Labor Union

Pennsylvania State Education Association (PSEA)

Pennsylvania State Education Association logo as of January 2015 (link)
Website:

www.psea.org/

Location:

HARRISBURG, PA

Tax ID:

23-0961125

Tax-Exempt Status:

501(c)(5)

Budget (2019):

Revenue: $74,610,268
Expenses: $64,508,296
Assets: $137,995,418

Location:

Harrisburg, Pennsylvania

Founded:

1852

President:

Rich Askey

Teachers Unions

The Pennsylvania State Education Association (PSEA) is a left-of-center teachers union affiliated with the National Education Association (NEA), the largest labor union in the United States. Founded in 1852, the union claims to represent nearly 180,000 educators and school support staff in the state of Pennsylvania. [1]

PSEA often supports left-of-center education policy and has become a major force in Pennsylvania politics. The union has become known for its vehement criticism of school choice policies, with PSEA president Rich Askey calling increased school choice funding “the worst attack on public education we’re ever seen.” [2] PSEA has also supported increased unionization efforts across the state [3] During the COVID-19 pandemic, PSEA supported mask mandates and school closures. [4] [5]

Despite claiming to be nonpartisan, PSEA runs its own political action committee, PSEA-PACE, which has contributed more than $14 million to Democratic candidates in Pennsylvania and just $3 million to Republicans in the past 25 years. [6] In 2018 alone, PSEA-PACE was the second largest contributor to the campaign of Gov. Tom Wolf (D), donating more than $1.5 million. [7] PSEA also runs the Fund for Student Success, an independent expenditure committee that directed PSEA’s $500,000 donation to the committee exclusively to PA Alliance Action, a controversial left-progressive “dark money” organization. [8] [9]

PSEA has faced several lawsuits for collecting union dues from nonmembers. In August 2021, Pennsylvania educator David Perrotti filed a federal suit against PSEA and its local affiliate, the Abington Heights Education Association (AHEA), alleging that he received “threatening” letters from AHEA demanding that he pay full union dues for the year that he resigned from the union. [10] In 2019, PSEA faced two additional lawsuits regarding the collection of dues from nonmembers. [11]

In May 2021, PSEA became embroiled in scandal when it came to public notice that federal investigators had opened an inquiry into the Pennsylvania Public School Employees’ Retirement System (PSERS) to evaluate PSERS land purchases and determine whether kickbacks or bribes were connected to increased paycheck deductions for over 90,000 teachers. [12] PSEA officials dismissed the higher withdrawals as a “calculation error,” claiming that it was “disappointed in the process at PSERS” but arguing that “PSERS needs to do everything possible to protect the retirement security [PSEA members] have earned.” [13]

History

The Pennsylvania State Education Association (PSEA) was founded in 1852 as the Pennsylvania State Teachers Association. The union claims that its history is “in many ways the history of public education in Pennsylvania.” [14] Throughout the late 1800s, PSEA pushed for mandatory school attendance requirements and free public education. [15]

In 1920, PSEA adopted a new constitution, establishing the PSEA House of Delegates, which remains the union’s primary governing body. The following year, PSEA took over the Pennsylvania School Journal, a publication covering education issues in Pennsylvania. Throughout the 1930s, PSEA supported teacher tenure laws and other pro-union issues. [16]

PSEA claims to have formally become a union in 1969 when the PSEA president led 20,000 educators in a rally to support striking teachers. In 1970, the state granted collective bargaining rights to teachers, and PSEA continued to push for left-of-center education and personnel policy, supporting early retirement benefits for teachers and increased unionization for support staff while working against school choice programs. [17]

As of 2021, PSEA claims nearly 180,000 members. PSEA was one of the founding members of the National Teachers Association, which has since become the left-of-center National Education Association (NEA). NEA is the largest labor union in the United States, and it remains PSEA’s parent organization. [18]

Political Advocacy

The Pennsylvania State Education Association (PSEA) is a staunch proponent of left-of-center policy, especially in education. Though the union is mainly active in Pennsylvania, it was a supporter of the Biden administration’s American Rescue Plan, a nearly $2 trillion bill which promoted left-of-center policy in the name of COVID-19 relief signed in March 2021. [19]

