Labor Union

Michigan Education Association (MEA)

Website:

www.mea.org

Location:

EAST LANSING, MI

Tax ID:

38-0827000

Tax-Exempt Status:

501(c)(5)

Budget (2017):

Revenue: $60,354,655
Expenses: $70,932,788
Assets: $62,635,863

The Michigan Education Association (MEA) is a National Education Association-affiliated state-level federation of teachers’ unions in Michigan. The MEA is one of Michigan’s largest labor unions and claims to represent “about 120,000 teachers, education support professionals and higher-education employees throughout the state,”[1] although that number is disputed due to membership declines in past years. [2] According to its 2019 federal Department of Labor filings, MEA had 115,472 members, of whom 36,642 are retirees. [3]

The MEA has a long history of opposing school choice options for parents and children, particularly with regard to non-public schools. [4] The MEA also lobbies for left-of center policies and supports, almost exclusively, Democratic Party candidates for public office despite national surveys showing 30 percent of teachers identify politically as independents and 27 percent as Republicans. [5] [6]

History

The Michigan Education Association was formed in 1852 as the Michigan State Teachers Association in Ypsilanti, Michigan. [7] The MEA grew in political clout and won gains in salaries, benefits, and job security for their members by the 1970s through aggressive strikes. Between 1967 and 1980 there were 454 teachers’ strikes against public school districts in Michigan, an average of almost 35 per year. [8]

By the 1980s, the MEA was donating millions per year to Democratic Party candidates for state offices and was identified as one of the two most powerful lobbying organizations in the state by the Inside Michigan Politics newsletter. [9]

The political power of the MEA was confronted in 1990 with the election of Republican Governor John Engler. Engler succeeded in enacting a law that prohibited teacher strikes, but failed in an effort to pass pension reform legislation to ensure future solvency of the teacher retirement fund. [10]

By 2009, membership had grown to over 120,000 public school teachers and other public school and university employees. After Michigan became a right-to-work state in 2012 and allowed public school teachers to refrain from funding labor unions, MEA membership continued to decline. By 2018, the MEA represented 84,872 active members. [11] [12]

Health Care Controversy

The Michigan Education Association created an affiliated health care service administrator in 1960 named the Michigan Educational Special Services Administration (MESSA). [13] The MEA negotiates contracts with elected school boards that designate MESSA as the health care provider for school employees. A portion of revenues received by MESSA are turned over to the MEA. This relationship has been criticized as a mechanism for channeling tax dollars into the MEA’s operations and for inflating the cost of teacher health care. [14] [15] [16]

Because MESSA is the only allowable health care provider under many contracts, MESSA can charge much larger fees for health services than market competitors. These higher fees generate revenue for the MEA at a cost to taxpayers and other public education services. MESSA also subcontracts with other health insurance providers to provide health care services to which MESSA adds a fee, which is more costly than school districts directly contracting with the other health care providers without MESSA as an intermediary. [17] [18]

Issue Advocacy

Service Privatization

The Michigan Education Association has been criticized for opposing privatization of services in school districts, such as bus drivers and janitorial services[19] while using subcontracted services for their own union’s janitorial needs. [20]

School Choice

The Michigan Education Association has led opposition to school choice in Michigan for decades. [21] In 2000, an unsuccessful ballot initiative led by Grand Rapids, Michigan-based philanthropists Dick and Betsy DeVos would have amended the state constitution to allow parents with children in underperforming public schools to use a voucher to send their children to a private school. [22] The MEA, its members and affiliates, played a lead role in funding opposition to the ballot initiative. [23] [24] [25]

Pension Reform

Pensions for Michigan schoolteachers are paid from a state fund backed by taxpayers. By the late 1990s, this fund became significantly underfunded due to generous retirement benefits being provided without an adequate source to fund those benefits.

