Labor Union

Fraternal Order of Police Grand Lodge

Website:

www.fop.net/

Tax ID:

23-1283161

Tax-Exempt Status:

501(c)(8)

Budget (2017):

Revenue: $6,188,046
Expenses: $5,267,397
Assets: $11,575,403

Formation:

1952

Type:

National Police Officers’ Union

Executive Director:

James Pasco

The Fraternal Order of Police (FOP) is a membership association and labor union comprised of more than 330,000 law enforcement officers. Officers are members of local chapters known as “lodges,” which act as labor unions or fraternal organizations, and number over 2,200 nationwide. The FOP claims to improve working conditions for police officers as well as maintain safety for the public through education, community involvement, and legislation, among other things.[1] Lodges engage in collective bargaining on behalf of police officers in states that permit such bargaining.[2]

The FOP has a full-time lobbying component, the Steve Young Law Enforcement Legislative Advocacy Center, which advocates for or against legislation to protect government worker labor unions, law enforcement, and the FOP’s interests.[3] The FOP has spent nearly $6 million lobbying since 1998.[4] In the 116th Congress, FOP supported legislation like the Social Security Fairness Act, legislation that would eliminate the exemption for state and local government workers from Social Security;[5] the Law Enforcement Officers Equity Act covering police retirement administration;[6] and the Public Safety Employer-Employee Cooperation Act, legislation that would require states and municipalities to engage in collective bargaining with police unions like the FOP local lodges.[7][8]

The FOP opposes any potential legislation that may negatively affect law enforcement, including legislation that would weaken protections for police officers regarding healthcare and overtime, create or support civilian review boards, or normalize relations with countries like Cuba and Mexico, which the FOP deems safe havens for “cop-killers.” [9] The FOP also opposes any amendment or legislation that would weaken the Civil Asset Forfeiture Reform Act (CAFRA) of 2000.[10] CAFRA was seen as favoring law enforcement over citizens by only increasing law enforcement’s burden of proof to a preponderance of evidence, as opposed to clear and convincing evidence, when seizing property alleged to have been used for criminal purposes. CAFRA also allowed formerly secret information to be shared between prosecutors and authorities seeking civil asset forfeiture.[11]

Though the FOP has supported some Republicans (most prominently endorsing Republican candidate Donald Trump in the 2016 Presidential election[12]), its federal political action committee has in most election cycles contributed the larger share of its donations to Democrats; in 2014, it made no contributions to any federal Republicans, according to data compiled by the Center for Responsive Politics.[13]

The FOP was established in 1915 by two police officers in Pittsburgh. It became a national organization in 1917.[14]

Activities

Collective Bargaining and Representation

In states that permit collective bargaining for state and municipal government workers and in relations with the federal government, Fraternal Order of Police local lodges engage in collective bargaining. FOP-negotiated contracts have included provisions providing for the destruction of officer disciplinary records,[15] granting officers accused of misconduct a so-called “cooling off period” during which they cannot be interrogated,[16] and establish arbitration procedures that have led to fired officers being reinstated.[17] The power of FOP locals exercised in collective bargaining has led some major city officials to call the union “the elephant in the room” in obstructing efforts to increase public accountability.[18]

Lobbying

The FOP maintains an active lobbying presence in Washington, DC., the Steve Young Law Enforcement Legislative Advocacy Center. The Center lobbies the Administration and Congress on issues affecting law enforcement agencies and police officers.[19] Since 1998, the FOP has spent nearly $6 million lobbying.[20]

In the 116th Congress, the FOP’s top priorities are supporting the Social Security Fairness Act, the Law Enforcement Officers Equity Act, and the Public Safety Employer-Employee Cooperation Act, which would require municipalities and states to engage in collective bargaining with police unions.[21]

The FOP opposes potential legislation that may negatively affect law enforcement, as individual officers and as an organization. Specifically, the FOP opposes any new legislation that would weaken protections for police officers regarding health care and overtime. The FOP is also against any legislation that would create or support civilian review boards, normalize relations with countries like Cuba and Mexico, which the FOP deems safe havens for “cop-killers,” and any amendment or legislation that would weaken the Civil Asset Forfeiture Reform Act (CAFRA) of 2000.[22]

CAFRA was largely seen as a compromise favoring the government and law enforcement over citizens. CAFRA only increased law enforcement’s burden of proof to a preponderance of evidence, as opposed to clear and convincing evidence. CAFRA also allowed formerly secret information to be shared between prosecutors and authorities seeking civil asset forfeiture.[23]

