Website:

www.va-aflcio.org/%20

Location:

RICHMOND, VA

Tax ID:

54-0419003

Tax-Exempt Status:

501(c)(5)

Budget (2018):

Revenue: $861,912
Expenses: $810,413
Assets: $858,979

Type:

Labor Union

President:

Doris Crouse-Mays

The Virginia AFL-CIO is the state-level body for the American Federation of Labor-Congress of Industrial Organization (AFL-CIO) labor union federation in Virginia. The AFL-CIO is the largest federation of labor unions in the United States, and the Virginia AFL-CIO is the state’s largest federation of labor unions. [1]

Virginia AFL-CIO promotes left-progressive policies, including increasing workplace regulations, increasing the minimum wage, and expanding organized labor’s collective bargaining powers throughout the state of Virginia. [2]

History

The Virginia AFL-CIO was founded in 1956 in Richmond, Virginia, just one year after the American Federation of Labor merged with the Congress of Industrial Organizations to form the national AFL-CIO. [3] From the beginning of its history, the Virginia AFL-CIO has actively supported left-of-center labor policy, with early Virginia AFL-CIO event records demonstrating support for the sweeping left-of-center labor regulations imposed under President Lyndon Johnson’s administration. Records from the 1965 event show support for left-of-center public work programs and increased wages. [4]

Over the years, the Virginia AFL-CIO has pushed such policies in Virginia, though it has encountered resistance from a traditionally right-of-center government. As left-of-center representatives have increased Democratic power in the state in recent years though, the Virginia AFL-CIO has become more active in its campaigns. In early 2020, the Virginia AFL-CIO pressured Virginia Governor Ralph Northam (D) to approve an increase in the state’s minimum wage. Gov. Northam eventually signed the legislation but made it effective in May of 2021, instead of in January. Virginia AFL-CIO’s communications director, Destiny LeVere, praised the increase in minimum wage, but voiced frustration that the governor delayed its implementation. [5]

Also in 2020, the Virginia AFL-CIO created a website entitled “Labor in Session,” which reports on Virginia AFL-CIO legislative campaigns relating to the Virginia state government. The Virginia AFL-CIO lobbies legislators on issues it deems relevant to workers across the state and uses the website to track its initiatives. After the election of several new Democratic representatives to the Virginia State Assembly in 2020, the AFL-CIO adopted an aggressive left-progressive legislative agenda now tracked on the Labor in Session website. [6] The site is also designed to organize grassroots activism by providing lobbying schedules and information, creating direct action campaigns to mobilize supporters, and offering left-of-center “talking points” on legislation. [7]

As of March 2021, the Virginia AFL-CIO is running campaigns to mobilize supporters in support of the Protecting the Right to Organize (PRO) Act, a controversial piece of federal legislation that would expand union power and override Virginia’s right-to-work law,[8] and in support of a bill that would guarantee convicted felons the ability to vote. [9]

Political Activities

The Virginia AFL-CIO operates through grassroots campaigns, collective bargaining initiatives, media outreach, legislative lobbying, and political endorsements. The Virginia AFL-CIO works toward increasing Virginia’s minimum wage, increasing unemployment benefits, and implementing increased regulations and worker protection policies, in addition to promoting increased collective bargaining. [10]

The Virginia AFL-CIO is a staunch supporter of Democratic candidates, frequently providing endorsements prior to election cycles. In 2020, the Virginia AFL-CIO released one such slate of endorsements, supporting candidates including President Joe Biden and U.S. Representatives Bobby Scott (D-VA), Gerry Connolly (D-VA), and Jennifer Wexton (D-VA). The Virginia AFL-CIO also endorsed failed U.S. House of Representatives candidate Qasim Rashid (D-VA) and failed Virginia House of Delegates candidate Irina Khanin. [11]

Legislative Campaigns and Lobbying

The Virginia AFL-CIO has promoted – left-of-center bills at the state and federal level. During the COVID-19 pandemic, the Virginia AFL-CIO supported Virginia Delegate Elizabeth Guzman’s (D) legislation which aimed to require employers to offer two weeks of paid leave to employees who work “on average at least 20 hours a week,” if they were exposed to COVID-19 or needed to care for family members. The bill allocated the associated costs of paid leave to be paid by Virginia’s Department of Medical Assistance Services, which handles the state’s Medicaid program. [12] The Virginia AFL-CIO joined with the left-of-center Virginia Interfaith Center for Public Policy (VICPP), Virginia State Senator Barbara Favola (D), and the Service Employees International Union in support of the measure, which eventually failed. [13]

