Person

Amber McReynolds

Occupation:

Member, USPS Board of Governors (since 2021)

CEO, National Vote at Home Institute & Coalition (2018-2021)

Director of Elections, Denver, CO (2011-2018)

Vote-By-Mail “Reform” Activist

Nationality:

American

Born:

March 7, 1980

Amber McReynolds is a left-of-center vote-by-mail advocate and member of the United States Postal Service board of governors, appointed in 2021 by President Joe Biden as an “independent,” a legal designation that observers dispute. [1] From 2018 to 2021 she was CEO of the National Vote at Home Institute and National Vote at Home Coalition, which support efforts to implement universal mail-in voting in the United States, partnering with left-of-center organizations including the Democracy Fund, Common Cause, Nonprofit VOTE, and Rock the Vote. [2] Prior to that, McReynolds worked in the office of the Director of Elections in Denver, Colorado 2005 to 2018, becoming the agency’s director in 2011. [3]

According to numerous secretaries of state and election officials, McReynolds played a key role in organizing state vote-by-mail efforts during the 2020 presidential election. As head of National Vote at Home Institute and Coalition, she worked alongside allied groups such as the Center for Technology and Civic Life (CTCL) to boost mail-in ballots and related election infrastructure which critics note aided Democrats in the 2020 election. [4] Despite widespread claims of election insecurity related to last-minute changes to state election law governing mail-in ballots, McReynolds has said that “the 2020 election was the most secure election that we’ve ever had” and “the biggest challenge in 2020 was the disinformation and misinformation that occurred.” [5]

McReynolds is also an advocate for using government regulation to federalize elections, which the U.S. Constitution places under control of the states. In May 2021, she told the Associated Press: [6]

I think on the policy front, part of the reason the disinformation spreads . . . is that there are not many federal standards. We need to think about some federal standards [for elections] because it’s easy for bad actors to spread the wrong information because the rules vary so much by state.

Early Life and Education

Amber McReynolds was born on March 7, 1980 to Dana and Carol McReynolds in Kewanee, Illinois. [7] Dana McReynolds, a longtime judge in Henry County, Illinois was appointed to a circuit court judgeship in 2020. Amber McReynolds graduated from Kewanee’s Wethersfield High School in 1997. [8]

McReynolds graduated from the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign in 2001 with a degree in political science and speech communications. She then attended the London School of Economics for a master’s degree in comparative politics, during which she worked for British Labour Party MP Harriet Harman, who later went onto become the Labour Party’s leader and Leader of the Official Opposition. [9]

Following her graduation from the London School of Economics, McReynolds returned to the United States to work for a coordinating council that focused on improving the court process for family and child abuse victims.

Early Career

Public Interest Research Groups (PIRGs)

In 2004, McReynolds began work for the left-of-center New Voters Project in Iowa during the 2004 presidential election. [10] The New Voters Project is a left-of-center voter registration nonprofit that targets likely Democratic voters ahead of elections; it is part of the Public Interest Network (PIN), a collection of over 100 left-wing advocacy groups whose most famous members are the Public Interest Research Groups (PIRGs) originally founded in the late 1960s by political activists and organizers Ralph Nader and Donald Ross. [11] The network has received funding from the Tides Center, a left-of-center fiscal management group and pass-through funder for liberal donors. [12]

The Public Interest Network is well-known for training future left-wing political activists, among them Barack Obama, who told then-U.S. Public Interest Research Group (US-PIRG) director Gene Karpinski in 2004: “I used to be a PIRG guy. You guys trained me well.” [13]

McReynolds is counted among the Public Interest Network’s alumni. In a 2019 newsletter, the network lauded McReynolds alongside Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti (D) and Colorado State Sen. Faith Winter (D). [14]

The New Voters Project held several of McReynolds’s trainings in the city of Denver, Colorado, which reportedly contributed substantially to her decision to work there in the future. [15]

Denver Elections Division

In 2005, McReynolds was hired as an operational coordinator at the Denver Elections Division in Colorado. [16] In 2007, she was promoted to deputy director and, in 2011, appointed to director of elections by then-Denver Clerk and Recorder Stephanie O’Malley. [17]

Under McReynolds, the Denver Elections Division made significant changes to how the city handles its elections, and in her first year as director, she was awarded the city’s “rising star” award by Denver Mayor Michael Hancock (D). [18] McReynolds led the creation of Ballot TRACE, an app that tracks voters’ ballots through the mail, and eSign, an electronic petition-gathering software. [19]