In 1996, Michigan reformed the pension system for state employees by requiring all new employees to be part of a 401(k)-style retirement plan that required pensions to be funded through contributions during the term of employees’ working years. These annual contributions would be invested so the fund would grow enough to pay for an employee’s retirement costs. This reform was intended to fund pensions more sustainably than the previous policy, which promised pension benefits without an adequate funding mechanism. The 1996 reform applied to all state employees except public schoolteachers due to intense opposition by the Michigan Education Association and other public teachers’ unions. [26] The MEA was criticized by academic analysts in 1998 because it “failed to advance a politically viable alternative to the reform strategies favored by their adversaries. Their energies are largely devoted to protecting their members against erosion in their economic position.” [27]

Partially as a result of being excluded from the 1996 reforms, the unfunded liability for teacher pensions grew rapidly. The amount available to pay for teachers’ retirement and retiree health care was far short of the cost of those benefits, which put retirement benefits at risk of being reduced or taxpayers being required to bail out the system. Despite minor reforms enacted by the state legislature in 2010, the unfunded liability (the amount owed to pay pensions that exceed the amount available to pay pensions) reached over $14 billion plus another $29 billion shortfall for promised retirement health care. [28] [29] [30] [31]

In 2017, Republicans controlled the state House and Senate, as well as the Governor’s office and sought to address the growing insolvency of the public teacher retirement fund.  Despite opposition from the MEA and Democratic lawmakers, reforms were enacted that provided more retirement plan options for existing teachers but required new hires to enroll in 401(k)-style retirement plans that were funded by contributions from the employee and the employer. [32][33] These contributions were calculated to provide adequate funding for the employee’s retirement instead of adding to the exiting retirement fund debt. [34]

Labor Advocacy

Michigan Proposal 2 of 2012

The Michigan Education Association donated over $2.5 million to support an unsuccessful state constitutional amendment proposal on the 2012 election ballot in Michigan. [35] The proposed amendment, designated as “Proposal 2”, would have constitutionally established union collective bargaining contracts as the supreme law of the state by invalidating any state laws or regulations that conflict or restrict labor contracts. Proposal 2 would also prevent Michigan from becoming a “right-to-work” state in which public schoolteachers could legally refrain from paying union fees. [36] [37]

The MEA promoted the measure as protecting higher-wage jobs and securing safe working conditions while opponents portrayed it as a labor union power grab that would make it impossible to correct excesses in labor union contracts. A free-market state think tank, the Mackinac Center for Public Policy, opposed the measure and exposed excesses in union contracts during the campaign. One such exposure that gained attention was a MEA union contract with the Bay City Public Schools, which allowed teachers to come to school drunk five times or be caught selling drugs to students twice before they could be fired. [38]

Proposal 2 was rejected by voters by a 58% – 42% margin. [39]

Right-to-Work

The failure of the MEA-backed Proposal 2 greatly emboldened advocates of making Michigan a “right-to-work” (RTW) state; right-to-work legislation allows individual workers, including teachers, to choose to drop out of a union and refrain from paying union dues. [40]

Prior to the Proposal 2 campaign by the MEA and other unions, then-Michigan Governor Rick Snyder (R) had vocally opposed RTW. The Republican Party had retained majorities in both the state House and Senate despite President Barack Obama winning Michigan during his 2012 reelection campaign. Within a month of Proposal 2’s failure, Governor Snyder announced that right-to-work was “on the agenda”. [41]

The Republican executive of Michigan’s second-largest county, Oakland County Executive L. Brooks Patterson, said Michigan’s drive for right-to-work appeared motivated by the MEA and other unions’ push for Proposal 2, which he called “a greedy move” and stated, “I don’t know where any union has gone that far in any state.” [42] Then-State Senate Majority Leader Randy Richardville (R-Monroe) believed the governor was forced to consider RTW because unions had pushed Proposal 2. [43]

In the week between Snyder’s announcement of support for a right-to-work law and its legislative passage, thousands of demonstrators were bused to Michigan’s Capitol Building in Lansing by labor unions. [44] MEA President Steve Cook encouraged his members to participate in the protests, writing “This Tuesday, we expect thousands of our coalition partners to be at the Capitol.  Everyone from the UAW, Steelworkers, Communication Workers, Nurses, Laborers, Electrical workers, including MEA and MFT members will be there – just as they were last Thursday. Join us, and tell Governor Snyder and your legislators what you think about right-to-work. Tell them what you think about legalized freeloading.  Come and meet the thousands of others members of the labor coalition that MEA is very proud to belong to.” [45]

