Non-profit

Transgender Law Center

Official logo of Transgender Law Center, adopted 2012 (link)
Website:

transgenderlawcenter.org/

Location:

OAKLAND, CA

Tax ID:

05-0544006

Tax-Exempt Status:

501(c)(3)

Budget (2017):

Revenue: $5,296,603
Expenses: $3,864,820
Assets: $3,529,410

Executive Director:

Kris Hayashi

Formation:

2002

Type:

Transgender legal center

The Transgender Law Center (TLC) is a national social-liberal legal center which advocates for the interests of transgender and gender non-conforming individuals and is almost entirely operated by such individuals. TLC was founded in 2002 by Chris Daley and Dylan Vade as a project of the National Center for Lesbian Rights. In 2004, TLC spun off as an independent non-profit.

TLC is best known for the cases, Quine v. Beard, which granted the right of California inmates to be imprisoned according to their chosen gender, and Whitaker v. Kenosha Unified School District, which put transgender individuals under Title IX.

TLC sued the administration of President Donald Trump for removing an anti-discrimination clause from Obamacare.

Agenda

The Transgender Law Center is in the process of designing what it has titled the “Trans Agenda,” which outlines far-left social and policy goals for the transgender community based on intersectional principles. From what has been written, the Agenda appears to support more government intervention in health care access, more liberal immigration policies, and legal protection for sex workers. [1][2]

The Agenda especially focuses on racial minority transgender individuals. One of the top priorities is reducing violence towards trans black people. TLC defines violence beyond physical coercion, including assigning gender at birth, discrimination, assuming conventional gender norms, and systematic social oppression. The Agenda seeks more racial minority trans people in positions of power, the confirmation of chosen gender and names by government agencies (such as state Departments of Motor Vehicles), restorative justice policies, the counting of black trans individuals in the U.S. Census, and the elimination of pre-trial incarceration. [3]

Programs

Black Trans Circles

In 2018, the Transgender Law Center established Black Trans Circles with funding provided by the Open Society Foundations, the grantmaking network of George Soros. Black Trans Circles provides support for Black trans individuals, a group which the Transgender Law Center claims faces disproportionately high discrimination and violence within the LGBT community. [4]

Disability Project

In 2019, TLC began the Disability Project under the leadership of Sebastian Margaret, who had received a Soros Justice Fellowship grant from George Soros. The Disability Project engages in community organizing with disabled LGBT individuals. [5]

[email protected]

In 2014, TLC formed [email protected] in conjunction with Southerners on New Ground, an LGBT advocacy group focused on the Southeastern United States. In 2019, [email protected] produced the Grapevine Report, a survey of Southern transgender individuals which found that 72% of respondents made less than $45,000 per year, 12% were currently or formerly incarcerated, and 15% were HIV-positive. [6]

Major Cases

Quine v. Beard

In 2014, the Transgender Law Center filed a suit against the California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation (CDCR) on behalf of Shiloh Quine, a transgender woman held in a men’s prison. Shiloh had asked to be transferred to a women’s prison, to be given women’s clothes, and to be permitted to commence with gender-reassignment surgery. All requests were denied. TLC argued that the CDCR’s restrictions constituted cruel and unusual punishment, and therefore violated the 8th Amendment. [7]

In 2015, the CDCR agreed to permit Shiloh’s gender reassignment surgery and then move her to a women’s prison. The case has set a precedent in California to allow transgender individuals to be imprisoned according to their chosen gender,[8] and for sexual reassignment surgery to be considered a medical necessity by the state government. [9]

Whitaker v. Kenosha Unified School District

In 2016, TLC filed a suit against the Kenosha Unified School District on behalf of Ash Whitaker, a transgender male student who alleged that his high school was engaging in discriminatory and abusive behavior toward him. Whitaker claimed that he had been denied access to the men’s restroom, had been consistently referred to by his old female name by teachers (a practice condemned by transgender activists as “deadnaming”), and that the school administration had suggested forcing transgender students to wear bright green wristbands to monitor their bathroom use. [10]

A federal court ruled in favor of Ash. The school district appealed the case to the Seventh Circuit Court of Appeals which confirmed the ruling. The case set a federal precedent that transgender individuals are protected under Title IX and the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment. [11]

