Non-profit

Charles Engelhard Foundation

Location:

SUMMIT, NJ

Tax ID:

22-6063032

Tax-Exempt Status:

501(c)(3)-PF

Budget (2015):

Revenue: $397,263
Expenses: $8,409,012
Assets: $84,213,943

Formation:

1954

Founder:

Charles Engelhard

Type:

Grant-making Foundation

Charles Engelhard Foundation is a New York-based left-leaning grantmaking foundation that focuses on projects in education, medical, religious, wildlife, and conservation organizations. It was founded in 1954. Charles Engelhard’s five daughters are trustees of the foundation.

History

Charles Engelhard made his fortune in the platinum, gold, and silver business, which he inherited from his father. He expanded his empire across the world, with a successful location in South Africa. [1] His family had a sprawling estate in New Jersey, where Charles Engelhard and his wife lived with their five daughters. The family had champion show dogs and thoroughbred racehorses. At one point, the Engelhards owned over 300 horses across five countries, one horse being an English Triple Crown winner. Charles Engelhard established a business partnership with Harry Oppenheimer, the founder of DeBeers jewelry company. [2]

In 1955, a legislative contest to represent Somerset County in the New Jersey State Senate was held between two future billionaires, magazine publisher Malcom S. Forbes and Charles Engelhard, with Charles Engelhard being defeated. [3] Some believe that Engelhard was the inspiration for Ian Fleming’s 1959 book Goldfinger and the movie that followed. [4] Charles Engelhard died in 1971.

Charles Engelhard’s wife, born Marie Antoinette Jeanne Reiss and later to become known as Jane Engelhard,[5] passed away in 2004. She was a socialite, philanthropist, and was known for her connections to political figures and donations to the White House (Christmas creche) and the Metropolitan Museum of Art. She assisted First Lady Jacqueline Kennedy to restore the White House and served on committees to preserve the White House from the Kennedy Administration through the presidency of George W. Bush. [6] She was a trustee of the Metropolitan Museum of Art from 1974 to 1981 and donated the Charles Engelhard Court to the Met’s American Wing in 1980. [7]

Funding

Charles Engelhard Foundation is a 501(c)(3) tax-exempt private foundation. It reported $1,848,138 in revenue and $7,854,295 in expenditures in its 2018 fiscal year. [8]

Charles Engelhard Foundation allocates money to left-progressive organizations, including Tides Foundation, Planned Parenthood of the Rocky Mountains,[9] EarthJustice, National Wildlife Federation, and Natural Resources Defense Council. [10]

The S Engelhard Center for the Study and Support of Education, Health and Civil Society, a non-profit foundation that was co-founded by Sally Engelhard Pingree (Charles and Jane Engelhard’s daughter), is supported by the Charles Engelhard Foundation, of which Sally Engelhard is a trustee. [11] The S Engelhard Center has received nearly $1 million from the Charles Engelhard Foundation since 2011. [12]

The Potomac School in McLean, Virginia, of which Sally Engelhard Pingree is a member of the board of trustees, has received $1.7 million from Charles Engelhard Foundation since 2010. The foundation has also given $2 million to Georgetown University since 2010, for which Sally Engelhard Pingree is a regent. [13]

Charles Engelhard Foundation has allocated nearly $2.5 million to Refugees International since 2010. [14]

