Non-profit

League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC)

Location:

EL PASO, TX

Tax ID:

74-6090399

Tax-Exempt Status:

501(c)(4)

Budget (2015):

Revenue: $790,705
Expenses: $1,089,782
Assets: $198,494

Formation:

1929

Originally:

The Knights of America

The Sons of America

The League of Latin American Citizens

President:

Domingo Garcia (July 2018 – Present)

Roger Rocha (2015 – July 2018)

Chief Executive Officer:

Sindy M. Benavides

The League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC) is a left-of-center organization founded in 1929 that advocates on behalf of left-of-center Hispanic interests. LULAC’s initiatives are executed through programming, political advocacy, and individual member participation at the local level.

Earlier in 2018, LULAC’s leadership suffered after the organization’s former president publically favored right-leaning immigration policies advocated by the Trump administration.

Background

LULAC was originally founded in 1929 to combat discrimination and segregation against Latin Americans and, specifically, against Mexican-Americans.[1] The organization was founded as a result of the unification of three prominent Mexican-American organizations: The Knights of America, The Sons of America, and The League of Latin American Citizens.[2]

The organization claims to be the “oldest Hispanic organization in the United States” and claims to have 132,000 members throughout the U.S. (including Puerto Rico).[3] LULAC reportedly advocates to advance the political influence, health, economic condition, and civil rights of the Hispanic population in the U.S.[4] LULAC advocates for Hispanic Americans through programming, political advocacy, and local membership.[5]

Recent Activities

Initiatives

LULAC is an active promoter of left-of-center policies including civil rights reform, liberal immigration policies, and more lenient criminal sentencing.[6] LULAC is particularly opposed to the immigration policies of the Trump administration and Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE), claiming that ICE performs “terror strikes” and “lightning attacks” in an attempt to instill “fear and anxiety” in immigrants.[7]

Litigation

In 2006, LULAC challenged the Texas Republicans over a redistricting plan which undid a Democratic gerrymander. The case, titled League of United Latin American Citizens v. Perry, alleged that the re-draw violated the Voting Rights Act and the Constitution because it replaced a redistricting plan adopted in 2003 more favorable to Democrats created by a federal judge in following the 2000 U.S. Census.[8] LULAC criticized the resulting partisan advantage and subsequent “diluted racial minority voting strength.”[9] A three-judge district court found that the legislature not only had the right to redistrict but that the plan was constitutional;[10] the Supreme Court found that while a few districts needed revision to comply with the Voting Rights Act, the plan itself it did not violate the Constitution.[11]

Other notable cases LULAC was actively involved in, or contributed legal assistance to, include White v. Regester, Cisneros v. Corpus School District, Hernandez v. Texas, Delgado V. Bastrop, and Mendez v. Westminster.[12]

Funding

The organization’s Form 990 for 2016 shows a total revenue of $795,161 and total expenses of $856,437. LULAC ended 2016 with a fund balance of $7,515.[13] Major financial supporters of LULAC include the left-of-center foundations Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, the California Endowment, Tides Foundation, and Mexican American Legal Defense and Education Fund as well as a number corporate foundations, including those associated with the Ford Motor Company, AT&T, Anheuser-Busch, and Caesars Entertainment.[14] Teachers unions have also funded LULAC; the National Education Association[15] and American Federation of Teachers have both provided contributions to the group in recent years.[16]

Leadership

President

In January 2018, former LULAC president Roger Rocha sent a letter on behalf of LULAC to President Trump conceding to Trump administration proposals for a border wall, an end to the diversity visa lottery, and other increased border security in exchange for a larger pathway to citizenship for illegal immigrants.[17] LULAC members, appalled by Rocha’s letter, demanded that Rocha step down and even began proceedings to impeach him. Refusing to resign, Rocha filed a lawsuit against LULAC to prevent the board from impeaching him and continued to serve the remainder of his term. The scandal impacted other leaders within LULAC and resulted in CEO Brent Wilkes quitting after more than 30 years of dedication to the organization. The current president, Domingo Garcia, was elected in July 2018 after Rocha chose not to seek re-election for another term amid the controversy.[18]

Prior to joining LULAC, Garcia served on the Democratic National Committee (DNC). He served on the committee for eight years, chaired the Latino caucus, and served on the executive committee.[19] Later, Garcia also served as a Democrat in the Texas State House in the early 2000s prior to a failed bid for a seat in the U.S. House of Representatives in 2012.[20]

Chief Executive Officer

Sindy M. Benavides is the chief executive officer of LULAC and replaced previous CEO Brent Wilkes. Previously, she was a political director for the 2012 campaign of U.S. Senator Tim Kaine (D-Virginia) and served as a director of community outreach at the Democratic National Committee.[21]