Anti-Charter School Activism

Most notably, PSEA has vehemently opposed expanded school choice programs, including vouchers and charter schools. [20] In May 2021, state Rep. Andrew Lewis (R-Dauphin) proposed the Excellent Education for All Act, legislation that sought to establish state-funded education savings accounts for children to cover about $6,000 of the cost of homeschooling or private school tuition annually and increase business tax credits for scholarships. The bill also proposed increasing the number of charter schools and protecting “learning pods” set up during the COVID-19 pandemic from state regulation. [21] [22]

PSEA panned the bill, claiming that it would “divert huge amounts of taxpayer dollars from Pennsylvania’s public schools,” though the bill if passed would have no impact on public school revenue from property taxes. PSEA further claimed that the bill would promote a “massive expansion of unaccountable charter schools.” [23] In response to a similar bill proposed in the Pennsylvania Senate, PSEA president Rich Askey claimed that the bill “could be the largest transfer of taxpayer dollars out of public schools in Pennsylvania’s history” and called it “the worst attack on public education we’re ever seen.” [24]

In June 2021, Askey published an opinion piece criticizing the state Senate bill, claiming that school districts were put under pressure by “rising mandated costs for things like charter school tuition.” The opinion piece cast the increases in tax credit programs and charter school funding as “tax breaks for corporations” and claimed that “public education advocates” had “never … even asked for a 68% funding increase – let alone gotten one.” The piece also claimed that taxpayers were placed under the “burden” of charter schools and claimed that charter school tuitions were “one of the largest single expenses for public schools.” [25]

PSEA continued to criticize the bill, even after public schools received an additional $300 million in basic education funding and a $200 million increase in funding allocated to low-income districts in the 2021-22 state budget. [26]

While opposing charter schools, PSEA has called for increased funding for traditional public education. In 2019, PSEA pushed for an increase in the state minimum annual salary for teachers from $18,500 to $45,000, excluding charter-school teachers from the minimum and bypassing the student-weighted school funding formula that allocates funding to districts based on need. When the salary hike failed, PSEA vowed to revive it in later legislative sessions. [27]

Endorsements and Contributions

PSEA runs PSEA-PACE, a political action committee that endorses candidates and makes campaign contributions. PSEA and PSEA-PACE are a major force in Pennsylvania politics, and they side overwhelmingly with Democrats. In the past 25 years, the union has contributed more than $14 million to Democratic candidates in Pennsylvania and just over $3 million to Republicans. [28] In 2016, PSEA itself spent approximately 10 percent of union dues on political expenditures and lobbying. [29]

In 2013, the center-right Commonwealth Foundation published a report detailing PSEA spending. In 2013, PSEA spent $3.8 million on political activities and lobbying, including a $100,000 donation to the left-progressive America Votes, more than $22,000 for PSEA-PACE supplies, and more than $70,000 to the Pennsylvania State AFL-CIO. [30]

The union has continued to fund political efforts in recent years, most notably in support of Gov. Wolf. In 2018 alone, PSEA-PACE was the second largest contributor to Wolf’s campaign, donating more than $1.5 million. Between 2010 and 2016, Gov. Wolf received more money from PSEA-PACE than any other candidate, with donations amounting to $865,000 from the PAC. [31]

Aside from PSEA-PACE, PSEA also runs the Fund for Student Success, an independent expenditure committee. PSEA is the sole funder of the Fund for Student Success, having contributed $500,000 to the PAC. The PAC contributed all $500,000 of PSEA’s donation to PA Alliance Action, a controversial left-progressive “dark money” organization. [32] [33]

Increased Unionization Efforts

PSEA has also pushed for increased unionization in the state. Since January 2021, PSEA has supported unionization efforts among faculty members at HACC, a community college system in central Pennsylvania. PSEA has accused HACC of stalling and dragging out the unionization drive and supported faculty protestors. As of September 2021, PSEA has met with the Pennsylvania Labor Relations Board on behalf of HACC to push for a union at the college. [34]

Even at charter schools, which PSEA has aggressively opposed, PSEA has pushed unionization. In 2021, educators at Propel Schools, a charter school network, officially voted to join PSEA. [35]

