liberal donors and influence organizations including George Soros, Peter Lewis, the AFL-CIO, the Association of Trial Lawyers of America, the Sierra Club, Planned Parenthood, and the American Federation of Teachers.[14][15] Richards also founded the Texas Freedom Network to support abortion policies in Texas while opposing the agenda of the state’s religious conservatives. [16]

Richards also spent nearly a decade as a national union organizer, most notably running the SEIU’s “justice for janitors” campaign in Los Angeles. [17]

Richards was invited to President Barack Obama’s White House 39 times,[18] and is credited with firming up the Democratic Party’s embrace of abortion rights “as a central part of the party’s platform.”[19] Time named Richards one of the most influential people in the world during President Obama’s first term.[20]

Background and Early Career

Cecile Richards was born in Waco, Texas in 1957. Her father, Dave Richards, was one of the most active labor-union lawyers in Texas, and her mother, Ann Richards, was a politician who is (as of 2018) the most recent Democrat to serve as Governor of Texas.[21][22]

Before college, Cecile and her mother worked for Sara Weddington’s 1972 campaign for the Texas State House. Weddington came to fame as the lawyer who successfully argued Roe v. Wade before the U.S. Supreme Court.[23]

Cecile met her husband Kirk Adams while the two were working as union organizers. Adams currently works for the Service Employees International Union (SEIU)[24] and the couple lives in New York City.[25] They have three children. Lily, the oldest, has served as the press secretary for U.S. Senator Tim Kaine (D-Virginia)[26] and worked for Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign.[27]

Political Activism

Labor Union Career

While at Brown University, Cecile Richards supported a janitors’ strike, helping her into a career as a union organizer.  Beginning in 1980,[28] she traveled the country running a number of union organizing campaigns for garment workers in the Rio Grande Valley,  nursing home employees in East Texas, and hotel workers in New Orleans.[29]

In the late 1980s, Richards led the SEIU’s “Justice for Janitors” campaign, which unionized and demanded higher pay for cleaning crews in Los Angeles.[30]

In 1990 Richards and her family moved to Austin so she could run her mother’s gubernatorial campaigns.[31] [32] After her mother lost re-election in 1994 (to future President George W. Bush), Cecile created the Texas Freedom Network, an influential liberal group[33] to combat religious conservative “issues, organizations, money and leaders” and to combat the pro-life agenda. [34]

Nancy Pelosi Staffer

In 2002 and 2003 Richards served as Rep. Nancy Pelosi’s deputy chief of staff during Pelosi’s time as Democratic whip in the House of Representatives.[35] Pelosi touted Richards’s efforts saying, “Cecile helped me set up the whip office […] Everyone knows she’s politically astute and a wonderful communicator, but she’s also a great administrator. She could be the President.”[36]

Political Action Committees

In 2003, Richards co-founded America Coming Together (ACT),[37] a pro-Democratic 527 political action committee that raised about $200 million from George Soros, Peter Lewis, and a variety of Hollywood moguls.[38] Other prominent liberals involved in ACT included Ellen Malcolm of EMILY’s List, Steve Rosenthal of the AFL-CIO, and former Clinton White House operative Harold Ickes.[39]

In 2004, Richards founded and then served as the president of the liberal 527 organization America Votes[40] “a Washington-based coalition of 32 of the biggest, richest, and most influential unions and liberal interest groups in the country.”[41] America Votes’ members included ACT, the AFL-CIO, the Association of Trial Lawyers of America, the Sierra Club, the NAACP, the League of Conservation Voters, Planned Parenthood, and the American Federation of Teachers (AFT). [42]

America Votes coordinated its member organizations’ get-out-the-vote efforts, which together spent about $350 million during the 2004 presidential campaign [43] to supplement the Democratic effort in support of John Kerry’s 2004 presidential campaign. [44]

Planned Parenthood

Also see Planned Parenthood Federation of America (Nonprofit)

From 2006 through 2018, Cecile Richards served as president of Planned Parenthood Federation of America and the Planned Parenthood Action Fund.[45] In January 2018, Richards announced her intention to leave Planned Parenthood, vowing to remain a constant advocate for the organization’s liberal policy agenda.[46]