The protests became violent. State troopers in riot gear attempted to keep order, with limited success. According to multiple media reports, labor union-aligned protestors broke into state buildings, attempted to pull a state trooper off her horse and into the crowd, and engaged in fist fights with right-to-work supporters. [46]

A tent set up on the State Capitol lawn by Americans For Prosperity-Michigan, a right-of-center group supporting RTW, was attacked and dismantled by union activists. Several people in wheelchairs were trapped under the destroyed tent. Police officers attempting to rescue the trapped individuals were blocked and heckled by union protesters, but were able to help the victims escape safely. [47] [48]

The conflicts resulted in periodic shutdowns of the State Capitol due to overcapacity and concerns for public safety. [49]

The legislation moved through both the House and the Senate. On December 11, Governor Snyder signed the bill into law. [50]

Michigan Education Association President Steve Cook pledged to fight the new RTW law by “any legal means” to prevent teachers from choosing to leave the union. [51] School employees who left the union reportedly faced extensive harassment by the MEA, including attacks on their reputations, union visits to their classrooms, being listed in union publications, and new union contracts that required dues for another 10 years. [52] [53]

Passage of right-to-work has contributed to significant declines in MEA membership and dues. The MEA allegedly hired collection agencies to increase dues collection from past and current members and threatened lawsuits against individuals who decline to pay. [54] In 2017, the MEA lost a lawsuit brought against them by teachers whose right to leave the union was being stifled by MEA actions and policies. The MEA was required by the court to admit to engaging in unfair labor practices. By September of 2017, more than 32,000 teachers and other public school employee had chosen to leave the MEA, reducing the union’s dues-paying membership by 27% since passage of the right-to-work law. [55]

Taxpayer-Funded Union Work

The MEA has faced criticism for having full-time MEA organizers paid by public school districts despite having no teaching duties. The MEA negotiates contracts with local school districts that require taxpayers to pay the salaries and pension contributions of select individuals who work exclusively on behalf of the union rather than the school district. [56] [57] [58]

Financials

The MEA reported revenues of $58,512,912 in 2017, mostly from membership dues. Expenditures for 2017 were reported as $65,622,691, resulting in a one-year negative balance of $7,109,779. Total fiscal liabilities subtracted from total assets resulted in a net fund balance of -$176,271,935 in 2017. [59]

The MEA supports Democratic Party candidates almost exclusively, with its committees spending $2.4 million on candidates, Democratic Party organizations, and left-of-center groups in 2018. [60] MEA spending on political campaigns has declined by almost 50% between 2012 and 2016. The amount the MEA collects annually per teacher has also declined, falling from $761 in 2011 to $564 in 2016. Both these declines have been attributed to the 2012 right-to-work law that allowed teachers to choose whether to pay fees to the union rather than requiring them to do so. [61]

