Non-profit

Montana Policy Institute

Website:

montanapolicy.org

Location:

Helena, MT

Tax ID:

20-2591461

Tax-Exempt Status:

501(c)(3)

Budget (2012):

Revenue: $473,128
Expenses: $506,110
Assets: $67,585

Formation:

2006

Type:

Non-profit

Executive Director:

Brent Mead

The Montana Policy Institute (MPI) is a non-partisan think tank supporting free market, pro-liberty policies in Montana. [1] MPI’s priorities include judicial reform, training future leaders of the pro-liberty movement, expanding school choice, utilizing natural resources, and protecting private property rights. [2]

The Montana Policy Institute is an affiliate member of the State Policy Network, a coalition of state-level right-leaning policy organizations. [3] While MPI is non-partisan, members of its board have affiliations with the Republican Party.

Activity

Founded in 2008, the Montana Policy Institute is a non-partisan think tank supporting free market, pro-liberty policies in Montana. [4]

MPI advocates for judicial reform in Montana, calling the system “unfair and unpredictable,” and claims that Montana’s legal environment makes it difficult for new businesses to come to the state, stunting economic development. [5]

MPI supports expanding school choice programs, including charter schools, education savings accounts, and tax credit programs. [6]

MPI promotes the development of Montana’s natural resources, including oil and coal, and claims this can be done responsibly through collaboration with industry stakeholders and the environmental quality council. [7]

MPI works to protect private property rights, claiming these rights are currently threatened by high property taxes, state laws said to “legalize trespassing,” and land seizures under eminent domain. [8]

In June 2019, MPI was among more than 75 conservative groups that signed a letter sent to Congress in opposition to any carbon tax. Other signers include organizations like Americans for Tax Reform, ALEC Action, the James Madison Institute, the Mackinac Center for Public Policy, and the Pacific Research Institute for Public Policy. [9]

In 2015, MPI opposed Medicaid expansion in Montana, claiming that the program “spent money in the wrong places.” [10]

In 2011, former MPI CEO Carl Graham successfully sued Montana’s Department of Administration to obtain the salaries of all state government employees. MPI later posted the information on a now-defunct website. [11] [12]

Funding

MPI is funded by donations from individuals and other organizations, including the State Policy Network, which contributed in 2014[13] and the Gianforte Family Charitable Trust, which contributed in 2013. [14]

People

Leadership

Brent Mead is Montana Policy Institute CEO. [15] Carl Graham is the former CEO of MPI and the former director of the Sutherland Institute’s Center for Self-Government in the West. [16]

Board of Directors

Neil Livingstone is the founder and former chair of GlobalOptions Inc. and the former chair and CEO of ExecutiveAction LLC. In 2012, Livingstone unsuccessfully ran for Lieutenant Governor of Montana. [17]

Board chair Sam Staley formerly worked as president of the Buckeye Institute and director of urban and land use policy at the Reason Foundation. [18] Staley is currently director of the DeVoe L. Moore Center at Florida State University. [19]

David Keene formerly worked as president of the National Rifle Association, chair of the American Conservative Union, and national chair of Young Americans for Freedom. Keene served on several presidential campaigns, including those of Mitt Romney (2008), Bob Dole (1996), George H.W. Bush (1980), and Ronald Reagan (1976). [20]

Other board members include William Wilson, a former investment advisor; Harry Hyatt, a former executive in the chemical industry; and Chris Helland. [21]

