Labor Union

Florida AFL-CIO

Website:

flaflcio.org/

Location:

TALLAHASSEE, FL

Tax ID:

59-0832847

Tax-Exempt Status:

501(c)(5)

Budget (2017):

Revenue: $2,250,523
Expenses: $2,197,206
Assets: $569,517

Formation:

1958

President:

Mike Williams

Florida AFL-CIO is a state affiliate of the national left-of-center American Federation of  Labor – Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO). [1] Florida AFL-CIO is an umbrella organization for labor unions in Florida, including over one million union members, over 500 local labor union affiliates, and ten labor councils. [2]

Florida AFL-CIO pursues a left-of-center political agenda that mirrors that of the national AFL-CIO. Florida AFL-CIO has adopted left-of-center gun control and immigration policies,[3] advocated for raising the minimum wage to $15 per hour,[4] and supported increasing unemployment benefits. [5] Florida AFL-CIO has participated in protests,[6] funded  programs on behalf of Democrats,[7] and lobbied for favorable legislation to support left-of-center policy initiatives. [8]

Andrew Spar, secretary and treasurer of the Florida AFL-CIO and vice president of Florida AFL-CIO affiliate Florida Education Association,[9] has been a prominent advocate of the lawsuit against Florida Governor Ron DeSantis (R) that seeks to close Florida’s public school system in light of the COVID-19 pandemic. [10]

Background

In 1958, the Florida American Federation of Labor and the Florida Congress of Industrial Organizations merged to create Florida AFL-CIO. [11] Florida AFL-CIO membership includes union members from workforces including education, construction, and healthcare. [12]

Though over one million people are members of Florida AFL-CIO unions, the union has one of the smallest bases in the country, with only six percent of Florida employees registered as union members. Florida unions have blamed Florida’s right-to-work status for low participation, in addition to the Taft-Hartley Act that forbids employers from requiring employees to pay fees to a union. The Florida AFL-CIO has sought to change these policies in an attempt to increase union revenues and power. [13]

Florida AFL-CIO affiliates have drawn criticism for overpaying union employees. The Florida Education Association, the largest labor union in the southeast United State, pays 43 of its employees a salary of roughly $130,000, more than double the average salary of the teachers the union claims to represent. [14] These combined salaries are equal to 25% of the union’s total dues collected in Florida. [15]

Political Advocacy

Florida AFL-CIO has taken a range of left-of-center political stances. Though most of the organization’s political activity has revolved around supporting left-of-center labor policy, Florida AFL-CIO has also taken stances on social issues including gun control and illegal immigration.

Labor Policy

AFL-CIO has advocated for nearly doubling Florida’s minimum wage to $15 an hour from its current $8.56 an hour. [16]  Florida AFL-CIO officials have also argued for increasing unemployment benefits, claiming that every dollar paid in unemployment benefits generates $1.64 in economic returns. [17]  Florida AFL-CIO has even argued for employment policy that stands in the way of immigration enforcement, supporting a bill to prevent Florida insurance companies from reporting illegal immigrants to United States immigration officials. [18]

Florida AFL-CIO has also taken left-of-center stances on trade, protesting against trade at the Free Trade Area of the Americas summit in Miami. The march, supported by the International Socialist Organization, was intended to oppose the alleged American agenda of global economic expansion. [19]

Social Policy

Florida AFL-CIO has supported left-of-center policy more generally, most notably by attacking state preemption over local governments. Florida AFL-CIO opposed state bills that aimed to restrict the actions of local governments, opposing bills that would prevent the establishment of immigration sanctuary cities, block local minimum wage increases, resist local rent control measures, and prevent localities from establishing gun control ordinances contrary to Florida state policy. [20]

Florida AFL-CIO has also supported left-of-center criminal justice initiatives, with former president Cynthia Hall describing Miami as a “police state” and Florida AFL-CIO beginning an initiative to halt the deportation of illegal immigrants. [21] [22]Jacobson, Susan. “Orlando Police Arrest 15 at Immigration-Reform Rally Downtown.” OrlandoSentinel.com, December 7, 2018. https://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/os-xpm-2013-10-29-os-immigration-reform-orlando-20131029-story.html.[/note]