During her time at the head of Planned Parenthood, “Richards greatly expanded the organization’s fundraising and organizing capabilities — and helped raise its profile through celebrity-oriented campaigns and increased political participation.”[47] According to Time, when Richards took the reins at Planned Parenthood in 2006, “the organization didn’t even have a centralized website.” However, under her leadership it gained “much more political heft” that resulted in President Barack Obama mentioning Planned Parenthood during his 2012 presidential debates.[48]

According to Buzzfeed, Richards’ and Planned Parenthood’s advocacy could largely be credited with the Democratic Party’s embrace of abortion rights “as a central part of the party’s platform.”[49]

Organizational Growth

Under Richards’ leadership, the number of abortion services provided annually grew by over 56,000 procedures (21%) from 2005 through 2017.[50]

Richards presided over massive growth in the organization; its volunteers and supporters reportedly grew from 2.5 million to 11 million.[51] The group’s annual revenues grew by $560 million (62%) to $1.46 billion in 2016. Notably, Planned Parenthood’s national office budget under Richards jumped from $67.5 million in 2006 to $437 million in 2017.[52] [53]

Additionally, the amount of annual government funded money that Planned Parenthood receives grew by nearly $200 million (58%) under Richards. [54] [55]

Political Support

Shortly after taking over as president of Planned Parenthood Richards delivered an emphatic speech where she pledged “to swing the vote in 2006, 2008 and 2010” and to use the power gained from those elections to influence legislative policy.  She specifically promised that under her watch “Planned Parenthood [was] going to become more political” so that she could beat back pro-life policy opponents.[56]

In 2010 Richards started the super PAC Planned Parenthood Votes.[57] Between 2012 and 2016 Planned Parenthood Votes spent over $35 million.[58]

In 2008, Richards called Barack Obama “a passionate advocate for women’s rights” and touted Planned Parenthood’s endorsement of his candidacy.[59] In 2016, Richards was a key supporter of Hillary Clinton’s presidential campaign, touting that there had never been a Presidential ticket more committed to Planned Parenthood’s pro-abortion agenda than that of Hillary Clinton and Sen. Tim Kaine.[60] In total, Planned Parenthood’s various entities spent at least $38 million to elect Democrats in 2016.[61]

Lobbying and Policy

Under Richards’ leadership Planned Parenthood’s lobbying spending grew from a low of $365,000 in 2006 to a high of $1.9 million in 2011.[62] In total under Richards, Planned Parenthood Federation of America spent over $13 million on lobbying.[63]

Similarly, the budget for the Planned Parenthood Action Fund, the organization’s formal 501(c)(4) lobbying arm, grew from $4.3 million the year before Richards took over to  $24.8 million in 2015.[64]

When asked to prioritize “the most important part of Planned Parenthood’s work,” Richards said that the organization’s lobbying efforts were just as important as its provision of healthcare services.[65]

In 2010 Richards celebrated the passage of Obamacare with President Barack Obama, and she proclaimed that House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s efforts to pass the legislation had been “heroic.”[66] Richards said she was “most proud” of securing the Obamacare mandate that required all insurers to provide birth control for free. [67]

In 2017, Richards, flanked by House Democratic Leader Nancy Pelosi and the House’s Pro-Choice Caucus, pledged to fight against Republican efforts to defund Planned Parenthood and launched the “I Stand With Planned Parenthood” campaign.[68]

Congressional Testimony

In 2015, after a series of videos released by the pro-life Center for Medical Progress seemed to show that Planned Parenthood was selling fetal tissue for profit in a dubiously legal manner, Richards testified before Congress defending her organization. She said she was “proud” of Planned Parenthood’s provision of fetal tissue while trying to minimize “the organ donations as a small part of [Planned Parenthood’s] work.”[69]

Post-Planned Parenthood

Richards has stated that, after her departure from Planned Parenthood, she plans to “pour herself into the midterm elections, fund-raising and campaigning for Democrats”[70] and to increase and organize the number of women who run for office and who vote.[71]