The Virginia AFL-CIO has also opposed right-to-work legislation in the state of Virginia. Since 1947, Virginia has prohibited unions from forcing workers compelled to accept union representation who are not union members to pay fees without voluntary consent, and from 1993 until 2020, Virginia barred public-sector employees from practicing collective bargaining. In recent years, the Virginia AFL-CIO has sought to repeal these measures, claiming that the 2021 Virginia gubernatorial election will prove critical in its efforts to do so. As of March 2021, the Virginia AFL-CIO has not endorsed a specific candidate, though it has maintained that any endorsed candidate must commit to repealing right to work laws, including provisions that prohibit union security agreements between employers and labor unions. [14]

Aside from organizing at the state level, the Virginia AFL-CIO has been active in lobbying for the Protecting the Right to Organize (PRO) Act, a bill which passed in the U.S. House of Representatives in March of 2021 and is pending Senate approval. The PRO Act would expand collective bargaining privileges across the country, prevent employers from allegedly “misclassifying” workers as independent contractors, bar employers from spreading anti-union messaging, and prohibit employers from permanently replacing striking workers with non-union employees. [15] The bill has received supported from President Joe Biden, and U.S. Senator Tim Kaine (D-VA) is co-sponsoring the bill. [16]

Grassroots Campaigning

Aside from its own legislative advocacy initiatives, the Virginia AFL-CIO participates in grassroots organizing efforts through “Stronger Communities. Better Bargains,” a campaign focused on securing collective bargaining privileges for public employees in Virginia. [17] The coalition includes the largest labor unions in the country, featuring the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME), the American Federation of Teachers (AFT), Communications Workers of America (CWA), the Service Employees International Union (SEIU), the Virginia Education Association (VEA), Virginia Professional Fire Fighters (VPFF), and United Food and Commercial Workers (UFCW) Local 400. [18]

The coalition worked with Virginia Delegate Elizabeth Guzman (D), an AFSCME member, to pass Virginia House Bill 582, which overturned a decades-long ban which prevented government workers from participating in collective bargaining. [19] The bill passed in early 2020, but shortly thereafter, Virginia Governor Ralph Northam announced that the effective date of the bill would be delayed to May 2021. In response, the coalition issued a statement sharing their disappointment regarding the delay and accused Gov. Northam of potentially requesting an additional delay in the future. [20]

COVID-19 Advocacy

Virginia became the first state in the United States to implement mandatory workplace safety regulations governing COVID-19, for which it received praise from the Virginia AFL-CIO. [21] The measures were set to be enforced until Gov. Northam ended the state of emergency in Virginia, though Virginia AFL-CIO president Doris Crouse-Mays has stated that she hopes the strict labor regulations will remain in effect even after the pandemic. [22] These include regulations that mandate mask-wearing and social distancing in the workplace, in addition to setting protocols to shut down businesses if employees become infected with COVID-19. Businesses not following these mandates would be fined. [23]

During the summer of 2020, after businesses were permitted to open again following the shutdown, Virginia AFL-CIO criticized the Virginia Employment Commission’s attempt to halt unemployment benefits for workers who refused to return to work when called upon by their employers. The Virginia AFL-CIO and other labor unions claimed these employees were put in danger because the state had not put enough safeguards in place to keep workplaces safe from COVID-19, and argued that workers who refused to return to work despite having jobs should continue to collect unemployment benefits. [24]

In September of 2020, the Virginia AFL-CIO supported the Virginia General Assembly’s dismissal of bills that aimed to grant immunity from COVID-19 liability lawsuits for employers. [25]

Leadership

Doris Anne Crouse-Mays, president of Virginia AFL-CIO, has worked for the union since 2003, first working as the group’s political director. In 2006, she was elected secretary-treasurer, becoming the first woman to serve in an executive office within the organization. In 2010, she became the first woman elected president of the Virginia AFL-CIO. Crouse-Mays has since built a public profile in the Democratic Party. In 2008, Crouse-Mays joined the Democratic National Committee (DNC), and in 2010, she was named a member of the executive council. She also sits as co-chair of the DNC Budget and Finance Committee. [26]

Lorne Seay has worked as secretary-treasurer of Virginia AFL-CIO since 2014 and has been a member of the Virginia AFL-CIO’s executive council since 2009. He began his career as the business representative for the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW) Local 26 in 2004, where he now sits on the Examining Board. He continues to work as a delegate to the Northern Virginia Area Labor Federation, an AFL-CIO affiliate, on behalf of IBEW Local 26. Sen. Kaine appointed Seay to the Virginia Apprenticeship Council during his time as governor of Virginia. Seay was also appointed to the executive council of the Virginia State Building and Construction Trades in 2014. [27]