HHS Lawsuit

In July 2020, TLC sued the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services over the Trump administration’s rule that removed non-discrimination protection from the Affordable Care Act (Obamacare). TLC’s lawsuit is cosigned by the Campaign for Southern Equality, the National Women’s Law Center (NWLC), the Transgender Legal Defense & Education Fund (TLDEF), the Center for Health Law and Policy Innovation (CHLPI) of Harvard Law School, and law firm Hogan Lovells. The lawsuit is arguing that the removal of the clause violates the recent Bostock v. Clayton County ruling that prohibits firing employees on the basis of sexual orientation or gender identity. [12]

Leadership

Kris Hayashi

Kris Hayashi is the executive director of the Transgender Law Center and is a long-time LGBT activist. After graduating from Stanford University, Hayashi became executive director of the California-based Youth United for Community Action, a progressive advocacy group run by young racial minorities. He left the organization seven years later to work at the Western States Center, a left-wing Portland-based community organizing group. In 2003, Hayashi became executive director of the Audre Lorde Project, a community organizing group in New York City for LGBT individuals. Hayashi left in 2013 to join TLC. [13][14]

Masen Davis

Masen Davis worked as executive director of TLC from 2007 to 2015 and has a long career in LGBT advocacy and fundraising. Prior to TLC, Davis worked as a community investment officer and director of development for United Way of Greater Los Angeles. After working at TLC for over 7.5 years, Davis became interim co-director of Global Acton for Trans Equality (GATE). He then operated as an independent nonprofit consultant for almost three years before working for short periods at the Gill Foundation, Freedom for All Americans, and Out & Equal. He is currently the interim executive director of Transgender Europe. [15]

Funding

The Transgender Law Center is funded by numerous left-of-center nonprofits. It has received grants consistently from Borealis Philanthropy since at least 2016. [16] Since 2010, TLC has received $1,216,500 from the Evelyn and Walter Haas Jr. Fund. [17] In 2016, the Arcus Foundation donated to TLC. [18] George Soros’s Open Society Foundations have also contributed to TLC. [19]

Expenditures

Grant Writing

In 2018, the Transgender Law Center paid $3,244,601 to Leslie Ann Minot for “grant writing.” The sum amounted to almost three-quarters of the organization’s entire expenditure for the year. [20] Minot was a development director of Outright Action International in the early 2000s and has been a freelance writer for the last 22 years. [21]

Lobbying

From 2015-2018, the Transgender Law Center spent $1.3 million on lobbying. [22]