References

  1. Michigan Education Association. MEA.org. “About Us”. Accessed April 27, 2020. https://mea.org/about-us/ ^
  2. Skorup, Jarrett. “School employees dump Michigan Education Association in droves”. Dearborn-Dearborn Heights Times Herald. January 26, 2019. Accessed April 27, 2020. https://www.downriversundaytimes.com/2019/01/26/school-employees-dump-michigan-education-association-in-droves/ ^
  3. Michigan Education Association (DOL File Number 512-840), Annual Report of a Labor Organization (Form LM-2), 2019, Schedule 13 https://olms.dol-esa.gov/query/orgReport.do?rptId=712343&rptForm=LM2Form ^
  4. Herbart, Paula. “Labor Voices: No public tax dollars for private schools”. MEA.org. August 14, 2018. Accessed April 27, 2020. https://www.mea.org/labor-voices-no-public-tax-dollars-for-private-schools/ ^
  5. Gantert, Tom. “Dems Get 99.9 Percent of 2018 Teacher Union Political Cash”. Capitol Confidential. June 21, 2018. Accessed April 27, 2020. https://www.michigancapitolconfidential.com/dems-get-999-percent-of-2018-teacher-union-political-cash ^
  6. Klein, Alyson. “Survey: Educators’ Political Leanings, Who They Voted For, Where They Stand on Key Issues”. Education Week. September 12, 2017. Accessed April 27, 2020. https://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2017/12/13/survey-paints-political-portrait-of-americas-k-12.html ^
  7. Michigan Education Association. MEA.org. “About Us”. Accessed April 27, 2020. https://mea.org/about-us/ ^
  8. Boyd, William Lowe; Plank, David N.; Sykes, Gary. “Teachers’ Unions in Hard Times”. Paper prepared for the conference on “Teachers’ Unions and Educational Reform” held at the Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University. September 24-25, 1998. Accessed April 27, 2020. http://www.educ.msu.edu/epc/forms/union.pdf ^
  9. Boyd, William Lowe; Plank, David N.; Sykes, Gary. “Teachers’ Unions in Hard Times”. Paper prepared for the conference on “Teachers’ Unions and Educational Reform” held at the Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University. September 24-25, 1998. Accessed April 27, 2020.  http://www.educ.msu.edu/epc/forms/union.pdf ^
  10. Boyd, William Lowe; Plank, David N.; Sykes, Gary. “Teachers’ Unions in Hard Times”. Paper prepared for the conference on “Teachers’ Unions and Educational Reform” held at the Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University. September 24-25, 1998. Accessed April 27, 2020. http://www.educ.msu.edu/epc/forms/union.pdf ^
  11. Skorup, Jarrett. “School employees dump Michigan Education Association in droves”. Dearborn-Dearborn Heights Times Herald. January 26, 2019. Accessed April 27, 2020.  https://www.downriversundaytimes.com/2019/01/26/school-employees-dump-michigan-education-association-in-droves/ ^
  12. VanderKolk, Kevin. “Skubick: MEA membership falls since Right to Work law passes”. WNLS. September 25, 2017. Accessed April 27, 2020. https://www.wlns.com/news/skubick-mea-membership-falls-since-right-to-work-law-passes/ ^
  13. Michigan Educational Special Services Administration. Messa.org. “About”. Accessed April 27, 2020. https://www.messa.org/about#mission ^
  14. Bockelman, Andrew; Overton, Joseph P. “Michigan Education Special Services Association: The MEA’s Money Machine”. Mackinac Center for Public Policy. Mackinac.org. November 1, 1993. Accessed April 27, 2020. https://www.mackinac.org/S1993-10 ^
  15. Myers, Debbi S. “We can do better than MEA plan”. MLive. February 15, 2009. Accessed April 27, 2020. https://www.mlive.com/opinion/jackson/2009/02/we_can_do_better_than_mea_plan.html ^
  16. National Right To Work Committee. “Big Labor Choosing Profiteering over Teachers’ Jobs” December 24, 2011. Accessed April 27, 2020. https://nrtwc.org/big-labor-profiteering-or-union-jobs-2/ ^
  17. O’Neil, Ted. “School Boards and Teachers Should Address Their Own Insurance Issues”. Mackinac Center for Public Policy. Mackinac.org. February 15, 2007. Accessed April 27, 2020. https://www.mackinac.org/8257 ^
  18. Van Beek, Michael. “Michigan Public School Health Insurance Costs Soar Above National Trends”. Capitol Confidential. September 9, 2010. Accessed April 27, 2020. https://www.michigancapitolconfidential.com/13522 ^
  19. Michigan Education Association. “Ishpeming Bus Drivers Celebrate Win over Privatization”. Mea.org. March 16, 2017.  Accessed April 27, 2020. https://mea.org/ishpeming-bus-drivers-celebrate-win-over-privatization/ ^
  20. Gilroy, Leonard. “School District Calls Out MEA on Bogus Privatization Claims”. Reason Foundation. Reason.org. “Commentary”. August 23, 2009.  Accessed April 27, 2020. https://reason.org/commentary/school-district-calls-out-mea/ ^
  21. Herbart, Paula. “Labor Voices: No public tax dollars for private schools”. Detroit News. August 13, 2018. Accessed April 27, 2020. https://www.detroitnews.com/story/opinion/columnists/labor-voices/2018/08/13/no-public-tax-dollars-private-schools/975834002/ ^
