Non-profit

Americans for Limited Government

Website:

getliberty.org/

Location:

Fairfax, VA

Tax ID:

36-3975580

Tax-Exempt Status:

501(c)(4)

Budget (2018):

Revenue: $903,194
Expenses: $1,108,451
Assets: $20,208

Type:

Right-of-Center Advocacy Group

Formation:

1996

Americans for Limited Government (ALG) is a libertarian-leaning political advocacy organization that has promoted ballot initiatives and public policy at the state and federal level in support of free enterprise, school choice, and the prevention of eminent domain abuse. [1]

ALG chair Howard Rich has been involved with several other conservative-leaning nonprofits that reportedly share the same address in Fairfax, Virginia. [2]

Background

Americans for Limited Government (ALG) is a libertarian political advocacy organization that seeks to reduce the size and scope of the government to increase individual freedom. It promotes free enterprise, fiscal responsibility, regulatory reform, and government transparency to members of Congress and state legislatures. [3]

ALG has supported reforms to limit eminent domain, strengthen private property rights, reduce taxes, limit government spending, implement school choice programs, limit the power of the judiciary, and mandate government accountability. [4] ALG has stated that its agenda is to roll back government programs and regulations wherever they have “impaired or impinged” individual freedoms. [5]

Former U.S. Senator Tom Coburn (R-OK) previously worked as ALG chairman between his tenure as a U.S. Representative and his election to the U.S. Senate. [6]

Leadership

Howard Rich has been the chairman of Americans for Limited Government (ALG) since 2002. He is also the founder of U.S. Term Limits, an organization which seeks to implement strict term limits for all politicians. A real estate investor in New York, Rich has also served as chairman for the Legislative Education Directive and the Parents in Charge Foundation. Rich was formerly a board member of the Cato Institute and a director at Club for Growth. [7] [8]

Rick Manning is the president of ALG and the ALG Foundation, its sister charitable organization. [9] Manning previously worked as Chief of Staff for Public Affairs in the U.S. Department of Labor during the George W. Bush administration. Though conservative, Manning has been critical of free trade agreements often backed by Republicans. [10] Manning is associated with the Stop Corporate Tyranny coalition seeking “to get corporate America back to neutral” on political matters. [11]

Don Todd is the executive advisor for ALG. [12] Todd previously worked for the U.S. Department of Labor and for the Republican National Committee (RNC). He was also the research director for the Phil Gramm presidential campaign in 1996. [13]

Advocacy

After the controversial 2005 Kelo v. City of New London decision by the U.S. Supreme Court, which affirmed the government’s ability to seize private property to give to private developers, Americans for Limited Government (ALG) launched several ballot initiatives to curb state or local governments from engaging in eminent domain abuse. [14]

In the 2006 election, ALG worked in Arizona, California, Idaho, Missouri, Montana, Nevada, and Oklahoma to propose ballot measures in order to regulate the government’s use of eminent domain. Its petitions in Oklahoma and Missouri did not get enough signatures to qualify for the ballot, and a Montana judge determined there was signature fraud and blocked the ALG-supported measure from going to a vote. Of the three states in which ALG successfully placed measures on the ballot, voters in Arizona approved the proposal, but voters in Idaho and California rejected ALG-backed property rights ballot initiatives. [15]

ALG has long supported the “taxpayer bill of rights,” a proposal which seeks to place a cap on state spending unless voters directly approve additional programs. The cap would be based on an index of inflation and population growth. The proposal also seeks to allow voters to decide whether the state should be allowed to spend revenue surpluses, save them in “rainy day” funds, or refund taxpayers. In 2006, ALG supported taxpayer bill of rights ballot initiatives in Maine, Nebraska, and Oregon, though voters rejected the measures. [16]

Controversies

Americans for Limited Government (ALG) was initially located in Illinois, but it was allegedly pushed out of the state for not complying with state nonprofit laws, according to reporting by the left-of-center Center for Public Integrity. It then relocated to Fairfax, Virginia. [17]

In 2012, the Center for Responsive Politics (CRP) reported that several nonprofit organizations associated with ALG chairman Howard Rich operated out of the same Fairfax County address. These included ALG, the ALG Foundation, U.S. Term Limits, the U.S.Term Limits Foundation, Legislative Education Action Drive, and the Parents In Charge Foundation. [18]

The groups reportedly issued grants and loaned money to each other. In 2010, the ALG Foundation gave the Parents In Charge Foundation a grant of $225,000 and the U.S. Term Limits Foundation a grant of $234,000. But the ALG Foundation also owed a debt of $1 million to ALG. [19]