Critical Race Theory

PSEA has also endorsed left-of-center policy on race in schools. In September 2021, PSEA supported protestors after Central York High School barred educators from teaching left-wing theories on race by banning a list of books and articles promoting critical race theory. The books promoted race-based reparations, talks given by left-wing academic Ibram X. Kendi, and curriculum promoted by Black Lives Matter at School. [36]

PSEA officials called the bans “offensive” and accused the school of banning “Black voices.” [37] A PSEA spokesperson claimed that the ban on left-wing literature could create a “chilling effect on teachers being able to teach anything about race,” including mainstream topics like the civil rights movement. She further accused the school of “banning PBS, but not the KKK.” [38] Though they have not made a statement in support of critical race theory, PSEA officials have not disavowed its teaching either, and the National Education Association (NEA), its national parent, has come out against attempts to ban its teaching. [39]

COVID-19 Advocacy

The Pennsylvania State Education Association (PSEA) has supported school closures and mask and vaccine mandates during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Support for School Closures

Throughout the pandemic, PSEA consistently advocated for school closures. In July 2020, PSEA called on Gov. Tom Wolf (D) to continue mandating school closures and remote learning for the 2020-2021 school year, rather than proceeding with an in-person opening. [40] After most schools opened in person or on a hybrid model, PSEA continued to call for shutdowns. In November 2020, the union called for a return to full-time remote learning in nearly 40 counties, claiming that increased COVID-19 cases made in-person education unsafe. [41]

In January 2021, PSEA criticized guidance from Gov. Wolf calling on school districts to return elementary school students to classrooms to prevent further learning loss. PSEA alleged that there was “no clear plan to enforce health and safety guidelines,” and urged schools to remain closed once again. The criticism broke from other left-of-center labor unions, such as the Pennsylvania Principals Association, which praised the push for in-person education. [42]

Mask Mandates and Vaccination Campaigns

PSEA has long supported mask mandates for schools, even as vaccination rates have risen across the state. [43] In August 2021, just before the beginning of the school year, PSEA officials released a statement calling masking “essential to keeping in-person learning going” and calling for masks for all staff and students. [44]

Later that month, PSEA praised a request from Gov. Wolf to the Pennsylvania legislature to return early and implement a statewide mask mandate for all schools, despite previously insisting that he would leave the decision up to local districts. [45]

When the legislature refused to grant Gov. Wolf’s request, the Pennsylvania Department of Health issued an order requiring everyone in Pennsylvania schools, including private schools and daycare facilities, to wear a mask at all times. PSEA applauded the order, claiming that there “isn’t a choice between masking or not masking” for schools to remain open. [46]

Aside from mask mandates, PSEA has also supported vaccination efforts. PSEA praised the spring 2021 Pennsylvania effort to vaccinate teachers as “extraordinary” and claimed that it created a path to returning to in-person education. [47]

Standardized Testing Cancellation

PSEA also used the COVID-19 pandemic to push its anti-standardized testing agenda. Even after the Pennsylvania government postponed standardized testing from spring 2021 to fall 2021, citing the impact that the COVID-19 pandemic may have had on learning, PSEA argued that standardized tests should have been waived completely instead and indicated that it had written to the federal government to try to waive testing entirely in January 2021. [48] [49]

Fair-Share Fees Lawsuits

In August 2021, the Pennsylvania State Education Association (PSEA) came under fire for forcing teachers who have resigned union membership to continue to pay so-called “fair-share fees,” or fees charged to union nonmembers allowed by Pennsylvania government-worker labor law before the Janus v. AFSCME decision held government-worker forced-fees arrangements unconstitutional. PSEA’s provisions allow union members to resign membership but only during a two-week window at the end of a collective bargaining agreement, meaning that unions could force members who wished to resign to remain in the union and collect dues for years. [50]

In August 2021, teacher David Perrotti filed a federal suit against PSEA and its local affiliate, the Abington Heights Education Association (AHEA). The suit alleged that Perrotti resigned from the union after 16 years of membership in November 2020, after which he received “threatening” letters from AHEA demanding that he pay full union dues for that year, despite his resignation, because he had missed the alleged window. The Fairness Center, a nonprofit law firm representing Perrotti, has claimed to be aware of at least five other such cases involving AHEA and PSEA. [51]