She also wrote a book entitled Make Trouble: Standing Up, Speaking Out, and Finding the Courage to Lead — My Life Story, published in April 2018.[72] Hillary Clinton praised the book calling it “practical advice and inspirations for aspiring leaders everywhere” and U.S. Senator Kamala Harris (D-California) called it a “must-read.”[73]

References

  1. Petrocelli, Elaine. “Cecile Richards – Make Trouble (Dominican University).” Book Passage. April 12, 2018. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://www.bookpassage.com/maketrouble
  2. Cramer, Ruby and O’Conor, Ema. “Cecile Richards Plans To Step Down As President Of Planned Parenthood, After More Than A Decade.” Buzzfeed. January 24, 2018. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://www.buzzfeed.com/rubycramer/cecile-richards-plans-to-step-down-as-president-of-planned?bftwnews&utm_term=.hqBlYQLVO#.vrbvDMy0Z
  3. Annual reports. Planned Parenthood. 2006 through 2017. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://www.plannedparenthood.org/about-us/facts-figures/annual-report
  4. Annual Report. Planned Parenthood. 2006. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://web.archive.org/web/20081023220156/http://www.plannedparenthood.org/files/PPFA/Annual_report.pdf
  5. Annual Report. Planned Parenthood. 2016. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://www.plannedparenthood.org/uploads/filer_public/d4/50/d450c016-a6a9-4455-bf7f-711067db5ff7/20171229_ar16-17_p01_lowres.pdf
  6. OConnor, Ruby Cramer Ema. “Cecile Richards Plans To Step Down As President Of Planned Parenthood, After More Than A Decade.” BuzzFeed. January 24, 2018. Accessed January 24, 2018. https://www.buzzfeed.com/rubycramer/cecile-richards-plans-to-step-down-as-president-of-planned?utm_term=.ksAgMoXmQe#.kezpV7WQ3N
  7. O’Bannon, Randall. “Planned Parenthood President Cecile Richards Stepping Down: Conclusion.” National Right To Life News Today. February 2, 2018. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://www.nationalrighttolifenews.org/news/2018/02/planned-parenthood-president-cecile-richards-stepping-conclusion/
  8. Center For Responsive Politics. Planned Parenthood Votes. Opensecrets.org. Updated November 27, 2017. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://www.opensecrets.org/pacs/lookup2.php?strID=C00489799&cycle=2016
  9. “Return of Organization Exempt from Income Tax: Planned Parenthood Action Fund.” Pro Publica Nonprofit Explorer. 2005 and 2015. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/organizations/133539048
  10. Cox, Laverne. “Cecile Richards.” Interview Magazine. March 29, 2016. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://www.interviewmagazine.com/culture/cecile-richards
  11. The Center For Media and Democracy. “Cecile Richards.” Sourcewatch.org. Undated. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=Cecile_Richards
  12. Rayasam, Renuka. “Cecile Richards to depart Planned Parenthood.” Politico. January 24, 2018. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://www.politico.com/story/2018/01/24/cecile-richards-planned-parenthood-308361
  13. Martinez, Gebe. “TEXANS IN WASHINGTON.” Houston Chronicle, May 7, 2006. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://web.archive.org/web/20080925151018/http://www.chron.com/CDA/archives/archive.mpl?id=2006_4111584
  14. York, Byron. “America Coming Together Comes Apart.” National Review. August 3, 2005. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://www.nationalreview.com/2005/08/america-coming-together-comes-apart-byron-york/
  15. Gwynne, S.C. “The Daughter Also Rises.” Texas Monthly. August 2004. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://www.texasmonthly.com/politics/the-daughter-also-rises/
  16. Martinez, Gebe. “TEXANS IN WASHINGTON.” Houston Chronicle, May 7, 2006. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://web.archive.org/web/20080925151018/http://www.chron.com/CDA/archives/archive.mpl?id=2006_4111584
  17. Martinez, Gebe. “TEXANS IN WASHINGTON.” Houston Chronicle, May 7, 2006. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://web.archive.org/web/20080925151018/http://www.chron.com/CDA/archives/archive.mpl?id=2006_4111584