References

  1. “About Florida AFL-CIO: Florida AFL.” CIO. Accessed September 24, 2020. http://flaflcio.org/about/. ^
  2. “Our Unions And Allies: Florida AFL.” CIO. Accessed September 24, 2020. http://flaflcio.org/unions/. ^
  3. Gustavo, Solomon. “Florida’s Local Governments Are Sick and Tired of State Lawmakers Pre-Empting Home Rule, and They’re Starting to Push Back.” Orlando Weekly. Orlando Weekly, August 30, 2020. https://www.orlandoweekly.com/orlando/floridas-local-governments-are-sick-and-tired-of-state-lawmakers-pre-empting-home-rule-and-theyre-starting-to-push-back/Content?oid=26756020. ^
  4. Newberger, Michael, and Mike Williams. “Community Archives: Florida AFL.” CIO, August 22, 2020. http://flaflcio.org/category/community/. ^
  5. Staff, WCJB, Jacquie Franciulli, Amber Pellicone, and Brianda Villegas. “Unemployment Payments Climb to $15 Billion and Counting.” https://www.wcjb.com, September 9, 2020. https://www.wcjb.com/2020/09/09/unemployment-payments-climb-to-15-billion-and-counting/. ^
  6. Jacobson, Susan. “Orlando Police Arrest 15 at Immigration-Reform Rally Downtown.” OrlandoSentinel.com, December 7, 2018. https://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/os-xpm-2013-10-29-os-immigration-reform-orlando-20131029-story.html. ^
  7. “Entity Details.” FLORIDA AFL-CIO – FollowTheMoney.org. Accessed September 24, 2020. https://www.followthemoney.org/entity-details?eid=20136. ^
  8. “Rich Templin.” WFSU News. Accessed September 24, 2020. https://news.wfsu.org/tags/rich-templin. ^
  9. “Andrew Spar – AFT Voices.” Go to AFT Voices. Accessed September 24, 2020. https://aftvoices.org/@VUEpresident. ^
  10. Morrison  | July 20, Cassidy. “Largest Florida Teachers Union Sues DeSantis Administration over School Reopening Plans.” Washington Examiner, July 20, 2020. https://www.washingtonexaminer.com/news/largest-florida-teachers-union-sues-desantis-administration-over-school-reopening-plans. ^
  11. “About Florida AFL-CIO: Florida AFL.” CIO. Accessed September 24, 2020. http://flaflcio.org/about/.

    ^

  12. “About Florida AFL-CIO: Florida AFL.” CIO. Accessed September 24, 2020. http://flaflcio.org/about/. ^
  13. Contorno, Steve. “Democrats Vie for Labor Vote as 2020 Looms. Are Florida Workers Watching?” Tampa Bay Times. Tampa Bay Times, December 19, 2019. https://www.tampabay.com/florida-politics/buzz/2019/12/19/democrats-vie-for-labor-vote-as-2020-looms-are-florida-workers-watching/. ^
  14. “Home.” Florida Education Association. Accessed September 24, 2020. https://feaweb.org/about-fea/. ^
  15. “Florida’s State Teachers Union Has 43 Employees Making over $100K a Year.” The Capitolist, August 11, 2016. https://thecapitolist.com/floridas-state-teachers-union-has-43-employees-making-over-100k-a-year/. ^
  16. Fox, Greg. “Amendment on Florida Ballot Could Raise Minimum Wage.” WESH. WESH, September 8, 2020. https://www.wesh.com/article/amendment-2-florida-minimum-wage/33944701. ^
  17. Staff, WCJB, Jacquie Franciulli, Amber Pellicone, and Brianda Villegas. “Unemployment Payments Climb to $15 Billion and Counting.” https://www.wcjb.com, September 9, 2020. https://www.wcjb.com/2020/09/09/unemployment-payments-climb-to-15-billion-and-counting/. ^
  18. Michael Grabell, Howard Berkes. “Florida Bill Seeks to Stop Arrests of Injured Immigrant Workers.” ProPublica, February 6, 2018. https://www.propublica.org/article/florida-bill-seeks-to-stop-arrests-of-injured-immigrant-workers. ^
  19. SUSTAR, LEE. Defying the police state in Miami, December 5, 2003. https://socialistworker.org/2003-2/478/478_06_Miami.php. ^
  20. Gustavo, Solomon. “Florida’s Local Governments Are Sick and Tired of State Lawmakers Pre-Empting Home Rule, and They’re Starting to Push Back.” Orlando Weekly. Orlando Weekly, August 30, 2020. https://www.orlandoweekly.com/orlando/floridas-local-governments-are-sick-and-tired-of-state-lawmakers-pre-empting-home-rule-and-theyre-starting-to-push-back/Content?oid=26756020. ^
  21. SUSTAR, LEE. Defying the police state in Miami, December 5, 2003. https://socialistworker.org/2003-2/478/478_06_Miami.php. ^
  22. ^
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Nonprofit Information

  • Accounting Period: December - November
  • Tax Exemption Received: May 1, 1956

  • Available Filings

    Period Form Type Total revenue Total functional expenses Total assets (EOY) Total liabilities (EOY) Unrelated business income? Total contributions Program service revenue Investment income Comp. of current officers, directors, etc. Form 990
    2017 Dec Form 990 $2,250,523 $2,197,206 $569,517 $974,145 N $0 $2,215,273 $0 $155,830
    2016 Dec Form 990 $2,184,635 $2,154,594 $471,054 $1,021,204 N $0 $2,129,518 $9 $143,261 PDF
    2015 Dec Form 990 $2,228,724 $2,253,123 $549,046 $1,089,569 N $0 $2,220,643 $239 $243,799 PDF
    2014 Dec Form 990 $2,398,416 $2,398,758 $599,308 $1,024,618 N $0 $2,367,670 $11 $236,007 PDF
    2013 Dec Form 990 $2,436,762 $2,671,126 $658,472 $962,425 N $0 $2,292,805 $111 $220,026 PDF
    2012 Dec Form 990 $2,588,735 $2,829,503 $626,391 $921,482 N $0 $2,574,753 $193 $225,672 PDF
    2011 Dec Form 990 $1,849,678 $2,178,465 $887,315 $779,590 N $0 $1,811,771 $438 $200,700 PDF

    Additional Filings (PDFs)

    Florida AFL-CIO

    135 S MONROE STREET
    TALLAHASSEE, FL 32301-4100