Non-profit

Convergence Center for Policy Resolution

Website:

convergencepolicy.org/

Location:

WASHINGTON, DC

Tax ID:

32-0280279

Tax-Exempt Status:

501(c)(3)

Budget (2019):

Revenue: $3,268,091
Expenses: $5,574,784
Assets: $1,962,777

President and CEO:

David Eisner

Convergence Center for Policy Resolution, also known simply as Convergence, is a think tank established in 2009 that hosts a variety of projects centered around finding consensus on public policy matters. The group has worked on issues including health care, civil service reform, modernization of Congress, and incarceration and reentry issues.

Convergence receives funding from interest groups on both sides of the political spectrum, including corporations, trade associations, labor unions, and left-of-center grantmaking foundations including the American Federation of Teachers, the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative, and the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation. The group has also received funding from Stand Together, the funding arm of libertarian donor and businessman Charles Koch’s philanthropic network. In March 2022, Convergence announced it had received funding from left-of-center billionaire donor Mackenzie Scott. [1] [2] [3] [4]

Background and History

Convergence Center for Policy Resolution was founded in 2009 by Rob Fersh, a former Congressional staffer who had previously directed the U.S. branch of the international conflict resolution group Search for Common Ground as well as the Food Research and Action Center. Convergence was founded by Fersh and other individuals involved with the Search for Common Ground who had worked with the organization on issues including health insurance coverage and United States-Muslim relations. Their intent was to found an organization modelled after Search for Common Ground that focused on American domestic policy rather than international affairs. [5]

Fersh’s background is in nutrition policy and many of the organization’s early projects centered around developing food and nutrition, school meals, and public health awareness campaigns. Other projects led by the group since its founding focused on revamping the federal budget-making process, long-term care financing, prison reentry, and U.S.-Pakistan relations. [6]

Since its founding, the organization has engaged stakeholders in its projects from both left-of-center and right-of-center sources as well as from both companies and labor unions. Examples include projects featuring input from representatives of the Brookings Institution and the Heritage Foundation, as well as from Walmart and the National Employment Law Project. [7]

Convergence also launched Education Reimagined, now an independent organization promoting left-of-center public education policies. [8]

Funding

Convergence Center for Policy Resolution posts a partial list of its funders on its website that features notable left-leaning foundations and labor unions, as well as companies and trade associations representing the business community.

Left-of-center funders of the group include the American Federation of Teachers, the Annie E. Casey Foundation, the Democracy Fund, the National Education Association, the Rockefeller Brothers Fund, the Bush Foundation, the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the Walton Family Foundation and the William and Flora Hewlett Foundation. [9] In March 2022, Convergence was announced to have received funding from left-of-center billionaire donor Mackenzie Scott. [10]

Business-affiliated funders of the group include America’s Health Insurance Plans, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce, Blue Cross Blue Shield Association, Johnson & Johnson, American Medical Association, American Hospital Association, National Association of Convenience Stores, and the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers Association. [11]

The group has also received funding from Stand Together, the funding arm of libertarian donor and businessman Charles Koch’s philanthropic network. [12]

The organization receives pro-bono legal services from the large corporate law firm Akin Gump. [13]

References

  1. Latest Projects.” Convergence Institute for Policy Resolution. Accessed April 12, 2022. https://convergencepolicy.org/latest-projects/ ^
  2. “History.” Convergence Institute for Policy Resolution. Accessed April 12, 2022. https://convergencepolicy.org/about-convergence/history/ ^
  3. “Funders.” Convergence Institute for Policy Resolution. Accessed April 12, 2022. https://convergencepolicy.org/about-convergence/supporters/ ^
  4. Scott, MacKenzie. “Helping Any of Us Can Help Us All.” Medium. March 23, 2022. Accessed April 12, 2022. https://mackenzie-scott.medium.com/helping-any-of-us-can-help-us-all-f4c7487818d9 ^
  5. “History.” Convergence Institute for Policy Resolution. Accessed April 12, 2022. https://convergencepolicy.org/about-convergence/history/ ^
  6. “History.” Convergence Institute for Policy Resolution. Accessed April 12, 2022. https://convergencepolicy.org/about-convergence/history/ ^
  7. “A Decade of Difference.” Convergence Institute for Policy Resolution. Accessed April 12, 2022. https://www.convergencepolicy.org/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/A-Decade-of-Difference.pdf ^
  8. “Education Reimagined Origin Story.” Education Reimagined. Accessed April 12, 2022. https://education-reimagined.org/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/Education-Reimagined-Origin-Story.pdf ^
  9. “Funders.” Convergence Institute for Policy Resolution. Accessed April 12, 2022. https://convergencepolicy.org/about-convergence/supporters/ ^
  10. Scott, MacKenzie. “Helping Any of Us Can Help Us All.” Medium. March 23, 2022. Accessed April 12, 2022. https://mackenzie-scott.medium.com/helping-any-of-us-can-help-us-all-f4c7487818d9 ^
  11. “Funders.” Convergence Institute for Policy Resolution. Accessed April 12, 2022. https://convergencepolicy.org/about-convergence/supporters/ ^
  12. “Funders.” Convergence Institute for Policy Resolution. Accessed April 12, 2022. https://convergencepolicy.org/about-convergence/supporters/ ^
  13. “Funders.” Convergence Institute for Policy Resolution. Accessed April 12, 2022. https://convergencepolicy.org/about-convergence/supporters/ ^
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Nonprofit Information

  • Accounting Period: December - November
  • Tax Exemption Received: June 1, 2010

  • Available Filings

    Period Form Type Total revenue Total functional expenses Total assets (EOY) Total liabilities (EOY) Unrelated business income? Total contributions Program service revenue Investment income Comp. of current officers, directors, etc. Form 990
    2019 Dec Form 990 $3,268,091 $5,574,784 $1,962,777 $140,369 N $3,109,225 $87,416 $190 $1,093,957 PDF
    2018 Dec Form 990 $5,891,615 $4,917,474 $4,496,549 $367,448 Y $5,877,852 $0 $78 $910,105 PDF
    2017 Dec Form 990 $5,382,638 $4,475,397 $3,393,369 $238,409 N $5,361,570 $0 $668 $777,055 PDF
    2016 Dec Form 990 $3,725,614 $3,433,380 $2,481,435 $171,763 N $3,709,194 $0 $490 $745,776
    2015 Dec Form 990 $2,987,822 $2,355,326 $2,074,251 $56,813 N $2,977,389 $10,370 $55 $513,454 PDF
    2014 Dec Form 990 $2,767,913 $1,632,834 $1,460,142 $75,200 N $2,648,247 $119,400 $43 $356,411 PDF
    2013 Dec Form 990 $1,352,282 $1,544,992 $364,770 $114,907 N $1,254,312 $98,623 $270 $355,693 PDF
    2012 Dec Form 990 $1,202,870 $939,818 $522,570 $79,997 N $1,071,031 $130,263 $37 $347,750 PDF
    2011 Dec Form 990 $764,979 $619,616 $202,857 $23,336 N $764,724 $0 $255 $250,542 PDF
    2010 Dec Form 990 $533,030 $499,923 $34,159 $0 N $533,030 $0 $0 $252,000 PDF

    Additional Filings (PDFs)

    Convergence Center for Policy Resolution

    1133 19TH ST NW STE 410
    WASHINGTON, DC 20036-3631