Financials

Virginia AFL-CIO made dozens of campaign contributions to various candidates running for offices throughout Virginia, including Virginia Delegates Louise Lucas (D), Luke Torian (D), and Jeion Ward (D). [28] [29] [30] The union also contributed to the Virginia State Senate campaigns of Senators Dave Marsden, J. Chapman Petersen, and John Edwards. [31] [32][33] [34] [35]

The union also contributed to left-leaning organizations and organizations affiliated with the Democratic Party, including $15,150 to the Democratic Party of Virginia, $2,500 to the Virginia Senate Democratic Caucus, $15,000 to the Commonwealth Victory Fund, $500 to the Virginia Democratic Women’s Caucus, $6,000 to the Virginia Legislative Black Caucus, and $650 to the Virginia Young Democrats. The Virginia AFL-CIO also contributed $2,500 to the We Rise Together PAC, a Democratic Party-aligned political action committee. [36]

When U.S. Senator Tim Kaine (D-VA) ran for governor in Virginia in 2005, he received campaign contributions from labor unions, including the SEIU, Laborers Local 980, Virginia AFL-CIO, and IBEW. [37]

In 2018, the Bakery, Confectionery, Tobacco Workers, and Grain Millers’ International Union (BCTGM) gave $10,000 to the Virginia AFL-CIO. [38] In 2010, 2012, and 2014, the International Association of Bridge, Structural, Ornamental, and Reinforcing Iron Workers (IW) gave the Virginia AFL-CIO the most money of any other organization during those cycles, giving $72,750,[39] $35,000, [40] and $41,250 respectively. [41] In 2006 and 2008, the International Brotherhood of Boilermakers gave $11,000[42] and $10,000[43] to the Virginia AFL-CIO respectively.