Perrotti’s suit asked for a permanent injunction barring the union from collecting any further dues from him, and challenged the Pennsylvania statutes regarding “fair-share fees” and resignation periods. Perrotti claims that these laws violate the U.S. Supreme Court decision in Janus v. AFSCME, which bars government employee unions from forcing fees onto nonmembers. The case has not been decided as of September 2021. [52]

The case mirrors a similar lawsuit brought against PSEA in 2019 by Chris Meier and Jane Ladley, educators who are not members of PSEA, who argued that the union barred them from using a provision that allowed nonmembers to steer fair-share fees to a charity of their choice, provided that the nonmembers were religious objectors and the union approved of the charity. PSEA did not approve their choices of charities, which included a civics education group and an organization that fights to allow public employees to opt out of unions. [53] As of 2021, the case is still being litigated. [54]

PSERS Scandal

In May 2021, the Pennsylvania State Education Association (PSEA) was rocked by scandal when news outlets reported that the Pennsylvania Public School Employees’ Retirement System (PSERS) was being investigated by the federal government. The investigation was said to be looking into whether kickbacks or bribes might be connected to the withdrawal of an exaggerated profit report, which prompted increased paycheck deductions for over 90,000 teachers. The investigation was also reportedly investigating PSERS land purchases. [55]

The PSERS board admitted to endorsing an inflated number on its returns, though it blamed a data error for the discrepancies. Around the same time as the announcement, the FBI reportedly began looking into Harrisburg real estate purchases by PSERS after investment staff disclosed that they were also being paid by a firm to manage its Harrisburg real estate. PSERS claimed that the forms were poorly worded and denied wrongdoing. [56]

In response to the investigation, PSEA dismissed the higher withdrawals as a “calculation error,” claiming that it was “disappointed in the process at PSERS” which led to the error. The union further claimed that it was “important to remember that PSEA members contribute to their pension fund,” arguing that as a result, “PSERS needs to do everything possible to protect the retirement security they have earned.” The investigation has not been concluded publicly as of September 2021. [57]

People and Funding

In 2018, the Pennsylvania State Education Association (PSEA) reported $74,610,268 in revenue, $64,508,296 in expenses, and $72,265,147 in net assets. [58] Nearly all of its funding came from membership dues, with the union taking in more than $64 million in dues, though it also received over $5.6 million from the National Education Association (NEA).

Rich Askey is the president of PSEA. Askey is a music teacher from Harrisburg, Pennsylvania who has worked in union organizing for decades. Prior to becoming PSEA president, Askey was the PSEA Southern Region treasurer and president-elect. Askey also held roles as PSEA vice president and treasurer before becoming president. At the national level, Askey sat on the NEA board of directors for five years. [59]

Askey has made more than 70 small political contributions since 2008, all to left-of-center candidates and committees including 2020 presidential campaign of Joe Biden (D), the NEA Fund for Children and Public Education, and ActBlue. [60]

