Non-profit

National Propane Gas Association (NPGA)

Location:

Washington, DC

Tax ID:

36-2087363

Tax-Exempt Status:

501(c)(6)

Budget (2020):

Revenue: $9,082,313
Expenses: $7,690,596
Assets: $11,436,335

Type:

Nonprofit propane policy corporation

Founded:

1938

President and CEO:

Stephen Kaminski

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National Propane Gas Association (NPGA) is the trade association representing the propane gas industry including producers, retailers, and transporters. NPGA works to promote safety and standards in the industry and works with state legislatures and regulators on bills and new guidelines. In its educational efforts, National Propane Gas Association holds that propane, while being a hydrocarbon, is cleaner than other hydrocarbons, contributes significantly to the growth of the economy, and can be used with targeted high-energy draining appliances to complement weather-dependent wind and solar energy.

History

National Propane Gas Association was formed in 1931 as the National Bottled Gas Association. 1 In 1937 the organization changed its name to “Liquified Petroleum Gas Association” and changed again in 1946 to the “National LP-Gas Association.” 2 NPGA changed to its current name of “National Propane Gas Association” in 1988. 3 NPGA currently has over 2,400 members in the U.S. and internationally. 4

National Propane Gas Association represents all segments of the propane gas industry including small businesses, large corporations engaged in retail operations and marketing, propone producers and wholesalers, propane appliance producers, manufacturers of propane tanks, and propane transporters. 5

Programs

National Propane Gas Association seeks to advance safety throughout the propane industry; to achieve public policies that enable the production, distribution and use of propane; and to foster industry-wide collaboration through communication, learning, and cohesion. 6 NPGA works with federal regulators, develops uniform codes and standards, educates stakeholders on propane and its value as the energy of the future, and hosts meetings to network, educate, and promote new equipment and services. 7

NPGA advocates for the industry on the state and federal level through advocacy through its PropanePAC. 8

National Propane Gas Association hosts online training courses for members on assisting new employees obtain commercial driver’s licenses and hazmat certifications, briefings on new federal regulations, and conducts an apprenticeship program to work with business to train new workers. 9 NPGA also runs a foundation scholarship fund that in 2021 provided $136,000 to 101 students to attend vocational training, college, or technical schools. 10 NPGA also hosts an annual exposition with educational and technical sessions and presents industry awards. 11

National Propane Gas Association has three business councils focusing on specific issues open to all members and certain non-members. 12 NPGA has a council on women in propane seeking to promote the advancement of women in the industry, a benchmarking council that is a collaboration of propane marketers to share ideas and insights for marketing and best practices, and the cylinder exchange council that focuses on laws and regulations for exchanging containers and codes and standards. 13

Policies

National Propane Gas Association cites the economic impact of propane, stating it is used in 50 million American homes, it is used for space or water heating in 11.9 million households, and serves 1.1 million commercial customers, 505,000 agricultural accounts, and 185,000 industrial accounts. 14 NPGA claims that the propane industry employs 57,000 American workers and generates $46 billion annually in direct economic impact. 15

National Propane Gas Association argues propane is a safe form of energy because it evaporates in the air, does not harm the soil, and has a negligible effect on the ozone layer. 16 NPGA notes that propane is better for the environment because it replaces the wood and coal fuels. 17 NPGA states a targeted use of propane in a house is cleaner energy than electric and when used with wind and solar power can be effective due to appliances such as heaters, stoves, clothes dryers, or other high-heat appliances can drain solar and wind energy rapidly. 18

Opposition to Propane

In 2019, New York passed a law that committed to phasing-out buildings and cars that emit greenhouse gas emissions by 2040. 19 In 2022, New York began implementing regulations to ban propane along with phasing out natural gas, heating oil, and gasoline beginning with new home construction in 2025. 20 Minnesota has legislation pending to allow new regulations banning propane, natural gas, and heating oil. 21

Author Robert Bryce found that left-of-center non-governmental organization (NGO) groups were funding environmental organizations by a 4-to-1 margin against industry associations to ban all fossil fuels. 22 Among the environmental anti-propane/hydrocarbon NGOs, $4.5 billion was raised to oppose the use of natural gas, oppose nuclear energy, halt construction of new hydrocarbon infrastructure, promote global warming concerns, and promote select renewable energy. 23