  22. Ballotpedia. “Michigan Vouchers and Teacher Testing Amendment, Proposal 1 (2000)”. Accessed April 27, 2020. https://ballotpedia.org/Michigan_Vouchers_and_Teacher_Testing_Amendment,_Proposal_1_(2000) ^
  23. Walsh. Mark. “Voucher Initiatives Defeated In Calif., Mich.”. Education Week. November 15, 2000. Accessed April 27, 2020. https://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2000/11/15/11vouch.h20.html ^
  24. Brouillette, Matthew. “Engler Denies Support to 2000 Voucher Plan”. Mackinac Center for Public Policy. Mackinac.org. October 19, 1999. Accessed April 27, 2020. https://www.mackinac.org/2495 ^
  25. Michigan Secretary of State. Michigan.gov/SOS. “Elections”. “Campaign Finance Disclosure”. “Committee Search”. “All Kids First!”. Accessed April 27, 2020. https://cfrsearch.nictusa.com/documents/187823/details?type=scanned&page=1 ^
  26. Randazzo, Anthony. “Pension Reform Case Study: Michigan”. Reason Foundation. Policy Study 434. March, 2014. Accessed April 27, 2020. http://masonlec.org/site/rte_uploads/files/Randazzo%2C%20Anthony%20-%20Pension%20Reform%20Case%20Study%20Michigian.pdf ^
  27. Boyd, William Lowe; Plank, David N.; Sykes, Gary. “Teachers’ Unions in Hard Times”. Paper prepared for the conference on “Teachers’ Unions and Educational Reform” held at the Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University. September 24-25, 1998. Accessed April 27, 2020. http://www.educ.msu.edu/epc/forms/union.pdf ^
  28. Michigan Senate Fiscal Agency. Senate.michigan.gov. “Departments”. “Senate Fiscal Agency”. “data”. “Pension and health liabilities. May 21, 2019. Accessed April 27, 2020. https://www.senate.michigan.gov/sfa/Departments/DataCharts/DCret_Pension&HealthLiabilities.pdf ^
  29. Gantert, Tom. “Michigan Teacher Pension System Liabilities Increase Again”. Michigan capitol Confidential. June 13, 2014. Accessed April 27, 2020. https://www.michigancapitolconfidential.com/20186 ^
  30. Randazzo, Anthony. “Pension Reform Case Study: Michigan”. Reason Foundation. Policy Study 434. March, 2014.  Accessed April 27, 2020.  http://masonlec.org/site/rte_uploads/files/Randazzo%2C%20Anthony%20-%20Pension%20Reform%20Case%20Study%20Michigian.pdf ^
  31. Mack, Julie. “A look at the history of MPSERS — and claims that the retirement fund was robbed by former Gov. John Engler”. MLive. April 8, 2012. Updated January 20, 2019. Accessed April 27, 2020. https://www.mlive.com/education/2012/04/a_look_at_the_history_of_mpser.html ^
  32. McVicar, Brian. “Changes to Michigan’s teacher retirement system signed into law by Gov. Snyder”. MLive. July 13, 2017. Updated January 19, 2019. Accessed April 27, 2020. https://www.mlive.com/news/2017/07/changes_to_michigans_teacher_r.html ^
  33. Michigan Education Association. “Pension Bills Introduced – ACT NOW!”. Mea.org. May 23, 2017. Accessed April 27, 2020. https://mea.org/pension-bills-introduced-act-now/ ^
  34. Gilroy, Leonard; Randazzo, Anthony; Takash, Daniel. “Michigan Adopts Most Innovative Teacher Pension Reform in the Nation”. Reason Foundation. Reason.org. “Commentary”. June 16, 2017. Accessed April 27, 2020. https://reason.org/commentary/michigan-adopts-most-innovative-teacher-pension-reform-in-the-nation/ ^
  35. The Campaign Finance Institute. Followthemoney.org. “2011-2012 Ballot Measure Overview”. March 3, 2014. Accessed April 27, 2020. https://www.followthemoney.org/research/institute-reports/2011-2012-ballot-measure-overview ^
  36. Michigan Catholic Conference. “2012 Statewide Ballot Proposals”.Focus. October, 2012. Accessed April 27, 2020. http://www.micatholic.org/advocacy/focus/2012/focus-20121001-2012statewideballotproposals.pdf ^
  37. Higgins, Sean. “Unions struggle to explain defeat of Michigan anti-right to work ballot proposal”. Washington Examiner. November 7, 2012. Accessed March 1, 2020. https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/unions-struggle-to-explain-defeat-of-michigan-anti-right-to-work-ballot-proposal ^
  38. CRC Staff. “Michigan’s Prop 2: The Great Union Power Grab / Government unions try to set themselves up as a super-legislature—and fail”. Capital Research Center. December 5, 2012. Accessed March 1, 2020. https://capitalresearch.org/article/michigans-prop-2-the-great-union-power-grab-government-unions-try-to-set-themselves-up-as-a-super-legislature-and-fail/  ^
  39. Murray, Dave. “Michigan Proposal 2: Unions point to strong support for collective bargaining despite landslide loss”. MLive. November 7, 2012. Accessed March 1, 2020. https://www.mlive.com/politics/2012/11/michigan_proposal_2_unions_say.html ^
  40. Haglund, Rick. “Next up after Proposal 2 defeat: Right to Work bill?”. MLive. November 8, 2012. Accessed March 2, 2020. https://www.mlive.com/politics/2012/11/bid_to_head_off_right_to_work.html ^
  41. Martin, Tim. “Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder: Right to work ‘on the agenda’ but no decisions made”. MLive. December 4, 2012. Accessed March 1, 2020. https://www.mlive.com/politics/2012/12/michigan_gov_ricksnyder_right.html ^