In 2013, McReynolds helped Colorado adopt an all-mail election system in a major voting bill which also allowed election-day voter registration. The legislation made Colorado one of five states prior to 2020 to conduct all elections by mail, and it was among the first states to allow for same-day voter registration. [20]

The controversial bill was criticized for decreasing election security, given the ease of ballot access. [21] At the time, McReynolds downplayed the threat of election insecurity and ballot fraud under the state’s all-mail system, claiming ignorance of the concept: “I’m not sure, to be honest, what is an illegal vote. . . . What does that mean?” [22]

In response to President Donald Trump’s creation of a Commission on Election Integrity to investigate fraud and voter suppression in 2017, McReynolds authored an op-ed in the Denver Post accusing Trump of “frightening away Denver voters” and withdraw their voter registrations due to Republicans’ supposed partisanship and unclear mission (the commission was bipartisan.) [23]

When the left-wing group United to Protect Democracy sued the commission in late 2017 for attempting to gather voter information from the states, McReynolds provided sworn testimony alleging that the commission had caused Denver voter registration withdrawals to surge. [24]

McReynolds left the Denver Elections Division in 2018. She was then considered a potential “political up-and-comer” in Democratic politics if she decided to seek elected office. According to the Denver Post, McReynolds was also considering running for clerk and recorder, the elected office that oversees the Denver Elections Division. McReynolds told the outlet that she planned to stay in Denver and was still mulling a run for office. One outlet reported that she was “well down the path of discussions to determine if she should challenge incumbent Secretary of State Wayne Williams,” a Republican, though she ultimately decided not to seek public office. [25] [26]

National Vote at Home Institute and Coalition

Background, Left-Wing Associations, and Leadership

Also see National Vote at Home Institute and Coalition (Nonprofit)

In August 2018, McReynolds instead became executive director of the National Vote at Home Institute and the National Vote at Home Coalition, based in Washington, D.C. [27]

Both groups were formed in 2017 with seed capital from the National Association of Letter Carriers, the labor union whose members include U.S. Postal Service employees, which hosted the Vote at Home kick-off event in December 2017 at its headquarters in Washington, D.C. The event was attended by AFL-CIO president Richard Trumka and Sen. Ron Wyden (D-OR), the first federal officeholder elected in an all-mail election in 1996. [28] [29]

Also present at the kick-off was then-Oregon Secretary of State Phil Keisling, a National Vote at Home Institute/Coalition board member, who told the audience: [30]

Imagine a state where voters never have to show a photo ID; wait in voting lines; leave home or work early to get to their designated polling place; or worry about bad weather, traffic jams, finding parking or public transportation, or arranging childcare.

AVR’s [automatic voter registration] underlying policy premise is identical to vote-at home’s; if the government knows you’re a citizen, you become a registered voter [emphasis added].

National Vote at Home Institute’s board of directors also includes Brian Renfroe, executive vice president of the National Association of Letter Carriers; Emily Persaud-Zamora, director of the Nevada affiliate of the left-leaning get-out-the-vote group State Voices; Ben Jealous, president of the judicial activist group People for the American Way and a 2018 Democratic gubernatorial candidate in Maryland; and Stephen Silberstein, a Democratic mega-donor and board member for the anti-Electoral College group National Popular Vote whose philanthropy, the Silberstein Foundation, has donated at least $425,000 to the National Vote at Home Institute since 2018. [31] [32]

Vote at Home’s advisory board also includes numerous Democrats and representatives from left-wing activist and election “reform” groups, including: [33]

Activism Under McReynolds

According to TIME, McReynolds and the National Vote at Home Institute and Coalition played a key role in organizing vote-by-mail efforts for the 2020 presidential election. In March 2020, McReynolds published the first-ever national mail-in voting proposal, which brought her and the Institute national exposure. [34]

As the election drew closer, the Institute gave various secretaries of state “from both parties technical advice on everything from which vendors to use to how to locate drop boxes” and “communications tool kits.” In private calls with left-of-center activists, McReynolds encouraged the use of absentee voting for shortening lines at polling places. [35] In this role, McReynolds became an active participant in longtime AFL-CIO political director Michael Podhorzer’s election strategy calls, considered to be ”the galactic center for a constellation of operatives across the left.” [36]