Funding

In 2019, the National Propane Gas Association had net assets of $7,680,115. 24 According to the organization’s tax returns, in 2019 the NPGA recorded $9,082,313 in revenue and $7,690,596 in expenses. 25 In 2018, the National Propane Gas Association had $7,500,828 in revenue and $6,984,737 in expenses. 26

Leadership

Stephen Kaminski has been president and CEO of the National Propane Gas Association since 2019. 27 From 2014 to 2019, Kaminski was CEO of American Association of Poison Control Centers. 28 Kaminski was executive vice president at American Humane Association from 2011 to 2014. 29 From 2005 to 2011, Kaminski was vice president of law at Discovery Communications. 30 Previously, for four years he was an associate at Covington & Burling. 31 Kaminski has a law degree from Harvard Law School and a bachelor’s degree in chemical engineering from Johns Hopkins University. 32

References

  1. “NPGA History.” National Propane Gas Association. Accessed March 19, 2023. https://www.npga.org/about/.
  2. “NPGA History.” National Propane Gas Association. Accessed March 19, 2023. https://www.npga.org/about/.
  3. “NPGA History.” National Propane Gas Association. Accessed March 19, 2023. https://www.npga.org/about/.
  4. “About.” National Propane Gas Association. Accessed March 19, 2023. https://www.npga.org/about/.
  5. “About.” National Propane Gas Association. Accessed March 19, 2023. https://www.npga.org/about/
  6. “Strategic Goals.” National Propane Gas Association. Accessed March 19, 2023. https://www.npga.org/about/.
  7. [1] “NPGA’s Roles and Responsibilities.” National Propane Gas Association. Accessed March 19, 2023. https://www.npga.org/about/.
  8. “NPGA’s Roles and Responsibilities.” National Propane Gas Association. Accessed March 19, 2023. https://www.npga.org/about/.
  9. “Workforce Development.” National Propane Gas Association. Accessed March 19, 2023. https://www.npga.org/about/.
  10. “NPGA’s Educational Outreach.” National Propane Gas Association. Accessed March 19, 2023. https://www.npga.org/about/.
  11. “NPGA’s Educational Outreach.” National Propane Gas Association. Accessed March 19, 2023. https://www.npga.org/about/.
  12. “Business Councils.” National Propane Gas Association. Accessed March 19, 2023. https://www.npga.org/membership/business-councils/.
  13. “Business Councils.” National Propane Gas Association. Accessed March 19, 2023. https://www.npga.org/membership/business-councils/; “Women in Propane Council.” National Propane Gas Association. Accessed March 19, 2023. https://www.npga.org/membership/business-councils/women-in-propane-council/; “Cylinder and Exchange Council.” National Propane Gas Association. Accessed March 19, 2023. https://www.npga.org/membership/business-councils/cylinder-exchange-council/; “Benchmarking Council.” National Propane Gas Association. Accessed March 19, 2023. https://www.npga.org/membership/business-councils/benchmarking-council/.
  14. “Economic Impact.” National Propane Gas Association. Accessed March 20, 2023. https://www.npga.org/impact/economic/.
  15. “Economic Impact.” National Propane Gas Association. Accessed March 20, 2023. https://www.npga.org/impact/economic/.
  16. “Propane’s Environmental Fact Sheet.” National Propane Gas Association. Accessed March 20, 2023. https://www.npga.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/PERC-Enviroment-FactSheet6-02-20.pdf.
  17. “Propane’s Environmental Fact Sheet.” National Propane Gas Association. Accessed March 20, 2023. https://www.npga.org/wp-content/uploads/2020/11/PERC-Enviroment-FactSheet6-02-20.pdf.
  18. “Living With Nature: Solar, Wind, and… Propane?” National Propane Gas Association. November 10, 2020. Accessed March 20, 2023. https://www.npga.org/news-resources/living-with-nature-solar-wind-and-propane/.
  19. Tabuchi, Hiroko. “The New Soldier’s In Propane’s Fight Against Climate Action: Television Stars.” New York Times. January 11, 2023. Accessed March 20, 2023. https://www.nytimes.com/2023/01/11/climate/climate-propane-influence-campaign.html.
  20. Glynn, Matt. “A Plan To Phase Out Fossil Fuels In NY Homes Is Nearing Approval. Here’s What That Means.” Buffalo News. December 5, 2022. Accessed March 20, 2023. https://buffalonews.com/business/local/a-plan-to-phase-out-use-of-fossil-fuels-in-ny-homes-is-nearing-approval/article_7ecfb820-702e-11ed-b545-0fcb7e4e985f.html
  21. “Minnesota’s Backdoor Gas Ban Bill.” NFIB. February 6, 2023. Accessed March 20, 2023. https://www.nfib.com/content/news/minnesota/minnesotas-backdoor-gas-ban-bill/.
  22. Bryce, Robert. “The Anti-Industry Industry.” Substack. February 18, 2023. Accessed March 20, 2023. https://robertbryce.substack.com/p/the-anti-industry-industry.
  23. Bryce, Robert. “The Anti-Industry Industry.” Substack. February 18, 2023. Accessed March 20, 2023. https://robertbryce.substack.com/p/the-anti-industry-industry.
  24. National Propane Gas Association, Return of a Nonprofit Corporation (Form 990), 2019.
  25. National Propane Gas Association, Return of a Nonprofit Corporation (Form 990), 2019.
  26. National Propane Gas Association, Return of a Nonprofit Corporation (Form 990), 2018.
  27. “Leadership and Staff.” National Propane Gas Association. Accessed March 19, 2023. https://www.npga.org/about/leadership-staff/; “Stephen Kaminski.” LinkedIn. Accessed March 19, 2023. https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephen-kaminski-3501161/.
  28. “Stephen Kaminski.” LinkedIn. Accessed March 19, 2023. https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephen-kaminski-3501161/.
  29. “Stephen Kaminski.” LinkedIn. Accessed March 19, 2023. https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephen-kaminski-3501161/.
  30. “Stephen Kaminski.” LinkedIn. Accessed March 19, 2023. https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephen-kaminski-3501161/
  31. “Stephen Kaminski.” LinkedIn. Accessed March 19, 2023. https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephen-kaminski-3501161/.
  32. “Stephen Kaminski.” LinkedIn. Accessed March 19, 2023. https://www.linkedin.com/in/stephen-kaminski-3501161/.
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Nonprofit Information