References

  1. “History.” Pennsylvania State Education Association. Accessed September 16, 2021. https://www.psea.org/about-psea/mission–history/the-psea-story/. ^
  2. Sweitzer, Justin. “Senate GOP Seeks to Expand Tax Credits for Educational Scholarships.” City & State PA. June 8, 2021. https://www.cityandstatepa.com/content/senate-gop-seeks-expand-tax-credits-educational-scholarships. ^
  3. Goldstein, Andrew. “Propel Charter School Staff Votes to Form Union.” Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. September 14, 2021. https://www.post-gazette.com/news/education/2021/04/29/Propel-Schools-charter-staff-votes-form-union-education-unionize-labor/stories/202104290171. ^
  4. “State Education Association Recommends Mask-Wearing at All Pa. Schools.” Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. September 14, 2021. https://www.post-gazette.com/news/education/2021/08/18/pa-Pennsylvania-State-education-association-recommends-mask-wearing-schools-health/stories/202108180110. ^
  5. Hatmaker, Julia. “As COVID-19 Surges, Teachers Union Calls for Remote-Only Classes in Some Pa. Counties.” Pennlive.com. November 11, 2020. https://www.pennlive.com/news/2020/11/as-covid-19-surges-teachers-union-calls-for-remote-only-classes-in-some-pa-counties.html ^
  6. Mooney, Kevin. “Teachers Go to Court to Fight Union Over Choice of Charities.” The Daily Signal. January 7, 2020. https://www.dailysignal.com/2020/01/07/teachers-go-to-court-to-fight-union-over-choice-of-charities/. ^
  7. Mooney, Kevin. “Union Donations to Gov. Wolf Drown out School Choice.” Commonwealth Foundation. October 23, 2019. https://www.commonwealthfoundation.org/policyblog/detail/union-donations-to-gov-wolf-drown-out-school-choice. ^
  8. “Fund for Student Success: Expenditures, 2018 Cycle.” OpenSecrets.org. Accessed September 16, 2021. https://www.opensecrets.org/527s/527cmtedetail_expends.php?ein=831322288&cycle=2018. ^
  9. Herring, An-Li. “‘Dark Money’ Playing Role in North Hills Senate Race, and Contests Statewide.” WESA. November 2, 2018. https://www.wesa.fm/politics-government/2018-10-31/dark-money-playing-role-in-north-hills-senate-race-and-contests-statewide. ^
  10. Mooney, Kevin. “Teacher Sues Union That Demands He Pay Dues for Months after He Left.” The Federalist. August 18, 2021. https://thefederalist.com/2021/08/18/teacher-sues-union-that-demands-he-pay-dues-for-almost-a-year-after-he-resigned/. ^
  11. Ladley v. Psea.” The Fairness Center. June 11, 2021. https://www.fairnesscenter.org/cases/ladley-v-psea/. ^
  12. Eldredge, Ryan. “Transparency Lawyer Hired as Pa Teacher Retirement System Investigation Continues.” WHP. May 28, 2021. https://local21news.com/news/local/transparency-lawyer-hired-as-pa-teacher-retirement-system-investigation-continues. ^
  13. Eldredge, Ryan. “Transparency Lawyer Hired as Pa Teacher Retirement System Investigation Continues.” WHP. May 28, 2021. https://local21news.com/news/local/transparency-lawyer-hired-as-pa-teacher-retirement-system-investigation-continues. ^
  14. “History.” Pennsylvania State Education Association. Accessed September 16, 2021. https://www.psea.org/about-psea/mission–history/the-psea-story/. ^
  15. “History.” Pennsylvania State Education Association. Accessed September 16, 2021. https://www.psea.org/about-psea/mission–history/the-psea-story/. ^
  16. “History.” Pennsylvania State Education Association. Accessed September 16, 2021. https://www.psea.org/about-psea/mission–history/the-psea-story/. ^
  17. “History.” Pennsylvania State Education Association. Accessed September 16, 2021. https://www.psea.org/about-psea/mission–history/the-psea-story/. ^
  18. “History.” Pennsylvania State Education Association. Accessed September 16, 2021. https://www.psea.org/about-psea/mission–history/the-psea-story/. ^
  19. “American Rescue Plan.” Pennsylvania State Education Association. Accessed September 16, 2021. https://www.psea.org/issues-action/key-issues/key-issue-school-funding/american-rescue-plan/. ^
  20. Murphy, Jan. “Pa. Lawmaker Calls His School Choice Bill a ‘Game Changer’ with Its Focus on Students, Not Systems.” Pennlive.com. August 20, 2021. https://www.pennlive.com/news/2021/08/pa-lawmaker-calls-his-school-choice-bill-a-game-changer-with-its-focus-on-students-not-systems.html. ^
  21. Murphy, Jan. “Pa. Lawmaker Calls His School Choice Bill a ‘Game Changer’ with Its Focus on Students, Not Systems.” Pennlive.com. August 20, 2021. https://www.pennlive.com/news/2021/08/pa-lawmaker-calls-his-school-choice-bill-a-game-changer-with-its-focus-on-students-not-systems.html. ^
  22. Mooney, Kevin. “Demand after Covid-19 Sparks School Choice Proposals in Pennsylvania.” The Daily Signal. June 2, 2021. https://www.dailysignal.com/2021/05/19/demand-after-covid-19-sparks-school-choice-proposals-in-pennsylvania/. ^