The National Vote at Home Coalition hired “state leads” to operate primarily in key battleground states, information that was later scrubbed from its website in early 2021: [37]

While little information is available about most of these “state leads,” at least two—Lindsey Joseph in Ohio and Jacob Panfel in Georgia—coordinated their efforts with the Leadership Now Project, a partisan group formed by former Obama administration staffers to mislead conservatives in these states into supporting left-wing redistricting and vote-by-mail “reforms” in a coalition called Fix the System. Fix the System was run by Nilmini Rubin, who now runs public policy affairs for the Facebook (now called Meta). [38]

In Wisconsin, Vote at Home state lead Michael Spitzer-Rubinstein, an attorney, was accused of taking over Green Bay’s election as the city’s “de facto elections administrator,” according to a later investigation by Wisconsin Spotlight. [39]  Email chains revealed Green Bay’s Democratic major, Eric Genrich, “usurping” the city clerk’s authority over election administration and giving it to the Vote at Home crew, placing the state’s 3rd-largest election in the hands of private, partisan actors. Spitzer-Rubinstein reportedly controlled 4 of the 5 keys to the room where local ballots were stored and counted, had access to absentee ballots days before the 2020 election, and asked the county clerk if he and his team could “cure” faulty absentee ballots as they’d done in Milwaukee. In the county clerk’s words, Green Bay “went rogue” under Vote at Home and its Democratic allies. [40]

Vote at Home also launched a Wisconsin “communications toolkit” in August 2020 “to support outreach around absentee voting” in coordination with an allied left-wing election “reform” group, the Center for Civic Design, which reportedly “share[d] research insights about how to engage people who might not trust the vote by mail process.” [41]

U.S. Postal Service Board of Governors

Nomination and Confirmation (2021)

In early 2021, McReynolds was one of three nominees appointed by President Joe Biden to the United States Postal Service board of governors, which oversees the operations of the country’s mail-delivery service. A White House press release touted McReynolds as “a leading expert on election administration and policy.” [42]

She was confirmed in May 2021 by a vote of 59 to 38 in the U.S. Senate. [43]

Hidden Partisanship

Critically, Biden nominated McReynolds to the board of governors as an “independent.” By law, the 9-person U.S. Postal Service board of governors may only contain a maximum of 5 members from either major political party so as to prevent a supermajority. [44]

Critics have pointed out that nominating McReynolds as an “independent” freed up a Democratic seat for a future appointment under the Biden administration, creating an illegal, albeit unofficial, supermajority on the board of governors. [45]

Conservative critics have also argued that McReynolds should be considered a Democrat, in keeping with the board of governors partisan restrictions, due to her extensive connections to partisan Democratic and liberal activist groups, including the National Vote at Home Coalition. McReynolds was a registered Democrat in the 2009-2010 election cycle. [46] She was also an advisor to the Election Validation Project, a campaign by Pierre Omidyar’s Democracy Fund to advise public officials on conducting election audits. The project is headed by Jennifer Morrell, an ex-Colorado elections official on National Vote at Home Institute’s advisory board who also runs the Elections Group, a liberal group which provides consulting services to officials on implementing mail-in ballots. [47]

Just 10 days prior to McReynolds’ appointment to the board of governors in February 2021, the National Vote at Home Institute’s website showed a list of partners, almost all of them left-wing political groups. By March, the list had been scrubbed from Vote at Home’s website. Those organizations included: [48]

Partisan Activism

Democracy Alliance

Also see Democracy Alliance (Nonprofit) and Democracy Alliance Conferences

In Fall 2018, McReynolds was invited to speak on a panel at the regular meeting of the Democracy Alliance, a convening of top left-of-center donors, activists, Democratic strategists, and special interests who meet to plan the funding of political groups ahead of elections. While it’s unclear which topic McReynolds spoke on, her co-panelists included Black Lives Matter co-founder and “trained Marxist” Alicia Garza; then-Leadership Conference president Vanita Gupta, now Associate Attorney General in the Biden administration’s Department of Justice; and a representative of the voter turnout group For Freedoms. [49]

2020 Election

During the 2020 election, McReynolds provided consulting to various state- and county-level governments on implementing mail-in ballots.