  • Accounting Period: February - January
  • Tax Exemption Received: September 1, 1944

  • Available Filings

    Period Form Type Total revenue Total functional expenses Total assets (EOY) Total liabilities (EOY) Unrelated business income? Total contributions Program service revenue Investment income Comp. of current officers, directors, etc. Form 990
    2020 Feb Form 990 $9,082,313 $7,690,596 $11,436,335 $3,756,220 Y $56,785 $5,653,438 $234,195 $1,221,982
    2019 Feb Form 990 $7,500,828 $6,984,737 $9,137,867 $3,017,220 Y $43,139 $5,618,159 $207,784 $1,143,333 PDF
    2018 Feb Form 990 $7,586,809 $7,714,623 $9,462,537 $3,680,402 Y $44,225 $5,977,029 $158,176 $1,130,350 PDF
    2017 Feb Form 990 $7,782,917 $7,965,226 $8,587,692 $3,301,002 Y $43,845 $6,217,840 $146,514 $1,307,513 PDF
    2016 Feb Form 990 $7,664,800 $7,485,001 $8,235,944 $3,381,014 Y $65,850 $5,750,296 $141,400 $1,295,974 PDF
    2015 Feb Form 990 $7,277,875 $6,782,570 $7,811,483 $2,711,103 Y $70,775 $5,443,186 $143,991 $1,189,137 PDF
    2014 Feb Form 990 $7,235,979 $6,205,728 $6,923,753 $2,516,593 Y $34,330 $4,837,549 $104,081 $1,074,468 PDF
    2013 Feb Form 990 $7,295,129 $7,238,033 $7,416,579 $3,918,977 Y $256,938 $5,491,778 $132,262 $1,239,220 PDF
    2012 Feb Form 990 $6,436,843 $6,517,836 $6,666,677 $3,348,967 Y $315,028 $4,606,053 $112,653 $1,300,720 PDF

    Additional Filings (PDFs)

    National Propane Gas Association (NPGA)

    1140 Connecticut Ave, NW Suite 1075
    Washington, DC 20036-4017