  23. Murphy, Jan. “Pa. Lawmaker Calls His School Choice Bill a ‘Game Changer’ with Its Focus on Students, Not Systems.” Pennlive.com. August 20, 2021. https://www.pennlive.com/news/2021/08/pa-lawmaker-calls-his-school-choice-bill-a-game-changer-with-its-focus-on-students-not-systems.html. ^
  24. Sweitzer, Justin. “Senate GOP Seeks to Expand Tax Credits for Educational Scholarships.” City & State PA. June 8, 2021. https://www.cityandstatepa.com/content/senate-gop-seeks-expand-tax-credits-educational-scholarships. ^
  25. Askey, Rich. “Op-Ed: ‘Just about the Worst Attack on Public Education We’ve Ever Seen.’” Erie Times-News. June 13, 2021. https://www.goerie.com/story/opinion/2021/06/13/op-ed-sb-1-would-take-taxpayer-dollars-out-pa-public-schools/7657324002. ^
  26. Parish, Marley. “‘We’re Still in The Game:’ Gov. Wolf Celebrates $40.8 Billion State Budget.” Pennsylvania Capital-Star. July 2, 2021. http://levittownnow.com/2021/07/01/were-still-in-the-game-gov-wolf-celebrates-40-8-billion-state-budget/. ^
  27. Wolfman-Arent, Avi, and Ed Mahon. “Seven Big Takeaways for Education in the New PA. Budget.” WHYY. June 29, 2019. https://whyy.org/articles/seven-big-takeaways-for-education-in-the-new-pa-budget/. ^
  28. Mooney, Kevin. “Teachers Go to Court to Fight Union Over Choice of Charities.” The Daily Signal. January 7, 2020. https://www.dailysignal.com/2020/01/07/teachers-go-to-court-to-fight-union-over-choice-of-charities/. ^
  29. “PSEA Spends 10 Percent of Member Dues on Politics: Letter.” Lehigh Valley Express-Times. March 29, 2016. https://www.lehighvalleylive.com/opinion/2016/03/psea_spends_10_percent_of_unio.html ^
  30. Abraham, Priya. “PSEA Pours $3.8 Million into Politics.” Commonwealth Foundation. December 9, 2013. https://www.commonwealthfoundation.org/policyblog/detail/psea-pours-38-million-into-politics. ^
  31. Mooney, Kevin. “Union Donations to Gov. Wolf Drown out School Choice.” Commonwealth Foundation. October 23, 2019. https://www.commonwealthfoundation.org/policyblog/detail/union-donations-to-gov-wolf-drown-out-school-choice. ^
  32. “Fund for Student Success: Expenditures, 2018 Cycle.” OpenSecrets.org. Accessed September 16, 2021. https://www.opensecrets.org/527s/527cmtedetail_expends.php?ein=831322288&cycle=2018. ^
  33. Herring, An-Li. “‘Dark Money’ Playing Role in North Hills Senate Race, and Contests Statewide.” WESA. November 2, 2018. https://www.wesa.fm/politics-government/2018-10-31/dark-money-playing-role-in-north-hills-senate-race-and-contests-statewide. ^
  34. Gleiter, Sue. “HACC Faculty Hold Protest on Labor Day in Support of Unionization.” Pennlive.com. September 7, 2021. https://www.pennlive.com/news/2021/09/hacc-faculty-hold-protest-on-labor-day-in-support-of-unionization.html. ^
  35. Goldstein, Andrew. “Propel Charter School Staff Votes to Form Union.” Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. September 14, 2021. https://www.post-gazette.com/news/education/2021/04/29/Propel-Schools-charter-staff-votes-form-union-education-unionize-labor/stories/202104290171. ^
  36. Panyard, Jack. “Book Ban by Central York School Board of Racial Justice Materials Spurs Student Protests.” York Daily Record. September 10, 2021. https://www.ydr.com/story/news/2021/09/10/racial-justice-central-york-students-protesting-school-board-book-ban/8259508002/. ^
  37. Panyard, Jack. “Book Ban by Central York School Board of Racial Justice Materials Spurs Student Protests.” York Daily Record. September 10, 2021. https://www.ydr.com/story/news/2021/09/10/racial-justice-central-york-students-protesting-school-board-book-ban/8259508002/. ^
  38. Locurto, Tina. “‘Afraid to Teach’: One Pennsylvania High School’s Book Ban List Targets Black, Latino Authors.” The Morning Call. September 1, 2021. https://www.mcall.com/news/pennsylvania/mc-nws-pa-banned-book-list-20210901-tir7s7uhbjdgzi5hadj2k3mr4u-story.html. ^
  39. “Letter to the Editor: NEA’S Critical Race Theory Push.” Pittsburgh Tribune-Review, July 30, 2021. https://triblive.com/opinion/letter-to-the-editor-neas-critical-race-theory-push/. ^
  40. WJAC Staff. “PA State Education Association Urges Gov. Wolf to Plan for Online Teaching for Schools.” WJAC. July 22, 2020. https://wjactv.com/news/local/pa-state-education-association-urges-gov-wolf-to-plan-for-online-teaching-for-schools. ^
  41. Hatmaker, Julia. “As COVID-19 Surges, Teachers Union Calls for Remote-Only Classes in Some Pa. Counties.” Pennlive.com. November 11, 2020. https://www.pennlive.com/news/2020/11/as-covid-19-surges-teachers-union-calls-for-remote-only-classes-in-some-pa-counties.html. ^