In a report sent to the Board of Commissioners in DeKalb County, Georgia, in May 2020, McReynolds called for “purchas[ing] and install[ing] a modern, updated security system with badge access, control logs, and remotely accessed cameras” and “adding cameras to all work areas that can be accessed by appropriate management staff.” [50]

McReynolds also urged California to implement similar measures. California Secretary of State Alex Padilla praised McReynolds and her colleagues, saying that “their expertise will be invaluable as we work together to meet this moment and keep elections running smoothly during this challenging time.” [51]

Time magazine reported that McReynolds maintained regular correspondence with Georgia Secretary of State Brad Raffensperger’s office during the 2020 election. [52] The state of Georgia has since adopted several of Vote at Home’s key recommendations, including “a new online portal for voters to request absentee ballots, expanded absentee ballot drop boxes, ballot tracking so that voters can follow their ballot’s progress and, crucially, a rule change that allowed county election workers to begin processing absentee ballots 15 days before Election Day.” [53]

Association with Dominion Voting Systems

In May 2015, McReynolds oversaw Denver’s adoption of Dominion Voting Systems, lauding the system in a presentation before election officials. [54] The Brennan Center for Justice, which supports left-leaning election “reforms,” profiled Denver’s adoption of Dominion in a 2015 case study, noting that it was designed to promote vote-by-mail since 95 percent of Denver voters already cast their vote by mail under Colorado’s all-mail election system, implemented under McReynolds’ tenure in 2013. [55]

After the 2020 election revealed widespread election irregularities, Dominion Voting Systems came under suspicion by critics for allegedly enabling fraud and illegal ballots in key battleground states like Georgia. Days after the 2020 election, McReynolds defended Dominion against claims of ballot fraud, tweeting: [56]

No, Dominion voting machines did not cause widespread voting problems. Don’t be fooled by conspiracies & disinformation. Instead rely on trusted sources of information like election officials.