References

  1. Americans for Limited Government. LinkedIn. Accessed August 13, 2021. https://www.linkedin.com/company/americans-limited-government/about/ ^
  2. Howard Rich. Ballotpedia. Accessed August 13, 2021. https://ballotpedia.org/Howard_Rich ^
  3. About. Americans for Limited Government. Accessed August 13, 2021. https://getliberty.org/about-alg/ ^
  4. Americans for Limited Government. Ballotpedia. Accessed August 13, 2021. https://ballotpedia.org/Americans_for_Limited_Government ^
  5. Americans for Limited Government. LinkedIn. Accessed August 13, 2021. https://www.linkedin.com/company/americans-limited-government/about/ ^
  6. Shuckerow, Carolyn. “Washington from the Inside.” Roll Call. Roll Call, October 27, 2003. https://www.rollcall.com/2003/10/27/washington-from-the-inside/. ^
  7. Howard Rich. Ballotpedia. Accessed August 13, 2021. https://ballotpedia.org/Howard_Rich ^
  8. Howard Rich. LinkedIn. Accessed August 14, 2021. https://www.linkedin.com/in/howardrich/ ^
  9. About. Americans for Limited Government. Accessed August 13, 2021. https://getliberty.org/about-alg/ ^
  10. Zeller, Shawn. “Conversation: Rick Manning of Americans for Limited Government.” Roll Call. February 16, 2017. Accessed August 13, 2021. https://www.rollcall.com/2017/02/16/conversation-rick-manning-of-americans-for-limited-government/ ^
  11. Schwarz, D. Hunter. “Why the relationship between the GOP and big business is getting complicated

    Long the party of big business, Republicans are increasingly finding themselves at odds with major companies.” Deseret News. April 8, 2021. Accessed August 14, 2021. https://www.deseret.com/2021/4/8/22368327/why-the-relationship-between-the-gop-and-big-business-is-getting-complicated-republican-mcconnell ^

  12. About. Americans for Limited Government. Accessed August 13, 2021. https://getliberty.org/about-alg/ ^
  13. Don Todd. LinkedIn. Accessed August 13, 2021. https://www.linkedin.com/in/don-todd-879baa15/ ^
  14. Americans for Limited Government. Ballotpedia. Accessed August 13, 2021. https://ballotpedia.org/Americans_for_Limited_Government ^
  15. Americans for Limited Government. Ballotpedia. Accessed August 13, 2021. https://ballotpedia.org/Americans_for_Limited_Government ^
  16. Americans for Limited Government. Ballotpedia. Accessed August 13, 2021. https://ballotpedia.org/Americans_for_Limited_Government ^
  17. Americans for Limited Government. Ballotpedia. Accessed August 13, 2021. https://ballotpedia.org/Americans_for_Limited_Government ^
  18. Choma, Russ. “Rich Rewards: One Man’s Shadow Money Network.” Center for Responsive Politics (OpenSecrets.org). June 19, 2012. Accessed August 14, 2021. https://www.opensecrets.org/news/2012/06/rich-rewards-one-mans-shadow-money-network/ ^
  19. Choma, Russ. “Rich Rewards: One Man’s Shadow Money Network.” Center for Responsive Politics (OpenSecrets.org). June 19, 2012. Accessed August 14, 2021. https://www.opensecrets.org/news/2012/06/rich-rewards-one-mans-shadow-money-network/ ^
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Nonprofit Information

  • Accounting Period: December - November
  • Tax Exemption Received: April 1, 1996

  • Available Filings

    Period Form Type Total revenue Total functional expenses Total assets (EOY) Total liabilities (EOY) Unrelated business income? Total contributions Program service revenue Investment income Comp. of current officers, directors, etc. Form 990
    2018 Dec Form 990 $903,194 $1,108,451 $20,208 $322,500 N $0 $903,194 $0 $121,250 PDF
    2017 Dec Form 990 $808,228 $886,652 $86,956 $183,991 Y $0 $808,228 $0 $137,500 PDF
    2016 Dec Form 990 $2,502,834 $2,701,214 $31,389 $50,000 Y $0 $2,502,834 $0 $105,000
    2015 Dec Form 990 $847,059 $800,798 $738,520 $559,366 Y $0 $847,059 $0 $105,000 PDF
    2014 Dec Form 990 $710,102 $1,078,610 $692,259 $559,366 Y $694,028 $0 $15,099 $18,000 PDF
    2013 Dec Form 990 $499,607 $782,956 $1,060,767 $559,366 Y $483,487 $0 $16,120 $27,344 PDF
    2012 Dec Form 990 $6,839,621 $7,016,376 $1,333,802 $549,366 Y $6,771,591 $0 $18 $59,066 PDF
    2011 Dec Form 990 $826,942 $1,038,919 $1,477,268 $511,753 Y $790,797 $0 $36,145 $52,667 PDF
    2010 Dec Form 990 $9,068,659 $8,613,552 $1,684,360 $525,339 Y $9,049,296 $0 $0 $58,750 PDF

    Additional Filings (PDFs)

    Americans for Limited Government

    10332 Main Street, Box 326
    Fairfax, VA 22030