  42. Southwick, Ron. “Pa. Teachers Union Criticizes Guidance Calling for Elementary Students to Go Back to Classrooms.” Pennlive.com. January 8, 2021. https://www.pennlive.com/news/2021/01/pa-teachers-union-criticizes-guidance-calling-for-elementary-students-to-go-back-to-classrooms.html. ^
  43. “State Education Association Recommends Mask-Wearing at All Pa. Schools.” Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. September 14, 2021. https://www.post-gazette.com/news/education/2021/08/18/pa-Pennsylvania-State-education-association-recommends-mask-wearing-schools-health/stories/202108180110. ^
  44. “State Education Association Recommends Mask-Wearing at All Pa. Schools.” Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. September 14, 2021. https://www.post-gazette.com/news/education/2021/08/18/pa-Pennsylvania-State-education-association-recommends-mask-wearing-schools-health/stories/202108180110. ^
  45. Sweitzer, Justin. “The Battle over Masks Continues as Lawmakers Reject Statewide Mandate.” City & State PA. August 26, 2021. https://www.cityandstatepa.com/content/battle-over-masks-continues-lawmakers-reject-statewide-mandate. ^
  46. Routh, Julian. “‘We Have to Act Now’: Gov. Wolf Mandates Masks in K-12 Schools, Day Care Centers.” Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. September 14, 2021. https://www.post-gazette.com/news/education/2021/08/31/Pennsylvania-masks-mandate-K-12-schools-day-care-centers-covid-19-governor-tom-wolf/stories/202108310112. ^
  47. Smith, Christen. “PA Completes Teacher Vaccination Effort.” LevittownNow.com. April 5, 2021. http://levittownnow.com/2021/04/04/pa-completes-teacher-vaccination-effort/. ^
  48. DeJesus, Ivey. “Critical Race Theory: What It Is, What It Isn’t, and What It Means for Education in Pennsylvania.” Pennlive.com. July 15, 2021. https://www.pennlive.com/news/2021/07/critical-race-theory-the-nationwide-debate-is-emerging-in-pennsylvania.html. ^
  49. Wolfman-Arent, Avi. “Pa. Says It Will Allow Public Schools to Postpone Standardized Tests until Fall.” WHYY. February 24, 2021. https://whyy.org/articles/pa-says-it-will-allow-public-schools-to-postpone-standardized-tests-until-fall/. ^
  50. Mooney, Kevin. “Teacher Sues Union That Demands He Pay Dues for Months after He Left.” The Federalist. August 18, 2021. https://thefederalist.com/2021/08/18/teacher-sues-union-that-demands-he-pay-dues-for-almost-a-year-after-he-resigned/. ^
  51. Mooney, Kevin. “Teacher Sues Union That Demands He Pay Dues for Months after He Left.” The Federalist. August 18, 2021. https://thefederalist.com/2021/08/18/teacher-sues-union-that-demands-he-pay-dues-for-almost-a-year-after-he-resigned/. ^
  52. Mooney, Kevin. “Teacher Sues Union That Demands He Pay Dues for Months after He Left.” The Federalist. August 18, 2021. https://thefederalist.com/2021/08/18/teacher-sues-union-that-demands-he-pay-dues-for-almost-a-year-after-he-resigned/. ^
  53. Mooney, Kevin. “Teachers Go to Court to Fight Union Over Choice of Charities.” The Daily Signal. January 7, 2020. https://www.dailysignal.com/2020/01/07/teachers-go-to-court-to-fight-union-over-choice-of-charities/. ^
  54. “Ladley v. PSEA.” The Fairness Center. June 11, 2021. https://www.fairnesscenter.org/cases/ladley-v-psea/. ^
  55. Eldredge, Ryan. “Transparency Lawyer Hired as Pa Teacher Retirement System Investigation Continues.” WHP. May 28, 2021. https://local21news.com/news/local/transparency-lawyer-hired-as-pa-teacher-retirement-system-investigation-continues. ^
  56. Deppen, Colin. “Money, Power, Scandal: The PSERS Saga, Explained.” York Dispatch. June 21, 2021. https://www.yorkdispatch.com/story/news/local/pennsylvania/2021/06/19/money-power-scandal-psers-saga-explained/7753111002/. ^
  57. Eldredge, Ryan. “Transparency Lawyer Hired as Pa Teacher Retirement System Investigation Continues.” WHP. May 28, 2021. https://local21news.com/news/local/transparency-lawyer-hired-as-pa-teacher-retirement-system-investigation-continues. ^
  58. Pennsylvania State Education Association, Return of Organization Exempt from Income Tax (Form 990), 2018. ^
  59. “PSEA President.” Pennsylvania state Education Association. Accessed September 16, 2021. https://www.psea.org/about-psea/leadership/psea-officers/psea-president2/. ^
  60. “Browse Individual Contributions: Rich Askey.” Federal Election Commission. Accessed September 16, 2021. https://www.fec.gov/data/receipts/individual-contributions/?contributor_name=rich%2BAskey&contributor_employer=%09HARRISBURG%2BSCHOOL%2BDISTRICT&two_year_transaction_period=2008&min_date=01%2F01%2F2000&max_date=12%2F31%2F2022. ^
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Nonprofit Information