References

  1. “Biden’s Postal Board and the Future of Elections: Amber McReynolds.” American Accountability Foundation. April 22, 2021. Accessed May 5, 2022. https://www.bidennoms.com/news/477/biden-elections-postal-board-amber-mcreynolds ^
  2. “About Us.” Vote At Home. Accessed March 15, 2020. https://www.voteathome.org/about/ ^
  3. Esteban L. Hernandez. “Amber McReynolds, Denver’s director of elections, is leaving her post to advocate for Colorado-style voting in other states.” Denverite. July 26, 2018. Accessed May 5, 2022. https://denverite.com/2018/07/26/denver-director-of-elections-amber-mcreynolds-leaving-post-for-nonprofit/ ^
  4. Ball, M. (2021, February 04). The secret Bipartisan campaign that saved the 2020 Election. Retrieved February 11, 2021, from https://time.com/5936036/secret-2020-election-campaign/ ^
  5. Christina A. Cassidy. “AP Interview: Disinformation concerns mail voting expert.” Associated Press. May 19, 2021. Accessed May 5, 2022. https://apnews.com/article/donald-trump-election-2020-business-health-coronavirus-pandemic-a2be8192a1515962660f9cde7af1fd09 ^
  6. Christina A. Cassidy. “AP Interview: Disinformation concerns mail voting expert.” Associated Press. May 19, 2021. Accessed May 5, 2022. https://apnews.com/article/donald-trump-election-2020-business-health-coronavirus-pandemic-a2be8192a1515962660f9cde7af1fd09 ^
  7. Abrams, A. (2020, October 20). Amber McReynolds is helping the COUNTRY Vote-by-mail in 2020. Retrieved February 11, 2021, from https://time.com/5901694/amber-mcreynolds-vote-by-mail-2020-election/ ; Wethersfield grad makes ‘top 10’ list in Denver. (2012, March 14). Retrieved February 11, 2021, from https://www.starcourier.com/article/20120314/NEWS/303149841 ^
  8. Hammer, L. (2020, August 26). Dana McReynolds appointed to fill RESIDENT circuit judgeship. Retrieved February 11, 2021, from https://qctimes.com/news/local/dana-mcreynolds-appointed-to-fill-resident-circuit-judgeship/article_b314dfb0-4a9d-52cc-9725-a45e27dce786.html ^
  9. Meet Amber McReynolds – VOYAGEDENVER – Denver. (2019, July 29). Retrieved February 11, 2021, from http://voyagedenver.com/interview/meet-amber-mcreynolds/ ^
  10. Meet Amber McReynolds – VOYAGEDENVER – Denver. (2019, July 29). Retrieved February 11, 2021, from http://voyagedenver.com/interview/meet-amber-mcreynolds/ ^
  11. Hayden Ludwig and Michael Watson. “Secrets of the Public Interest Pyramid: The Left’s Silent Partner.” Capital Research Center. February 21, 2019. Accessed May 5, 2022. https://capitalresearch.org/article/secrets-of-the-public-interest-pyramid-part-1/ ^
  12. Ludwig, H. (2018, October 05). MASSPIRG: The LEFT-WING LEVIATHAN. Retrieved February 11, 2021, from https://capitalresearch.org/article/masspirg-the-left-wind-leviathan/ ; “Tides Foundation List of Grantees 2010.” docshare.tips, March 2017. http://docshare.tips/tides-foundation-list-of-grantees-2010_58bc1cceb6d87fc50d8b4ad0.html. ^
  13. Janny Scott. “Obama’s Account of New York Years Often Differs From What Others Say.” New York Times. October 30, 2007. Accessed May 5, 2022. https://www.nytimes.com/2007/10/30/us/politics/30obama.html ^
  14. The Public Interest Network Newsletter. Winter 2019. Accessed May 5, 2022. https://alumni.webaction.org/p/salsa/web/common/public/content?content_item_KEY=10662 ^
  15. Meet Amber McReynolds – VOYAGEDENVER – Denver. (2019, July 29). Retrieved February 11, 2021, from http://voyagedenver.com/interview/meet-amber-mcreynolds/ ^
  16. Meet Amber McReynolds – VOYAGEDENVER – Denver. (2019, July 29). Retrieved February 11, 2021, from http://voyagedenver.com/interview/meet-amber-mcreynolds/ ^
  17. Meet Amber McReynolds – VOYAGEDENVER – Denver. (2019, July 29). Retrieved February 11, 2021, from http://voyagedenver.com/interview/meet-amber-mcreynolds/ ^
  18. Wethersfield grad makes ‘top 10’ list in Denver. (2012, March 14). Retrieved February 11, 2021, from https://www.starcourier.com/article/20120314/NEWS/303149841 ^
  19. Njegomir, D. (2018, December 18). Q&A with amber McReynolds: Denver’s ELECTIONS Maven GOES NATIONWIDE. Retrieved February 11, 2021, from https://www.coloradopolitics.com/news/q-a-with-amber-mcreynolds-denver-s-elections-maven-goes-nationwide/article_60037820-0942-11e9-a09b-3f9e0419dbf8.html ^
  20. Voting outside the Polling Place: Absentee, All-Mail and other voting at home options. (n.d.). Retrieved February 11, 2021, from https://www.ncsl.org/research/elections-and-campaigns/absentee-and-early-voting.aspx ; Lee, K., & Bunch, J. (2013, May 02). Colorado Senate oks MAIL-BALLOT voting, as GOP Maintains Fraud concern. Retrieved February 11, 2021, from https://www.denverpost.com/2013/05/02/colorado-senate-oks-mail-ballot-voting-as-gop-maintains-fraud-concern/ ^
