Non-profit

Brazilian Worker Center

Website:

www.braziliancenter.org/

Location:

Allston, MA

Tax ID:

04-3273525

Tax-Exempt Status:

501(c)(3)

Budget (2017):

Revenue: $498,748
Expenses: $461,548
Assets: $209,677

Formation:

1996

President:

Natalicia Tracy

Type:

Labor-union aligned advocacy organizations

The Brazilian Worker Center is a left-of-center advocacy organization focusing on illegal immigrant-related labor law, gender issues, and other issues concerning expansionist immigration policies. The organization is fiscally supported by a number of labor-union aligned organizations and works to promote labor organizing with workers in Boston, Massachusetts and multiple cities in Connecticut.

The organization also runs a legal clinic to provide attorneys to workers in wage-related legal cases. It has also worked with large labor unions to promote legislation regarding labor organizing and employment mandates in the state of Massachusetts. [1] [2]

Labor Union-Aligned Advocacy

Natalicia Tracy, executive director for BWC, worked closely with 11 Massachusetts branches of the AFL-CIO to write the Domestic Workers Bill of Rights, a Massachusetts state bill designed to place increased mandates on households employing domestic workers. The bill also covers a number of liberal issues such as expansionist immigration issues, and gender-based issues. The Massachusetts bill was signed into law in 2017. [3]

Racial Agenda

The Brazilian Worker Center has advocated for left-progressive racial activism, producing a film series with Showing Up For Racial Justice, a far-left agitation group focused on getting white Americans to participate in racial reconciliation advocacy. The organization also took part in a city-wide “race dialogue” in Boston, an event organized in order to protest the housing of higher-income people and broader revitalization in Boston. The event was hosted by the Hyams Foundation, a left-of-center grantmaking organization that funds left-of-center and liberal racial-interest groups. [4] [5]

Partner Organizations

BWC lists a number of left-leaning and liberal organizations as advocacy partners on its website. Most notably, the organization lists National Domestic Workers Alliance, a labor-union-aligned left-of-center organization funded by major left-wing funding organizations such as the Ford Foundation and George SorosOpen Society Foundations that campaigns for mandates on the employers of domestic workers. The website also lists a number of smaller, labor-aligned organizations local to Boston, such as Community Labor United, the Labor Resource Center of the University of Massachusetts, and the Boston Women’s Fund as partners. [6]

Leadership

Natalicia Tracy is the executive director for Brazilian Worker Center. She also works as a sociology lecturer at the University of Massachusetts, Boston, where she teaches classes on labor studies, immigration policy, and race issues. [7] She was named one of the nations “25 Key Black Women Leaders” by the AFL-CIO, the largest federation of labor unions in the United States. [8] In 2019, Tracy was recognized as a Barr Fellow, a fellowship offered to Boston-based left-progressive leaders by the Barr Foundation, a left-of-center Boston-based grantmaking organization. [9]

Funding

BWC lists a number of funders, many of which are left-leaning or liberal grantmaking organizations, or organizations aligned with labor union interests. Notably, the organization received a grant of $35,930 in 2018, from National Domestic Workers Alliance;[10] $100,000 from the Nathan Cummings Foundation, a left-of-center grantmaking organization that funds labor-aligned organizations;[11] and an undisclosed amount from a recently defunct Berger-Marks Foundation, an organization that made grants to labor unions and organizations advocation for labor union interests. The organization also received a $129,800 grant from OSHA, the government agency tasked with enforcing workplace-safety legislation. [12]

References

  1. “Archive of past events.” Brazilian Worker Center. Accessed July 26, 2020. https://www.braziliancenter.org/about/bwc/Archive_of_Past_Events. ^
  2. “Organizational overview.” Brazilian Worker Center. Accessed July 26, 2020. https://www.braziliancenter.org/about/bwc/Organizational_Overview. ^
  3. “Archive of Past Events.” Brazilian Worker Center. Accessed August 3, 2020. https://www.braziliancenter.org/about/bwc/Archive_of_Past_Events. ^
  4. “Mayor Walsh Announces Continuation Of Race Dialogues With Partnership Of Hyams Foundation.” Boston.gov. Accessed August 3, 2020. https://www.boston.gov/news/mayor-walsh-announces-continuation-race-dialogues-partnership-hyams-foundation. ^
  5. “Racial Justice.” Brazilian Worker Center. Accessed August 3, 2020. https://www.braziliancenter.org/about/programs/Racial_Justice. ^
  6. “Foundations and Funders.” Brazilian Worker Center. Accessed August 3, 2020. https://www.braziliancenter.org/about/partners/. ^
  7. “Natalicia Tracy Staff Profile.” UMASS, Boston. Accessed August 3, 2020. https://www.umb.edu/academics/cla/faculty/natalicia_rocha_tracy. ^
  8. “Natalicia Tracy Profile, 2019.” Barr Foundation. Accesd August 3, 2020. https://www.barrfoundation.org/bios/natalicia-tracy. ^
  9. “2019 Fellows.” Barr Foundation. Accessed August 3, 2020. https://www.barrfoundation.org/barr-fellowship. ^
  10. “2018 IRS 990 Return of Organization Exempt from Income Tax: National Domestic Workers Alliance.” ^
  11. “Grant Recipients.” Cummings Foundation. Accessed August 3, 2020. https://www.cummingsfoundation.org/grants/grant_recipients.htm. ^
  12. “Susan Harwood Training Grants 2019.” OSHA. Accessed August 3, 2020. https://www.osha.gov/sites/default/files/FY_2018_Susan_Harwood_Grant_Awardees_Abstracts.pdf. ^
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Nonprofit Information

  • Accounting Period: December - November
  • Tax Exemption Received: April 1, 1996

  • Available Filings

    Period Form Type Total revenue Total functional expenses Total assets (EOY) Total liabilities (EOY) Unrelated business income? Total contributions Program service revenue Investment income Comp. of current officers, directors, etc. Form 990
    2017 Dec Form 990 $498,748 $461,548 $209,677 $14,174 N $446,218 $51,048 $0 $58,650
    2016 Dec Form 990 $496,805 $414,878 $173,865 $15,562 N $462,769 $32,821 $0 $47,276
    2015 Dec Form 990 $433,626 $486,435 $88,647 $19,271 N $272,735 $166,048 $0 $0 PDF
    2014 Dec Form 990 $437,263 $422,052 $146,018 $23,833 N $380,608 $56,654 $1 $0 PDF
    2013 Dec Form 990 $468,468 $571,333 $126,236 $19,262 N $348,397 $117,312 $2 $1,682 PDF
    2012 Dec Form 990 $521,164 $404,910 $217,413 $7,574 N $469,699 $60,008 $1 $64,731 PDF
    2011 Dec Form 990 $261,054 $194,814 $97,847 $28,667 N $230,664 $24,443 $0 $34,334 PDF

    Additional Filings (PDFs)

    Brazilian Worker Center

    14 HARVARD AVE 2ND FLOOR
    Allston, MA 02134-1706