  18. Hughes, Brittany. “Planned Parenthood President Made 39 Visits To Obama’s White House Since 2009.” CNS News. July 31, 2015. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://www.cnsnews.com/news/article/brittany-m-hughes/planned-parenthood-president-made-39-visits-obamas-white-house-2009
  19. Cramer, Ruby and O’Conor, Ema. “Cecile Richards Plans To Step Down As President Of Planned Parenthood, After More Than A Decade.” Buzzfeed. January 24, 2018. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://www.buzzfeed.com/rubycramer/cecile-richards-plans-to-step-down-as-president-of-planned?bftwnews&utm_term=.hqBlYQLVO#.vrbvDMy0Z
  20. Petrocelli, Elaine. “Cecile Richards – Make Trouble (Dominican University).” Book Passage. April 12, 2018. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://www.bookpassage.com/maketrouble
  21. Gwynne, S.C. “The Daughter Also Rises.” Texas Monthly. August 2004. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://www.texasmonthly.com/politics/the-daughter-also-rises/
  22. Martinez, Gebe. “TEXANS IN WASHINGTON.” Houston Chronicle, May 7, 2006. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://web.archive.org/web/20080925151018/http://www.chron.com/CDA/archives/archive.mpl?id=2006_4111584
  23. Parks, Scott. “For Sarah Weddington, the lawyer who won Roe vs. Wade, celebrity — or notoriety — came early.” Dallas News. January 2015. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://www.dallasnews.com/news/news/2013/01/19/for-sarah-weddington-the-lawyer-who-won-roe-vs.-wade-celebrity–or-notoriety–came-early
  24. Toobin, Jeffrey. “Daughters of Texas.” The New Yorker. August 5, 2013. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2013/08/05/daughters-of-texas
  25. “Cecile Richards.” Planned Parenthood. Undated. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://www.plannedparenthood.org/about-us/our-leadership/cecile-richards
  26. Toobin, Jeffrey. “Daughters of Texas.” The New Yorker. August 5, 2013. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2013/08/05/daughters-of-texas
  27. Basu, Rekha. “Column: Ann Richards’ granddaughter working for Clinton in Iowa.” Des Moines Register. September 10, 2015. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://www.desmoinesregister.com/story/opinion/columnists/rekha-basu/caucus/2015/09/10/column-ann-richards-granddaughter-working-clinton-iowa/72019682/
  28. Gwynne, S.C. “The Daughter Also Rises.” Texas Monthly. August 2004. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://www.texasmonthly.com/politics/the-daughter-also-rises/
  29. Martinez, Gebe. “TEXANS IN WASHINGTON.” Houston Chronicle, May 7, 2006. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://web.archive.org/web/20080925151018/http://www.chron.com/CDA/archives/archive.mpl?id=2006_4111584
  30. Martinez, Gebe. “TEXANS IN WASHINGTON.” Houston Chronicle, May 7, 2006. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://web.archive.org/web/20080925151018/http://www.chron.com/CDA/archives/archive.mpl?id=2006_4111584
  31. Gwynne, S.C. “The Daughter Also Rises.” Texas Monthly. August 2004. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://www.texasmonthly.com/politics/the-daughter-also-rises/
  32. Jones, Sarah. “What Democrats Can Learn From Cecile Richards.” The New Republic. January 29, 2018. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://newrepublic.com/article/146806/democrats-can-learn-cecile-richards
  33. Jones, Sarah. “What Democrats Can Learn From Cecile Richards.” The New Republic. January 29, 2018. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://newrepublic.com/article/146806/democrats-can-learn-cecile-richards
  34. Martinez, Gebe. “TEXANS IN WASHINGTON.” Houston Chronicle, May 7, 2006. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://web.archive.org/web/20080925151018/http://www.chron.com/CDA/archives/archive.mpl?id=2006_4111584
  35. Cox, Laverne. “Cecile Richards.” Interview Magazine. March 29, 2016. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://www.interviewmagazine.com/culture/cecile-richards
  36. Toobin, Jeffrey. “Daughters of Texas.” The New Yorker. August 5, 2013. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2013/08/05/daughters-of-texas
  37. The Center For Media and Democracy. “Cecile Richards.” Sourcewatch.org. Undated. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://www.sourcewatch.org/index.php?title=Cecile_Richards