References

  1. Bump, Philip. “The Mystery of a 1970s Racehorse Named ‘Ban Sharia.’” The Washington Post. January 8, 2016. Accessed March 9, 2020. https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-fix/wp/2016/01/08/james-bond-a-millionaire-and-a-mediocre-1970s-racehorse-that-wanted-to-ban-sharia/ ^
  2. “Charles W. Engelhard Jr.” All Engelhard. A Passion for Metals. Accessed March 10, 2020. https://allengelhard.com/biography/charles-w-engelhard-jr/ ^
  3. Wallye. “The Battle of the Billionaires.” Observer. April 24, 2009. Accessed March 9, 2020. https://observer.com/about/ ^
  4. Bump, Philip. “The Mystery of a 1970s Racehorse Named ‘Ban Sharia.’” The Washington Post. January 8, 2016. Accessed March 9, 2020. https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-fix/wp/2016/01/08/james-bond-a-millionaire-and-a-mediocre-1970s-racehorse-that-wanted-to-ban-sharia/ ^
  5. Bump, Philip. “The Mystery of a 1970s Racehorse Named ‘Ban Sharia.’” The Washington Post. January 8, 2016. Accessed March 9, 2020. https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/the-fix/wp/2016/01/08/james-bond-a-millionaire-and-a-mediocre-1970s-racehorse-that-wanted-to-ban-sharia/ ^
  6. Martin, Douglas. “Jane Engelhard, 86, Fixture in Society and Philanthropy.” The New York Times. March 3, 2004. March 9, 2020. https://www.nytimes.com/2004/03/03/nyregion/jane-engelhard-86-fixture-in-society-and-philanthropy.html ^
  7. Times Staff. “Jane Engelhard, 86; Art Collector Gave to the White House, Museum.” Las Angeles Times. March 4, 2004. Accessed March 9, 2020. https://www.latimes.com/archives/la-xpm-2004-mar-04-me-passings4.1-story.html ^
  8. The Charles Engelhard Foundation, Return of Private Foundation Exempt from Income Tax (Form 990-PF), 2018, Part I, Lines 12 and 26. Accessed March 9, 2020. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/display_990/226063032/12_2019_prefixes_22-23%2F226063032_201812_990PF_2019123116986117 ^
  9. The Charles Engelhard Foundation, Return of Private Foundation Exempt from Income Tax (Form 990-PF), 2012, Attachment 19a. Accessed March 9, 2020. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/display_990/226063032/2013_11_PF%2F22-6063032_990PF_201212 ^
  10. The Charles Engelhard Foundation, Return of Private Foundation Exempt from Income Tax (Form 990-PF), 2018, Part VII, Line 3a. Accessed March 9, 2020. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/display_990/226063032/12_2019_prefixes_22-23%2F226063032_201812_990PF_2019123116986117 ^
  11. “About Bringing Theory to Practice.” S Engelhard Center. Accessed March 10, 2020. https://www.bttop.org/about ^
  12. The Charles Engelhard Foundation, Return of Private Foundation Exempt from Income Tax (Form 990-PF), 2018, Part VII, Line 3a. Accessed March 9, 2020. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/display_990/226063032/12_2019_prefixes_22-23%2F226063032_201812_990PF_2019123116986117 ^
  13. The Charles Engelhard Foundation, Return of Private Foundation Exempt from Income Tax (Form 990-PF), 2018, Part VII, Line 3a. Accessed March 9, 2020. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/display_990/226063032/12_2019_prefixes_22-23%2F226063032_201812_990PF_2019123116986117 ^
  14. The Charles Engelhard Foundation, Return of Private Foundation Exempt from Income Tax (Form 990-PF), 2018, Part VII, Line 3a. Accessed March 9, 2020. https://projects.propublica.org/nonprofits/display_990/226063032/12_2019_prefixes_22-23%2F226063032_201812_990PF_2019123116986117 ^
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Nonprofit Information

  • Accounting Period: December - November
  • Tax Exemption Received: November 1, 1954

  • Available Filings

    Period Form Type Total revenue Total functional expenses Total assets (EOY) Total liabilities (EOY) Unrelated business income? Total contributions Program service revenue Investment income Comp. of current officers, directors, etc. Form 990
    2015 Dec Form PF $397,263 $8,409,012 $84,213,943 $4,061,453 $0 $0 $0 $0 PDF
    2014 Dec Form PF $942,070 $11,239,311 $93,422,835 $5,330,017 $0 $0 $0 $0 PDF
    2013 Dec Form PF $802,919 $10,823,296 $98,985,891 $5,322,949 $0 $0 $0 $0 PDF
    2012 Dec Form PF $843,894 $11,525,354 $90,986,757 $5,055,477 $0 $0 $0 $0 PDF
    2011 Dec Form PF $763,061 $9,150,321 $89,225,058 $4,528,666 $0 $0 $0 $0 PDF

    Additional Filings (PDFs)

    Charles Engelhard Foundation

    22 DEFOREST AVE
    SUMMIT, NJ 07901-0000