At the state level, FOP lodges and state chapters have aggressively pushed the adoption of so-called “Law Enforcement Officers’ Bill of Rights” laws that place many of the controversial provisions of police collective bargaining agreements under the guarantee of state law.[24]

Political Activities

In 2016, the FOP endorsed Donald Trump for president. The organization had not made an endorsement for a presidential election since its 1996 endorsement of Bill Clinton.[25]

FOP’s federal political action committee has in most election cycles contributed the larger share of its donations to Democrats; in 2014, it made no contributions to any federal Republicans, according to data compiled by the Center for Responsive Politics.[26]

People

The highest compensated employees at the FOP are executive director James Pasco at $132,851; senior legislative liaison Tim Richardson at $124,886; Labor Services associate general counsel Michael Coviello at $102,236; and Labor Service director Timothy Mullaney, Sr. at $102,782. [27]

Larry H. James serves as General Counsel for the FOP.[28]

Board of Directors

The FOP’s board is exclusively made up of law enforcement officers. Executive board members include President Patrick Yoes, Vice President Joe Gamaldi, Secretary Jimmy Holderfield, Treasurer Tom Penoza, Second Vice President Les Neri, Sergeant at Arms Keith Turney, and Trustees Chairman Rob Pride.[29] All members of the executive board and nearly all trustees of the board are compensated. [30]