  21. Lee, K., & Bunch, J. (2013, May 02). Colorado Senate oks MAIL-BALLOT voting, as GOP Maintains Fraud concern.  Retrieved February 11, 2021, from https://www.denverpost.com/2013/05/02/colorado-senate-oks-mail-ballot-voting-as-gop-maintains-fraud-concern/ ^
  22. “BLISSFUL IGNORANCE: Denver Elections Director Doesn’t Know What an Illegal Vote Is.” Colorado Peak Politics. March 6, 2013. Accessed May 5, 2022. https://coloradopeakpolitics.com/2013/03/06/blissful-ignorance-denver-elections-director-doesnt-know-what-an-illegal-vote-is/ ^
  23. Amber McReynolds. “Trump’s voter commission is frightening away Denver voters.” The Denver Post. July 10, 2017. Accessed May 5, 2022. Archived: https://capitalresearch.org/app/uploads/amber-mcreynolds-trump-frightening-away-denver-voters.pdf ^
  24. United to Protect Democracy v. Presidential Advisory Commission on Election Integrity. November 2017. Archived: https://capitalresearch.org/app/uploads/Protect-Democracy-v-Commission-McReynolds-declaration-112017.pdf ^
  25. Bunch, J. (2018, July 18). Rising political star Amber McReynolds leaving DENVER Elections post. Retrieved February 11, 2021, from https://www.coloradopolitics.com/hot-sheet/rising-political-star-amber-mcreynolds-leaving-denver-elections-post/article_7c71d125-c747-5d76-835a-d56112de7cf1.html ^
  26. Skilling, C. (2018, July 31). Denver director of elections Amber Mcreynolds to step down. Retrieved February 11, 2021, from https://www.denverpost.com/2018/07/27/denver-elections-director-stepping-down/ ^
  27. Skilling, C. (2018, July 31). Denver director of elections Amber Mcreynolds to step down. Retrieved February 11, 2021, from https://www.denverpost.com/2018/07/27/denver-elections-director-stepping-down/ ^
  28. Ron Wyden. “Oregon has used vote by mail since electing me in 1996. Those who say it can’t work are lying.” NBC News. April 30, 2020. Accessed May 6, 2022. https://www.nbcnews.com/think/opinion/oregon-has-used-vote-mail-electing-me-1996-those-who-ncna1195646 ^
  29. “Reimagining the ballot to ‘Vote at Home.’” National Vote at Home Coalition. Dec. 2017. Accessed May 6, 2022. Archived: https://www.influencewatch.org/app/uploads/2021/06/Vote-At-Home.-Reimagining-the-Ballot-2017-NALC.pdf ^
  30. “Reimagining the ballot to ‘Vote at Home.’” National Vote at Home Coalition. Dec. 2017. Accessed May 6, 2022. Archived: https://www.influencewatch.org/app/uploads/2021/06/Vote-At-Home.-Reimagining-the-Ballot-2017-NALC.pdf ^
  31. Data provided by FoundationSearch. Search conducted May 1, 2022. www.FoundationSearch.org ^
  32. “About Us: Board of Directors.” National Vote at Home Institute. Accessed May 6, 2022. Original URL: https://voteathome.org/about-us/. Archived: https://www.influencewatch.org/app/uploads/2022/05/vote-at-home-institute-board-of-directors.pdf ^
  33. “About Us: Board of Directors.” National Vote at Home Institute. Accessed May 6, 2022. Original URL: https://voteathome.org/about-us/. Archived: https://www.influencewatch.org/app/uploads/2022/05/vote-at-home-institute-board-of-directors.pdf ^
  34. Abrams, A. (2020, October 20). Amber McReynolds is helping the COUNTRY Vote-by-mail in 2020. Retrieved February 11, 2021, from https://time.com/5901694/amber-mcreynolds-vote-by-mail-2020-election/ ^
  35. Ball, M. (2021, February 04). The secret Bipartisan campaign that saved the 2020 Election. Retrieved February 11, 2021, from https://time.com/5936036/secret-2020-election-campaign/ ^
  36. Ball, M. (2021, February 04). The secret Bipartisan campaign that saved the 2020 Election. Retrieved February 11, 2021, from https://time.com/5936036/secret-2020-election-campaign/ ^
  37. “State Leads.” National Vote at Home Coalition. Archived Webpage. Accessed May 6, 2022. https://capitalresearch.org/app/uploads/vote-at-home-institute-state-leads-2020.png ^
  38. “New coalition will push democracy reforms targeted to center and right.” The Fulcrum. March 26, 2020. Accessed May 6, 2022. https://thefulcrum.us/big-picture/fix-the-system ^
  39. M.D. Kittle. “SPECIAL INVESTIGATION: INFILTRATING THE ELECTION.” Wisconsin Spotlight. Mar. 9, 2021. Accessed May 6, 2022. https://wisconsinspotlight.com/special-investigation-infiltrating-the-election/ ^
  40. M.D. Kittle. “SPECIAL INVESTIGATION: INFILTRATING THE ELECTION.” Wisconsin Spotlight. Mar. 9, 2021. Accessed May 6, 2022. https://wisconsinspotlight.com/special-investigation-infiltrating-the-election/ ^