References

  1. Marans, Daniel. “Why Virginia is Organized Labor’s Next Big Battleground.” HuffPost. February 24, 2021. Accessed March 7, 2021. https://www.huffpost.com/entry/virginia-labor-unions-democratic-governor-primary_n_60356fbcc5b6dfb6a734f2ff ^
  2. About Us. Virginia AFL-CIO. Accessed March 6, 2021. https://www.va-aflcio.org/about-us ^
  3. “Virginia State AFL-CIO Records.” ArchivesSpace at GSU Library. Georgia State University. Accessed March 22, 2021. https://archivesspace.library.gsu.edu/repositories/2/resources/284. ^
  4. “Washington, D.C.: Virginia AFL-CIO Convention August 19, 1965.” Minnesota Historical Society. Accessed March 22, 2021. http://www2.mnhs.org/library/findaids/00442/pdfa/00442-01666.pdf. ^
  5. Cheslow, Daniella. “In Virginia, Gov. Northam Delays Raising the Minimum Wage to May 2021. WAMU. April 12, 2020. Accessed March 13, 2021. https://wamu.org/story/20/04/12/in-virginia-gov-northam-delays-raising-the-minimum-wage-to-may-2021/ ^
  6. About. “Labor’s Legislative Agenda.” Labor in Session. Accessed March 13, 2021. https://www.laborinsession.com/about ^
  7. “About: Labor In Session.” Laborinsession. Virginia AFL-CIO. Accessed March 22, 2021. https://www.laborinsession.com/about. ^
  8. Watson, Michael. “Indiana Carpenters’ Challenge to Unanimous Decertification Undermines ‘Free-Rider’ Claims.” Capital Research Center. Capital Research Center, March 9, 2021. https://capitalresearch.org/article/indiana-carpenters-challenge-to-unanimous-decertification-undermines-free-rider-claims/. ^
  9. Action – Campaigns. Labor in Session. Accessed March 13, 2021. https://www.laborinsession.com/action-campaigns ^
  10. Crouse-Mays, Doris. “Virginia AFL-CIO President Doris Crouse-Mays: Virginia’s #1 for Business and Last for Workers.” Blue Virginia. July 12, 2019. Accessed March 13, 2021. https://bluevirginia.us/2019/07/virginia-afl-cio-president-doris-crouse-mays-virginias-1-for-business-and-last-for-workers ^
  11. LeVere, Destiny. “2020 Virginia Endorsements.” Virginia AFL-CIO. August 26, 2020. Accessed March 13, 2021. https://www.va-aflcio.org/news/2020-virginia-endorsements ^
  12. Masters, Kate. “’Things We Cannot Support’: Advocates Back Away From Quarantine Leave Bill for Major Changes.” Virginia Mercury. September 9, 2020. Accessed March 7, 2021. https://www.virginiamercury.com/2020/09/09/things-we-cannot-support-advocates-back-away-from-quarantine-leave-bill-after-major-changes/ ^
  13. “Paid Sick Days Bill (SB 481) Fails – Putting the Health of All Virginians at Risk.” Blue Virginia. March 8, 2020. Accessed March 13, 2021. https://bluevirginia.us/2020/03/paid-sick-days-bill-sb-481-fails-putting-the-health-of-all-virginians-at-risk ^
  14. Marans, Daniel. “Why Virginia is Organized Labor’s Next Big Battleground.” HuffPost. February 24, 2021. Accessed March 7, 2021. https://www.huffpost.com/entry/virginia-labor-unions-democratic-governor-primary_n_60356fbcc5b6dfb6a734f2ff ^
  15. Jones, Sarah. “The PRO Act Could Do More Than Revive Unions.” New York Magazine. March 13, 2021. Accessed March 13, 2021. https://nymag.com/intelligencer/2021/03/what-is-the-pro-act.html ^
  16. Santucci, Jeanine. “House Passes Sweeping Pro-Union Bill that Would Reform Labor Laws.” USA Today. March 9, 2021. Accessed March 13, 2021. https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/politics/2021/03/09/house-passes-pro-act-bill-would-reform-labor-laws/4636381001/ ^
  17. Groups – Stronger Communities. A Better Bargain. The Action Network. Accessed March 13, 2021. https://actionnetwork.org/groups/stronger-communities-a-better-bargain ^
  18. “Virginia House Passes Bill to Give Public Service Workers the Freedom to Collectively Bargain.” Blue Virginia. February 6, 2020. Accessed March 13, 2021. https://bluevirginia.us/2020/02/virginia-house-passes-bill-to-give-public-service-workers-the-freedom-to-collectively-bargain ^
  19. Scalos, Meredith. “Collective Bargaining Bill Passed by the Virginia House of Delegates.” The American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees (AFSCME). February 10, 2020. Accessed March 13, 2021. https://www.afscme.org/blog/collective-bargaining-bill-passed-by-the-virginia-house-of-delegates ^
  20. “Coalition Statement on Collective Bargaining.” Virginia Education Association. April 13, 2020. Accessed March 14, 2021. https://www.veanea.org/coalition-statement-on-collective-bargaining/  ^
  21. Kutner, Brad. “Virginia Officials Hear Debate Over Stricter Labor Rules.” Courthouse News Service. January 5, 2021. Accessed March 7, 2021. https://www.courthousenews.com/virginia-officials-hear-debate-over-stricter-labor-rules/ ^
  22. Kutner, Brad. “Virginia Officials Hear Debate Over Stricter Labor Rules.” Courthouse News Service. January 5, 2021. Accessed March 7, 2021. https://www.courthousenews.com/virginia-officials-hear-debate-over-stricter-labor-rules/ ^
  23. Metcalfe, Trevor. “Virginia Board Adopts Final Pandemic-Long COVID Workplace Rules.” The Virginian-Pilot. February 1, 2021. Accessed March 7, 2021. https://www.pilotonline.com/inside-business/vp-ib-permanent-covid-rules-0201-20210201-fzw3tqnhbrg7flaxujkipc6cfm-story.html    ^
  24. Oliver, Ned. “Virginia Cuts Off Unemployment Benefits to 12,000 People for Refusing to Return to Work.”  Virginia Mercury. June 18, 2020. Accessed March 13, 2021. https://www.virginiamercury.com/blog-va/virginia-cuts-off-unemployment-benefits-to-12000-people-for-refusing-to-return-to-work/ ^
  25. Friedenberger, Amy. “General Assembly Scraps Attempt at COVID-19 Civil Immunity for Businesses.” The Roanoke Times. September 3, 2020. Accessed March 13, 2021. https://roanoke.com/news/local/general-assembly-scraps-attempt-at-covid-19-civil-immunity-for-businesses/article_f67fc351-21b2-576b-9576-6df241bf4743.html ^
  26. About Us – Doris Crouse-Mays – President. Virginia AFL-CIO. Accessed March 6, 2021. https://www.va-aflcio.org/about-us/doris-crouse-mays ^
  27. About Us – Lorne Seay – Secretary-Treasurer. Virginia AFL-CIO. Accessed March 6, 2021. https://www.va-aflcio.org/about-us/lorne-seay ^
  28. L. Louise Lucas. State of Virginia. Virginia General Assembly. Accessed March 6, 2021. https://apps.senate.virginia.gov/Senator/memberpage.php?id=S19 ^
  29. Home. Delegate Luke Torian. Accessed March 6, 2021. https://delegatetorian.com/ ^
  30. Jeion Ward. VPAP.org. Accessed March 6, 2021. https://www.vpap.org/candidates/67410-jeion-ward/ ^
  31. David W. Marsden. State of Virginia. Virginia General Assembly. Accessed March 6, 2021. https://apps.senate.virginia.gov/Senator/memberpage.php?id=S80 ^
  32. J. Chapman Petersen. State of Virginia. Virginia General Assembly. Accessed March 6, 2021.  https://apps.senate.virginia.gov/Senator/memberpage.php?id=S76 ^
  33. Jeion Ward. VPAP.org. Accessed March 6, 2021. https://www.vpap.org/candidates/67410-jeion-ward/ ^
  34. John S. Edwards. State of Virginia. Virginia General Assembly. Accessed March 6, 2021.   https://apps.senate.virginia.gov/Senator/memberpage.php?id=S45 ^
  35. Virginia AFL-CIO, Return of Organization Exempt From Income Tax (Form 990), 2018, Schedule C, Part 1-c, Line 5. Accessed March 6, 2021. https://990s.foundationcenter.org/990_pdf_archive/540/540419003/540419003_201812_990O.pdf ^
  36. Virginia AFL-CIO, Return of Organization Exempt From Income Tax (Form 990), 2018, Schedule C, Part 1-c, Line 5. Accessed March 6, 2021. https://990s.foundationcenter.org/990_pdf_archive/540/540419003/540419003_201812_990O.pdf ^
  37. Noland, Jack. “Pence, Kaine Share Long Histories in the Fundraising Trenches.” Opensecrets.org. October 4, 2016. Accessed March 13, 2021. https://www.opensecrets.org/news/2016/10/pence-kaine-share-long-histories-in-the-fundraising-trenches/ ^
  38. Expenditures, 2018 Cycle. Bakery, Confectionery, and Tobacco Workers. Open Secrets. Accessed March 14, 2021. https://www.opensecrets.org/PACS/expenditures.php?cmte=C00127621&cycle=2018 ^
  39. Expenditures, 2010 Cycle. Ironmakers Union. Open Secrets. Accessed March 14, 2021. https://www.opensecrets.org/PACs/expenditures.php?cycle=2010&cmte=C00027359 ^
  40. Expenditures, 2012 Cycle. Ironworkers Union. Open Secrets. Accessed March 14, 2021. https://www.opensecrets.org/PACs/expenditures.php?cmte=C00027359&cycle=2012 ^
  41. Expenditures, 2014 Cycle. Ironworkers Union. Open Secrets. Accessed March 14, 2021. https://www.opensecrets.org/PACs/expenditures.php?cmte=C00027359&cycle=2014 ^
  42. Expenditures, 2006 Cycle. Boilermakers Union. Open Secrets. Accessed March 14, 2021. https://www.opensecrets.org/outsidespending/expenditures.php?cmte=C00005157&cycle=2006 ^
  43. Expenditures, 2008 Cycle. Boilermakers Union. Open Secrets. Accessed March 14, 2021. https://www.opensecrets.org/outsidespending/expenditures.php?cmte=C00005157&cycle=2008 ^
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Nonprofit Information