References

  1. “History.” League of United Latin American Citizens. Accessed September 4, 2018. https://lulac.org/about/history/.
  2. “History.” League of United Latin American Citizens. Accessed September 4, 2018. https://lulac.org/about/history/.
  3. “About Us.” League of United Latin American Citizens. Accessed September 4, 2018. https://lulac.org/about/.
  4. “Mission.” League of United Latin American Citizens. Accessed September 4, 2018. https://lulac.org/about/mission/.
  5. “Action & Policy Center.” League of United Latin American Citizens. Accessed September 4, 2018. https://lulac.org/advocacy/.
  6. “About Us.” League of United Latin American Citizens. Accessed September 4, 2018. https://lulac.org/about/.
  7. “URGENT: LULAC ICE Emergency Crisis Intervention Team.” League of United Latin American Citizens. August 30, 2018. Accessed September 5, 2018. https://lulac.org/news/pr/LULAC_ICE_Emergency_Crisis_Intervention_Team/.
  8. “League of United Latin American Citizens v. Perry.” Oyez. Accessed September 5, 2018. https://www.oyez.org/cases/2005/05-204.
  9. “League of United Latin American Citizens v. Perry.” Oyez. Accessed September 5, 2018. https://www.oyez.org/cases/2005/05-204.
  10. “League of United Latin American Citizens v. Perry.” Oyez. Accessed September 5, 2018. https://www.oyez.org/cases/2005/05-204.
  11. “League of United Latin American Citizens v. Perry.” Oyez. Accessed September 5, 2018. https://www.oyez.org/cases/2005/05-204.
  12. Sambrano, Richard, and Victoria Neave. A Civil Rights Guide to Building a Prosperous America. League of United Latin American Citizens, Revised 2010.
  13. League of United Latin American Citizens, Return of Organization Exempt from Income Tax (Form 990), 2016. https://www.guidestar.org/FinDocuments/2016/746/090/2016-746090399-0e561173-9O.pdf
  14. Data compiled from FoundationSearch.com subscription service, a project of Metasoft Systems, Inc. from forms filed with the Internal Revenue Service. Queries conducted September 11, 2018.
  15. National Education Association, Annual Report of a Labor Organization (Form LM-2), 2015, Schedule 17
  16. American Federation of Teachers, Annual Report of a Labor Organization (Form LM-2), 2017, Schedule 18
  17. Gamboa, Suzanne. “LULAC President Roger Rocha: Trump Letter ‘biggest Mistake of My Life’.” NBCNews.com. February 2, 2018. Accessed September 11, 2018. https://www.nbcnews.com/news/latino/lulac-president-roger-rocha-trump-letter-biggest-mistake-my-life-n844341.
  18. Gamboa, Suzanne. “LULAC President Refuses to Resign despite Outcry from Members.” NBCNews.com. February 16, 2018. Accessed September 4, 2018. https://www.nbcnews.com/news/latino/lulac-president-refuses-resign-despite-outcry-members-n848641.
  19. “LULAC National President Domingo Garcia.” League of United Latin American Citizens. Accessed September 4, 2018. https://lulac.org/about/president/
  20. “Domingo Garcia.” Ballotpedia. Accessed September 4, 2018. https://ballotpedia.org/Domingo_Garcia.
  21. “LULAC Chief Executive Officer.” League of United Latin American Citizens. Accessed September 4, 2018. https://lulac.org/about/ceo/.

Directors, Employees & Supporters

  1. Emma Lozano
    Activist and Supporter

Coalition Memberships

  1. Not One Penny (Non-profit)
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Nonprofit Information

  • Accounting Period: December - November
  • Tax Exemption Received: May 1, 1962

  • Available Filings

    Period Form Type Total revenue Total functional expenses Total assets (EOY) Total liabilities (EOY) Unrelated business income? Total contributions Program service revenue Investment income Comp. of current officers, directors, etc. Form 990
    2015 Dec Form 990 $790,705 $1,089,782 $198,494 $133,483 N $785,710 $0 $420 $162,186 PDF
    2014 Dec Form 990 $730,344 $843,247 $343,156 $52,068 N $728,830 $0 $1,393 $166,779 PDF
    2013 Dec Form 990 $1,048,736 $1,082,721 $485,854 $81,863 N $1,038,870 $0 $2,266 $125,509 PDF
    2012 Dec Form 990 $1,247,260 $939,457 $523,001 $85,025 N $1,246,716 $0 $544 $149,014 PDF
    2011 Dec Form 990 $740,025 $740,884 $199,576 $69,403 N $738,128 $0 $1,897 $0 PDF

    Additional Filings (PDFs)

    League of United Latin American Citizens (LULAC)

    221 N KANSAS ST STE 501
    EL PASO, TX 79901-1430