  38. York, Byron. “America Coming Together Comes Apart.” National Review. August 3, 2005. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://www.nationalreview.com/2005/08/america-coming-together-comes-apart-byron-york/
  39. York, Byron. “America Coming Together Comes Apart.” National Review. August 3, 2005. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://www.nationalreview.com/2005/08/america-coming-together-comes-apart-byron-york/
  40. Rayasam, Renuka. “Cecile Richards to depart Planned Parenthood.” Politico. January 24, 2018. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://www.politico.com/story/2018/01/24/cecile-richards-planned-parenthood-308361
  41. Gwynne, S.C. “The Daughter Also Rises.” Texas Monthly. August 2004. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://www.texasmonthly.com/politics/the-daughter-also-rises/
  42. Gwynne, S.C. “The Daughter Also Rises.” Texas Monthly. August 2004. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://www.texasmonthly.com/politics/the-daughter-also-rises/
  43. Martinez, Gebe. “TEXANS IN WASHINGTON.” Houston Chronicle, May 7, 2006. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://web.archive.org/web/20080925151018/http://www.chron.com/CDA/archives/archive.mpl?id=2006_4111584
  44. Farhi, Paul. “Democratic Spending Is Team Effort Groups’ Ads Level Field for Kerry.” Washington Post. March 24, 2004. Accessed April 10, 2018. http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A18973-2004Mar23.html
  45. Petrocelli, Elaine. “Cecile Richards – Make Trouble (Dominican University).” Book Passage. April 12, 2018. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://www.bookpassage.com/maketrouble
  46. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2018/01/26/580733009/after-years-in-the-trenches-planned-parenthoods-cecile-richards-will-step-down
  47. Cramer, Ruby and O’Conor, Ema. “Cecile Richards Plans To Step Down As President Of Planned Parenthood, After More Than A Decade.” Buzzfeed. January 24, 2018. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://www.buzzfeed.com/rubycramer/cecile-richards-plans-to-step-down-as-president-of-planned?bftwnews&utm_term=.hqBlYQLVO#.vrbvDMy0Z
  48. Cramer, Ruby and O’Conor, Ema. “Cecile Richards Plans To Step Down As President Of Planned Parenthood, After More Than A Decade.” Buzzfeed. January 24, 2018. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://www.buzzfeed.com/rubycramer/cecile-richards-plans-to-step-down-as-president-of-planned?bftwnews&utm_term=.hqBlYQLVO#.vrbvDMy0Z
  49. Cramer, Ruby and O’Conor, Ema. “Cecile Richards Plans To Step Down As President Of Planned Parenthood, After More Than A Decade.” Buzzfeed. January 24, 2018. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://www.buzzfeed.com/rubycramer/cecile-richards-plans-to-step-down-as-president-of-planned?bftwnews&utm_term=.hqBlYQLVO#.vrbvDMy0Z
  50. Annual reports. Planned Parenthood. 2006 through 2017. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://www.plannedparenthood.org/about-us/facts-figures/annual-report
  51. Chozick, Amy. “Cecile Richards on Her Life After Planned Parenthood.” New York Times. January 26, 2018. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://web.archive.org/web/20180201075608/https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/26/style/cecile-richards-planned-parenthood.html
  52. Annual Report. Planned Parenthood. 2006. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://web.archive.org/web/20081023220156/http://www.plannedparenthood.org/files/PPFA/Annual_report.pdf
  53. Annual report. Planned Parenthood. 2016. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://www.plannedparenthood.org/uploads/filer_public/d4/50/d450c016-a6a9-4455-bf7f-711067db5ff7/20171229_ar16-17_p01_lowres.pdf
  54. Annual Report. Planned Parenthood. 2006. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://web.archive.org/web/20081023220156/http://www.plannedparenthood.org/files/PPFA/Annual_report.pdf
  55. Annual reports. Planned Parenthood. 2016. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://www.plannedparenthood.org/uploads/filer_public/d4/50/d450c016-a6a9-4455-bf7f-711067db5ff7/20171229_ar16-17_p01_lowres.pdf