  41. “Office of the Special Counsel: Second Interim Investigative Report on the Apparatus & Procedures of the Wisconsin Elections System.” Wisconsin State Legislature. Mar. 1, 2022. Accessed May 6, 2022. https://legis.wisconsin.gov/assembly/22/brandtjen/media/1552/osc-second-interim-report.pdf ^
  42. “President Biden Announces Nominees for the United States Postal Service Board of Governors.” The White House. The United States Government, February 27, 2021. https://www.whitehouse.gov/briefing-room/statements-releases/2021/02/24/president-biden-announces-nominees-for-the-united-states-postal-service-board-of-governors-2/. ^
  43. PN244 — Amber Faye McReynolds — United States Postal Service. 117th Congress. Accessed May 6, 2022. https://www.congress.gov/nomination/117th-congress/244 ^
  44. 39 U.S. Code § 202 – Board of Governors. Legal Information Institute. Accessed May 6, 2022. https://www.law.cornell.edu/uscode/text/39/202 ^
  45. Susan Ferrechio. “Conservative group says ‘independent’ postal board nominee is really a Democrat.” Washington Examiner. April 22, 2021. Accessed May 6, 2022. https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/news/congress/conservative-group-questions-independent-biden-postal-board-nominee ^
  46. Susan Ferrechio. “Conservative group says ‘independent’ postal board nominee is really a Democrat.” Washington Examiner. April 22, 2021. Accessed May 6, 2022. https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/news/congress/conservative-group-questions-independent-biden-postal-board-nominee ^
  47. “Focus Area: Trust In Elections.” Democracy Fund. May 22, 2020. Accessed May 6, 2022. https://democracyfund.org/focus_area/trust-in-elections/ ^
  48. “About Us.” National Vote at Home Institute. Archived from February 2021. Accessed May 6, 2022. Archived: https://web.archive.org/web/20210214234833/https:/voteathome.org/about-us/ ^
  49. “Democracy Alliance, Full Fall 2018 Agenda.” Scribd, via Washington Free Beacon. Archived: https://www.scribd.com/document/393377199/Democracy-Alliance-Full-Fall-2018-Agenda ^
  50. Amber McReynolds, Jennifer Morrell, Noah Praetz. “Recommendations: DeKalb County Voter Registration & Elections.” DeKalb County Board of County Commissioners. May 29, 2020. Accessed July 6, 2021. https://www.dekalbcountyga.gov/sites/default/files/Election%20Group%20DeKalb%20Final%20Report-April%202020.pdf ^
  51. “Secretary of State’s Office Bringing on Expert Consultants to Help with Vote-by-Mail Expansion for General Election.” AP20:046 SOS Office Bringing on Expert Consultants to help with VBM Expansion for General Election :: California Secretary of State. Accessed June 24, 2021. https://www.sos.ca.gov/administration/news-releases-and-advisories/2020-news-releases-and-advisories/ap20046-sos-office-bringing-expert-consultants-help-vote-mail-expansion-general-election. ^
  52. Abrams, Abigail. “Amber McReynolds Is Helping the Country Vote-By-Mail in 2020.” Time. Time, October 20, 2020. https://time.com/5901694/amber-mcreynolds-vote-by-mail-2020-election/. ^
  53. Abrams, Abigail. “Amber McReynolds Is Helping the Country Vote-By-Mail in 2020.” Time. Time, October 20, 2020. https://time.com/5901694/amber-mcreynolds-vote-by-mail-2020-election/. ^
  54. “Secretary of State Wayne Williams looks to Dominion after nearly three years of study on voting systems.” Colorado Secretary of State. December 22, 2015. Accessed May 5, 2022. https://www.sos.state.co.us/pubs/newsRoom/pressReleases/2015/PR20151222Dominion.html ^
  55. Lawrence Norden and Christopher Famighetti. “America’s Voting Machines at Risk.” Brennan Center for Justice. 2015. Accessed May 2022. Archived: https://capitalresearch.org/app/uploads/Americas_Voting_Machines_At_Risk.pdf ^
  56. Amber McReynolds. Tweet. Nov. 12, 2020. Accessed May 5, 2022. Archived: https://capitalresearch.org/app/uploads/amber-mcreynolds-dominion-tweet-2020.png ^

Connected Organizations

  1. Biden Administration – Independent Agencies (Government Agency)
    Member of USPS Board of Governors
  2. FairVote (Non-profit)
    Senior Policy Advisors (2022-Present)
  3. Issue One (Non-profit)
    Senior Political Strategist (2022-Present)
  4. Issue One Action (Non-profit)
    Senior Political Strategist (2022-Present)
  5. National Vote at Home Coalition (Non-profit)
    Former CEO (2018-2021)
  6. National Vote at Home Institute (Non-profit)
    Former CEO (2018-2021)
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