  • Accounting Period: December - November
  • Tax Exemption Received: May 1, 1956

  • Available Filings

    Period Form Type Total revenue Total functional expenses Total assets (EOY) Total liabilities (EOY) Unrelated business income? Total contributions Program service revenue Investment income Comp. of current officers, directors, etc. Form 990
    2018 Dec Form 990 $861,912 $810,413 $858,979 $1,545 N $820,266 $41,335 $311 $155,489 PDF
    2017 Dec Form 990 $875,849 $883,883 $807,935 $2,000 N $835,180 $40,359 $310 $148,159 PDF
    2016 Dec Form 990 $935,027 $879,443 $815,436 $1,467 N $859,635 $55,581 $311 $147,251 PDF
    2015 Dec Form 990 $864,931 $796,665 $759,342 $957 N $829,563 $35,058 $310 $120,223 PDF
    2014 Dec Form 990 $972,151 $771,525 $691,159 $1,040 N $895,843 $58,499 $309 $145,888 PDF
    2013 Dec Form 990 $883,095 $868,488 $490,653 $1,161 N $845,332 $37,432 $331 $227,464 PDF
    2012 Dec Form 990 $926,709 $860,034 $476,050 $1,165 N $881,724 $44,395 $590 $226,610 PDF
    2011 Dec Form 990 $885,728 $902,884 $408,352 $142 N $851,091 $32,500 $898 $222,340 PDF

    Additional Filings (PDFs)

    Virginia AFL-CIO

    5400 GLENSIDE DR STE E
    RICHMOND, VA 23228-3996