  56. O’Bannon, Randy. “Cecile Richards Was a Political Activist With No Medical Training. Will Her Replacement be the Same?” LifeNews.com. February 5, 2018. Accessed April 10, 2018. http://www.lifenews.com/2018/02/05/cecile-richards-was-a-political-activist-with-no-medical-training-will-her-replacement-be-the-same/
  57. O’Bannon, Randall. “Planned Parenthood President Cecile Richards Stepping Down: Conclusion.” National Right To Life News Today. February 2, 2018. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://www.nationalrighttolifenews.org/news/2018/02/planned-parenthood-president-cecile-richards-stepping-conclusion/
  58. Center For Responsive Politics. Planned Parenthood Votes. Opensecrets.org. Updated November 27, 2017. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://www.opensecrets.org/pacs/lookup2.php?strID=C00489799&cycle=2016
  59. Zenilman, Avi. “Planned Parenthood endorses Obama.” Politico. July 8, 2008. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://www.politico.com/blogs/ben-smith/2008/07/planned-parenthood-endorses-obama-010150
  60. Richards, Cecile. “Cecile Richards: Tim Kaine Is An Incredible Ally for All Women.” Time. July 26, 2016. Accessed April 10, 2018. http://time.com/4423858/cecile-richards-tim-kaine-hillary-clinton/
  61. Jessen, Leah. “Planned Parenthood Entities Spend Over $38 Million to Elect Democrats.” Daily Signal. December 3, 2016. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://www.dailysignal.com/2016/11/03/planned-parenthood-arms-spend-over-38-million-to-elect-democrats/
  62. Center For Responsive Politics. “Planned Parenthood: Lobbying Summary.” Updated. February 28, 2018. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://www.opensecrets.org/lobby/clientsum.php?id=D000000591
  63. Center For Responsive Politics. “Planned Parenthood: Lobbying Summary.” Updated. February 28, 2018. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://www.opensecrets.org/lobby/clientsum.php?id=D000000591
  64. “Return of Organization Exempt from Income Tax: Planned Parenthood Action Fund.” Pro Publica Nonprofit Explorer. 2005 and 2015. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/organizations/133539048
  65. Cruz, Caitlin. “‘The Calm in This Storm’: Reproductive Rights Leaders Reflect on Cecile Richards’ Legacy.” Rewire News. February 9, 2018. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://rewire.news/article/2018/02/09/calm-storm-reproductive-rights-leaders-reflect-cecile-richards-legacy/
  66. Richards, Cecile. “Call on Women to Get the Job Done Right.” Huffington Post. May 25, 2011. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://www.huffingtonpost.com/cecile-richards/call-on-women-to-get-the_b_512203.html
  67. Toobin, Jeffrey. “Daughters of Texas.” The New Yorker. August 5, 2013. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2013/08/05/daughters-of-texas
  68. Dias, Elizabeth. “Republicans Take Upper Hand in Fight to Defund Planned Parenthood.” Time. January 7, 2017. Accessed April 10, 2018. http://time.com/4626516/planned-parenthood-defund-republicans/
  69. “Planned Parenthood’s Cecile Richards Testifies Before Congress.” CBS News. September 29, 2011.  Accessed April 10, 2018. https://www.cbsnews.com/news/planned-parenthoods-president-on-the-offensive/
  70. Chozick, Amy. “Cecile Richards on Her Life After Planned Parenthood.” New York Times. January 26, 2018. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://web.archive.org/web/20180201075608/https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/26/style/cecile-richards-planned-parenthood.html
  71. Luscombe, Belinda. “Outgoing Planned Parenthood President Cecile Richards Is Not Done Fighting.” Time. March 29, 2018. Accessed April 10, 2018. http://time.com/5220083/outgoing-planned-parenthood-president-cecile-richards-still-wants-to-make-trouble/
  72. Chozick, Amy. “Cecile Richards on Her Life After Planned Parenthood.” New York Times. January 26, 2018. Accessed April 10, 2018. https://web.archive.org/web/20180201075608/https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/26/style/cecile-richards-planned-parenthood.html
  73. Carr, Grace. “You Will Cringe After One Look At Cecile Richards Book Endorsers.” Daily Caller. February 20, 2018. Accessed April 10, 2018. http://dailycaller.com/2018/02/20/cecile-richards-planned-parenthood-make-trouble/
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