References

  1. “Home.” Montana Policy Institute, 2016. Accessed November 9, 2020. https://montanapolicy.org/. ^
  2. “Our Mission.” Montana Policy Institute, 2016. Accessed November 9, 2020. https://montanapolicy.org/mission/. ^
  3. “The Network: Montana.” State Policy Network, 2020. Accessed November 9, 2020. https://spn.org/directory/#MT. ^
  4. “Home.” Montana Policy Institute, 2016. Accessed November 9, 2020. https://montanapolicy.org/. ^
  5. “Our Mission.” Montana Policy Institute, 2016. Accessed November 9, 2020. https://montanapolicy.org/mission/. ^
  6. “Our Mission.” Montana Policy Institute, 2016. Accessed November 9, 2020. https://montanapolicy.org/mission/. ^
  7. “Our Mission.” Montana Policy Institute, 2016. Accessed November 9, 2020. https://montanapolicy.org/mission/. ^
  8. “Our Mission.” Montana Policy Institute, 2016. Accessed November 9, 2020. https://montanapolicy.org/mission/. ^
  9. “75 Conservative Groups: ‘We oppose any carbon tax.’” Americans for Tax Reform, June 10, 2019. Accessed November 11, 2020. https://www.atr.org/conservative-groups-we-oppose-any-carbon-tax. ^
  10. Monares, Freddy. “Latest report says Montana would lose $5.3 billion in federal funding by 2021.” Bozeman Daily Chronicle, June 29, 2017. Accessed November 11, 2020. https://www.bozemandailychronicle.com/news/health/latest-report-says-montana-would-lose-billion-in-federal-funding/article_46b57dbc-f2e6-596b-9684-b0a95fb2be44.html. ^
  11. Johnson, Charles S. “Montana Policy Institute files suit to obtain annual salaries, compensation data of state employees.” Missoulian, August 18, 2011. Accessed November 11, 2020. https://missoulian.com/news/state-and-regional/montana-policy-institute-files-suit-to-obtain-annual-salaries-compensation-data-of-state-employees/article_0a98c76a-ca0b-11e0-b8bc-001cc4c002e0.html. ^
  12. Johnson, Charles S. “Salary information for state employees available online.” Billings Gazette, July 11, 2012. Accessed November 11, 2020. https://billingsgazette.com/news/state-and-regional/montana/salary-information-for-state-employees-available-online/article_8d49e6d7-e6dd-52b8-ada3-48c6c421dde9.html. ^
  13. State Policy Network, Return of Organization Exempt From Income Tax (Form 990), 2014, Schedule I, Part II. ^
  14. Gianforte Family Charitable Trust, Return of Private Foundation (Form 990-PF), 2013, Part XV, Line 3. ^
  15. “Montana Policy Institute.” State Policy Network. Accessed November 18, 2020. https://spn.org/organization/montana-policy-institute/. ^
  16. “Carl Graham.” LinkedIn, 2020. Accessed November 11, 2020. https://www.linkedin.com/in/carl-graham-37896326/. ^
  17. “Board of Directors.” Montana Policy Institute, 2016. Accessed November 10, 2020. https://montanapolicy.org/board-of-directors/. ^
  18. “Board of Directors.” Montana Policy Institute, 2016. Accessed November 10, 2020. https://montanapolicy.org/board-of-directors/. ^
  19. “Sam Staley.” LinkedIn, 2020. Accessed November 10, 2020. https://www.linkedin.com/in/sam-staley-11a998/. ^
  20. “Board of Directors.” Montana Policy Institute, 2016. Accessed November 10, 2020. https://montanapolicy.org/board-of-directors/. ^
  21. “Board of Directors.” Montana Policy Institute, 2016. Accessed November 10, 2020. https://montanapolicy.org/board-of-directors/. ^

Coalition Memberships

  1. State Policy Network (SPN)
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Nonprofit Information

  • Accounting Period: December - November
  • Tax Exemption Received: May 1, 2006

  • Available Filings

    Period Form Type Total revenue Total functional expenses Total assets (EOY) Total liabilities (EOY) Unrelated business income? Total contributions Program service revenue Investment income Comp. of current officers, directors, etc. Form 990
    2012 Dec Form 990 $473,128 $506,110 $67,585 $16,276 N $469,727 $3,130 $271 $97,647 PDF
    2011 Dec Form 990 $251,487 $436,855 $116,260 $31,969 N $249,549 $1,340 $598 $96,055 PDF

    Additional Filings (PDFs)

    Montana Policy Institute

    PO BOX 852
    Helena, MT 59624-0852