  42. Spangler, Todd; Snavely, Brent. “Labor loses ground in former stronghold”. Detroit Free Press. December 9, 2012.  Accessed March 1, 2020. https://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2012/12/08/labor-loses-ground/1756041/ ^
  43. Martin, Tim. “Michigan Gov. Rick Snyder: Right to work ‘on the agenda’ but no decisions made”. MLive. December 4, 2012. Accessed March 1, 2020. https://www.mlive.com/politics/2012/12/michigan_gov_ricksnyder_right.html ^
  44. Gabbatt, Adam. “Michigan right-to-work legislation draws thousands of union protesters”. The Guardian. December 11, 2012. Accessed March 1, 2020. https://www.theguardian.com/world/2012/dec/11/michigan-work-legislation-union-protesters ^
  45. Michigan Education Association Facebook page. “A special message from MEA President Steve Cook”. December 10, 2012. https://www.facebook.com/notes/michigan-education-association/a-special-message-from-mea-president-steve-cook/10151346491548923/ ^
  46. CBS Detroit. Detroit.cbslocal.com “Violence Breaks Out Amid Right-To-Work Protests”. December 11, 2012. Accessed March 1, 2020. https://detroit.cbslocal.com/2012/12/11/violence-breaks-out-amid-right-to-work-protests/ ^
  47. Oosting, Jonathan. “Michigan right to work: Tensions rise as Americans For Prosperity tent falls outside Capitol”. MLive. December 11, 2012. Updated January 20, 2019. Accessed March 1, 2020. https://www.mlive.com/politics/2012/12/michigan_right_to_work_tension.html ^
  48. CBS Detroit. Detroit.cbslocal.com “Violence Breaks Out Amid Right-To-Work Protests”. December 11, 2012.  Accessed March 1, 2020. https://detroit.cbslocal.com/2012/12/11/violence-breaks-out-amid-right-to-work-protests/ ^
  49. Holland, Meegan. “Live blog: Michigan right-to-work debate and protest coverage (photos,video)”. MLive. December 12, 2012. Updated January 20, 2019. Accessed March 1, 2020. https://www.mlive.com/politics/2012/12/live_blog_michigan_right_to_wo.html ^
  50. Eggert, David. “Gov. Snyder signs right-to-work law, calls it ‘major day in Michigan’s history’”. MLive. December 11, 2012. Updated January 20, 2019. Accessed March 1, 2020. https://www.mlive.com/news/2012/12/gov_snyder_signs_right-to-work.html ^
  51. Gantert, Tom. “Union Will Use ‘Any Legal Means’ to Combat Members Who Want to Leave”. Capitol Confidential. January 21, 2013. Accessed April 27, 2020. https://www.michigancapitolconfidential.com/18197 ^
  52. Dykstra, Anne Schrieber. “MEA Lauches Personal Attack Against Dissident Teacher, Releases Confidential Information”. Capitol Confidential. June 19, 2015. Accessed April 27, 2020. https://www.michigancapitolconfidential.com/21428 ^
  53. Reitz, Michael J. “Unions claim to avoid Janus disaster — but are they?”. The Hill. November 10, 2018. Accessed April 27, 2020. https://thehill.com/opinion/judiciary/415214-unions-claim-to-avoid-janus-disaster-but-are-they ^
  54. Skorup, Jarrett. “School employees dump Michigan Education Association in droves”. Dearborn-Dearborn Heights Times Herald. January 26, 2019. Accessed April 27, 2020.  https://www.downriversundaytimes.com/2019/01/26/school-employees-dump-michigan-education-association-in-droves/ ^
  55. Gantert, Tom. “Despite Bluster And Bullying, 32,208 Left Teachers Union Since Right-To-Work” Capitol Confidential. September 19, 2019. Accessed April 27, 2020. https://www.michigancapitolconfidential.com/despite-bluster-and-bullying-32208-left-teachers-union-since-right-to-work ^
  56. Cortes, Alex; Skorup, Jarrett. “Why Do Taxpayers Get the Bill for a Union President’s Pension?”. Wall Street Journal. May 30, 2017. Accessed April 27, 2020. https://www.wsj.com/articles/why-do-taxpayers-get-the-bill-for-a-union-presidents-pension-1496187459 ^
  57. Skorup, Jarrett. “Column: Say ‘no’ to spiked MEA pensions”. The Detroit News. May 17, 2018. Accessed April 27, 2020. https://www.detroitnews.com/story/opinion/2018/05/17/spiked-mea-pensions/34996615/ ^
  58. Jacques, Ingrid. “MEA boss scores hefty state pension”. The Detroit News. March 19, 2015. Accessed April 27, 2020. https://www.detroitnews.com/story/opinion/columnists/ingrid-jacques/2015/03/19/jacques-union-boss-big-pension/25040027/ ^
  59. Michigan Education Association. Return of Organization Exempt from Income Tax (Form 990). 2017. Accessed April 27, 2020. https://apps.irs.gov/pub/epostcard/cor/380827000_201808_990O_2019091316646911.pdf ^
  60. Skorup, Jarrett. “School employees dump Michigan Education Association in droves”. Dearborn-Dearborn Heights Times Herald. January 26, 2019. Accessed April 27, 2020.   https://www.downriversundaytimes.com/2019/01/26/school-employees-dump-michigan-education-association-in-droves/ ^
  61. Marianno, Beadley D.; Strunk, Katherine. “After Janus”. Education Next. Fall, 2018. Accessed April 27, 2020. https://www.educationnext.org/after-janus-new-era-teachers-union-activism-agency-fees/ ^
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Nonprofit Information