  • Accounting Period: August - July
  • Tax Exemption Received: February 1, 1938

  • Available Filings

    Period Form Type Total revenue Total functional expenses Total assets (EOY) Total liabilities (EOY) Unrelated business income? Total contributions Program service revenue Investment income Comp. of current officers, directors, etc. Form 990
    2019 Aug Form 990 $74,610,268 $64,508,296 $137,995,418 $65,730,271 Y $0 $70,385,501 $3,231,041 $3,625,749 PDF
    2018 Aug Form 990 $74,729,915 $65,486,937 $126,885,279 $38,166,832 Y $0 $71,216,217 $1,981,139 $3,744,694
    2017 Aug Form 990 $71,016,720 $66,490,949 $115,876,015 $62,797,804 Y $0 $69,889,992 $1,286,979 $3,725,385 PDF
    2016 Aug Form 990 $71,503,615 $64,221,953 $107,191,751 $90,629,172 Y $0 $69,148,261 $1,625,142 $3,570,603
    2015 Aug Form 990 $70,341,973 $65,102,301 $99,774,347 $69,981,611 Y $0 $68,270,354 $1,362,949 $3,838,242 PDF
    2014 Aug Form 990 $69,162,958 $58,291,930 $95,980,324 $46,975,037 Y $0 $67,071,482 $876,328 $3,572,597 PDF
    2013 Aug Form 990 $68,221,412 $63,723,682 $85,564,670 $60,828,160 Y $0 $66,209,362 $1,277,477 $3,753,014 PDF
    2012 Aug Form 990 $68,668,603 $59,437,805 $78,933,641 $87,222,320 Y $0 $66,334,516 $1,074,561 $3,298,793 PDF
    2011 Aug Form 990 $66,258,763 $59,340,482 $77,665,781 $71,607,813 Y $0 $63,880,298 $1,601,535 $3,086,206 PDF

    Additional Filings (PDFs)

    Pennsylvania State Education Association (PSEA)

    400 N 3RD ST
    HARRISBURG, PA 17101-1346