References

  1. “Trans Agenda.” Transgender Law Center. Accessed October 1, 2020. https://transgenderlawcenter.org/trans-agenda-for-liberation. ^
  2. “Black Trans Women and Black Trans Femmes: Leading & Living Fiercely.” Transgender Law Center. Accessed October 1, 2020. https://transgenderlawcenter.org/black-trans-women-black-trans-femmes-leading-living-fiercely. ^
  3. “Black Trans Women and Black Trans Femmes: Leading & Living Fiercely.” Transgender Law Center. Accessed October 1, 2020. https://transgenderlawcenter.org/black-trans-women-black-trans-femmes-leading-living-fiercely. ^
  4. “Black Trans Circles.” Transgender Law Center. Accessed October 1, 2020. https://transgenderlawcenter.org/programs/black-trans-circles. ^
  5. “Disability Project.” Transgender Law Center. Accessed October 1, 2020. https://transgenderlawcenter.org/programs/disability-project. ^
  6. [email protected]” Transgender Law Center. Accessed October 1, 2020. https://transgenderlawcenter.org/programs/tlcsong. ^
  7. “Quine vs. Beard.” Transgender Law Center. Accessed October 1, 2020. https://transgenderlawcenter.org/quine-v-beard. ^
  8. “Quine vs. Beard.” Transgender Law Center. Accessed October 1, 2020. https://transgenderlawcenter.org/quine-v-beard. ^
  9. “Quine v. Beard.” Transgender Law Center. Accessed October 1, 2020. https://transgenderlawcenter.org/archives/case/quine-v-beard. ^
  10. “Whitaker v. Kenosha.” Transgender Law Center. Accessed October 1, 2020. https://transgenderlawcenter.org/legal/youth/whitaker. ^
  11. “Whitaker v. Kenosha.” Transgender Law Center. Accessed October 1, 2020. https://transgenderlawcenter.org/legal/youth/whitaker. ^
  12. Polaski, Adam. “New Lawsuit Against Trump Anti-Transgender Healthcare Rollback Rule Filed by Civil Rights Orgs, Representing Campaign for Southern Equality, Others.” Campaign for Southern Equality. July 9, 2020. Accessed October 1, 2020. https://southernequality.org/new-lawsuit-against-trump-anti-transgender-healthcare-rollback-rule-filed-by-civil-rights-orgs-representing-campaign-for-southern-equality-and-others/. ^
  13. “Kris Hayashi.” Transgender Law Center. Accessed October 1, 2020. https://transgenderlawcenter.org/about/staff-and-board/kris-hayashi. ^
  14. “Kris Hayashi.” LinkedIn. Accessed October 1, 2020. https://www.linkedin.com/in/kris-hayashi-365891111/. ^
  15. “Masen Davis.” LinkedIn. Accessed October 1, 2020. https://www.linkedin.com/in/masen/. ^
  16. “Grantee Profile.” Borealis Philanthropy. Accessed October 1, 2020. https://borealisphilanthropy.org/grantee/transgender-law-center/. ^
  17. “Transgender Law Center.” Evelyn and Walter Haas Jr. Fund. Accessed October 1, 2020. https://www.haasjr.org/grants/grantee/transgender-law-center. ^
  18. “Arcus Fall 2016 Grants Target Transgender Justice, Culture Change.” Arcus Foundation. October 12, 2016. Accessed October 1, 2020. https://www.arcusfoundation.org/arcus-fall-2016-grants-target-transgender-justice-culture-change/. ^
  19. “Black Trans Circles.” Transgender Law Center. Accessed October 1, 2020. https://transgenderlawcenter.org/programs/black-trans-circles. ^
  20. “Transgender Law Center Form 990.” Pro Publica. Accessed October 1, 2020. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/display_990/50544006/02_2020_prefixes_05-13%2F050544006_201812_990_2020021317146147. ^
  21. “Leslie Minot.” LinkedIn. Accessed October 1, 2020. https://www.linkedin.com/in/leslie-minot-07661111/. ^
  22. “Transgender Law Center Form 990.” Pro Publica. Accessed October 1, 2020. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/display_990/50544006/02_2020_prefixes_05-13%2F050544006_201812_990_2020021317146147. ^

Coalition Memberships

  1. Alliance for Justice (AFJ)
  See an error? Let us know!

Nonprofit Information

  • Accounting Period: December - November
  • Tax Exemption Received: February 1, 2005

  • Available Filings

    Period Form Type Total revenue Total functional expenses Total assets (EOY) Total liabilities (EOY) Unrelated business income? Total contributions Program service revenue Investment income Comp. of current officers, directors, etc. Form 990
    2017 Dec Form 990 $5,296,603 $3,864,820 $3,529,410 $348,236 N $4,842,549 $222,426 $143,204 $206,613 PDF
    2016 Dec Form 990 $3,063,920 $3,341,762 $2,038,983 $289,592 N $2,870,196 $196,045 $23,364 $196,435 PDF
    2015 Dec Form 990 $2,443,411 $2,235,423 $2,205,817 $235,009 N $2,411,801 $16,702 $22,460 $159,926 PDF
    2014 Dec Form 990 $1,733,740 $1,565,155 $1,944,950 $182,535 N $1,647,364 $76,536 $19,606 $169,247 PDF
    2013 Dec Form 990 $1,659,046 $1,398,536 $1,686,377 $138,795 N $1,560,419 $86,427 $13,298 $110,038 PDF
    2012 Dec Form 990 $1,270,017 $1,289,174 $1,512,630 $150,558 N $1,181,268 $50,486 $26,032 $96,628 PDF
    2011 Dec Form 990 $1,567,595 $1,001,334 $1,460,868 $79,639 N $1,509,539 $35,558 $14,854 $86,046 PDF

    Additional Filings (PDFs)

    Transgender Law Center

    1629 TELEGRAPH AVE STE 400
    OAKLAND, CA 94612-2114