  • Accounting Period: August - July
  • Tax Exemption Received: January 1, 1945

  • Available Filings

    Period Form Type Total revenue Total functional expenses Total assets (EOY) Total liabilities (EOY) Unrelated business income? Total contributions Program service revenue Investment income Comp. of current officers, directors, etc. Form 990
    2017 Aug Form 990 $60,354,655 $70,932,788 $62,635,863 $279,543,206 Y $0 $53,985,562 $334,506 $928,323 PDF
    2016 Aug Form 990 $59,158,906 $82,397,162 $65,618,867 $313,363,593 Y $0 $53,592,180 $258,688 $1,199,664
    2015 Aug Form 990 $68,715,872 $65,667,623 $72,937,021 $304,111,074 Y $0 $63,056,330 $243,743 $812,385 PDF
    2014 Aug Form 990 $68,668,606 $68,480,389 $69,953,558 $206,188,562 Y $0 $62,352,138 $294,258 $805,195 PDF
    2013 Aug Form 990 $78,942,157 $78,858,103 $68,119,570 $181,529,559 Y $0 $72,635,522 $480,054 $889,352 PDF
    2012 Aug Form 990 $73,136,270 $77,929,799 $63,633,015 $224,137,977 Y $0 $66,972,104 $559,172 $1,386,466 PDF

    Additional Filings (PDFs)

    Michigan Education Association (MEA)

    PO BOX 2573
    EAST LANSING, MI 48826-2573