References

  1. “About the Fraternal Order of Police.” Fraternal Order of Police, Grand Lodge. Accessed June 3, 2020. https://www.fop.net/CmsPage.aspx?id=223. ^
  2. Fraternal Order of Police Grand Lodge. “Labor Services.” fop.net, 2020. https://www.fop.net/CmsPage.aspx?id=23. ^
  3. “Steve Young Law Enforcement Legislative Advocacy Center.” Fraternal Order of Police, Grand Lodge. Accessed June 3, 2020. https://www.fop.net/CmsPage.aspx?id=34. ^
  4. “Client Profile: National Fraternal Order of Police.” The Center for Responsive Politics. Accessed June 6, 2020. https://www.opensecrets.org/federal-lobbying/clients/summary?cycle=1998&id=D000027848. ^
  5. Social Security Fairness Act. Bill (2019). ^
  6. Law Enforcement Officers Equity Act. Bill (2019). ^
  7. Public Safety Employer-Employee Cooperation Act. Bill (2019). ^
  8. “Legislation Supported by the FOP in the 116th Congress.” Fraternal Order of Police, Grand Lodge. Accessed June 3, 2020. https://www.fop.net/CmsPage.aspx?id=36. ^
  9. “Legislation Opposed by the FOP in the 116th Congress.” Fraternal Order of Police, Grand Lodge. Accessed June 3, 2020. https://www.fop.net/CmsPage.aspx?id=35. ^
  10. “Legislation Opposed by the FOP in the 116th Congress.” Fraternal Order of Police, Grand Lodge. Accessed June 3, 2020. https://www.fop.net/CmsPage.aspx?id=35. ^
  11. “Civil Asset Forfeiture.” Criminal Justice Policy Foundation. Accessed June 6, 2020. https://www.cjpf.org/civil-asset-forfeiture. ^
  12. Jackman, Tom. “Fraternal Order of Police union endorses Trump.” The Washington Post, September 16, 2016. https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/true-crime/wp/2016/09/16/fraternal-order-of-police-union-endorses-trump/. ^
  13. Center for Responsive Politics. “National Fraternal Order of Police.” OpenSecrets.org. Accessed June 29, 2020. https://www.opensecrets.org/pacs/lookup2.php?cycle=2018?cycle=2018&strID=C00382556   ^
  14. “A History of the Fraternal Order of Police.” Fraternal Order of Police, Grand Lodge. Accessed June 3, 2020. https://www.fop.net/CmsPage.aspx?id=13. ^
  15. Smith, Mailee. “Chicago Police Union Can No Longer Destroy Misconduct Records, Court Rules.” Illinois Policy, June 26, 2020. https://www.illinoispolicy.org/illinois-supreme-court-denies-chicago-police-union-request-to-destroy-misconduct-records/. ^
  16. Krayewski, Ed. “How Police Unions Contribute to the Police Violence Problem.” Reason.com. Reason, June 1, 2015. https://reason.com/2015/06/01/how-police-unions-contribute-to-the-poli/. ^
  17. Lucia, Bill. “Power to Rework Criticized Police Contracts Lies With Elected Leaders.” Route Fifty. Route Fifty, June 21, 2020. https://www.routefifty.com/public-safety/2020/06/police-union-contracts-collective-bargaining-arbitration-mayors-cities/166303/. ^
  18. Gambacorta, David, Juliana Feliciano Reyes, William Bender, and Sean Collins Walsh. “Philly’s Police Union Spent Decades Amassing Power. Reforms Could Cut Its Clout,” June 19, 2020. https://www.inquirer.com/news/pennsylvania/philadelphia-police-union-reform-george-floyd-fop-john-mcnesby-20200619.html. ^
  19. “Steve Young Law Enforcement Legislative Advocacy Center.” Fraternal Order of Police, Grand Lodge. Accessed June 3, 2020. https://www.fop.net/CmsPage.aspx?id=34. ^
  20. “Client Profile: National Fraternal Order of Police.” The Center for Responsive Politics. Accessed June 6, 2020. https://www.opensecrets.org/federal-lobbying/clients/summary?cycle=1998&id=D000027848. ^
  21. “Legislation Supported by the FOP in the 116th Congress.” Fraternal Order of Police, Grand Lodge. Accessed June 3, 2020. https://www.fop.net/CmsPage.aspx?id=36. ^
  22. “Legislation Opposed by the FOP in the 116th Congress.” Fraternal Order of Police, Grand Lodge. Accessed June 3, 2020. https://www.fop.net/CmsPage.aspx?id=35. ^
  23. “Civil Asset Forfeiture.” Criminal Justice Policy Foundation. Accessed June 6, 2020. https://www.cjpf.org/civil-asset-forfeiture. ^
  24. McCorkel, Jill. “Police Unions Are One of the Biggest Obstacles to Transforming Policing.” The Conversation, June 12, 2020. https://theconversation.com/police-unions-are-one-of-the-biggest-obstacles-to-transforming-policing-140227. ^
  25. Jackman, Tom. “Fraternal Order of Police union endorses Trump.” The Washington Post, September 16, 2016. https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/true-crime/wp/2016/09/16/fraternal-order-of-police-union-endorses-trump/. ^
  26. Center for Responsive Politics. “National Fraternal Order of Police.” OpenSecrets.org. Accessed June 29, 2020. https://www.opensecrets.org/pacs/lookup2.php?cycle=2018?cycle=2018&strID=C00382556   ^
  27. Fraternal Order of Police Grand Lodge, Return of Organization Exempt From Income Tax (Form 990), 2017, Part VII, Section A, Line 1a. ^
  28. “General Counsel.” Fraternal Order of Police, Grand Lodge. Accessed June 3, 2020. https://www.fop.net/CmsPage.aspx?id=16. ^
  29. “Executive Board.” Fraternal Order of Police, Grand Lodge. Accessed June 3, 2020. https://www.fop.net/CmsPage.aspx?id=19. ^
  30. Fraternal Order of Police Grand Lodge, Return of Organization Exempt From Income Tax (Form 990), 2017, Part VII, Section A, Line 1a. ^
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Nonprofit Information

  • Accounting Period: June - May
  • Tax Exemption Received: October 1, 1952

  • Available Filings

    Period Form Type Total revenue Total functional expenses Total assets (EOY) Total liabilities (EOY) Unrelated business income? Total contributions Program service revenue Investment income Comp. of current officers, directors, etc. Form 990
    2017 Jun Form 990 $6,188,046 $5,267,397 $11,575,403 $3,551,270 Y $15,265 $5,757,532 $58,519 $312,344
    2016 Jun Form 990 $6,107,927 $5,298,597 $10,401,516 $3,492,470 Y $21,140 $5,641,907 $64,492 $294,925
    2015 Jun Form 990 $5,508,103 $4,744,539 $9,815,059 $3,625,415 Y $18,730 $5,167,029 $58,434 $247,299 PDF
    2013 Jun Form 990 $4,855,643 $4,372,098 $9,095,258 $3,783,753 Y $53,864 $3,087,711 $45,663 $276,320 PDF
    2012 Jun Form 990 $4,540,781 $4,806,095 $8,450,041 $3,729,426 Y $69,504 $3,092,976 $79,485 $302,957 PDF
    2011 Jun Form 990 $4,524,258 $4,142,425 $8,811,313 $3,890,752 N $24,385 $3,185,916 $204,403 $217,022 PDF

    Additional Filings (PDFs)