Labor Union

American Federation of School Administrators

American Federation of School Administrators (logo) (link)
Website:

theschoolleader.org%20

Location:

WASHINGTON, DC

Tax ID:

51-0243577

Tax-Exempt Status:

501(c)(5)

Budget (2017):

Revenue: $1,530,354
Expenses: $1,476,942
Assets: $2,270,890

President:

Ernest A. Logan

American Federation of School Administrators (AFSA) is a national labor union that represents over 20,000 principals, superintendents, and administrative faculty. School administrators founded AFSA after the United Federation of Teachers (UFT) organized a strike in New York City in 1960, which resulted in wage increases that made New York City teachers the highest paid in the nation. [1] When school administrators did not see similar wage increases, the presidents of 11 supervisory groups in New York formed the Council of Supervisory Associations (CSA) in 1962 to lobby for higher wages. Over the next decade, CSA successfully lobbied for pay increases and written contracts for administrators. [2]

In 1971, the CSA joined the American Federation of Labor-Congress of Industrial Organizations (AFL-CIO), creating an additional national working group called the School Administrators and Supervisors Organizing Committee (SASOC). [3] After growing to 47 local chapters in five years, SASOC petitioned the AFL-CIO to become an independent international union, a request which the AFL-CIO granted in 1976. [4] That year, SASOC changed its name to the American Federation of School Administrators (AFSA).

AFSA is a politically active union, encouraging its members to pursue public office in addition to operating a political action committee to support legislators who promote left-of-center policy. [5] [6] AFSA’s legislative agenda extends beyond supporting labor legislation for school administrators, taking action on a range of left-of-center policy issues, including gun control, limits on charter schools, and expanded federal retirement programs. [7] [8] [9]

Policy Advocacy

Most of AFSA’s work is concentrated around organizing government workers to negotiate for increased wages or expanded benefits. AFSA praised teacher strikes in West Virginia and Kentucky in a March 2019 blog post, calling on other unions to stage similar protests to increase public education funding. [10] In addition to organizing AFSA members directly, AFSA engages in substantial left-of-center advocacy work on both the state and federal level.

Economic Initiatives

AFSA promotes left-of-center economic initiatives that extend beyond public schools. In 2019, AFSA administrators published “Better Schools Won’t Fix America,” an article arguing that large scale wealth redistribution programs would improve education. [11]

AFSA promoted a similar message in its 2020 Summer of Learning series for school administrators. [12] AFSA leaders encouraged administrators to abandon the idea of equality of opportunity in favor of “equity” in educational outcomes,  calling on administrators to change the structure of classrooms to favor historically disadvantaged demographic groups. [13] The program also called on schools to redistribute funding to reach these outcome-based goals, which included educating parents, redirecting school resources to economically disadvantaged students, and investing in improving African-American and Latino graduation rates. [14]

Federal Policy Agenda

AFSA has taken on many federal advocacy initiatives to oppose right-of-center policy. AFSA has been most active in opposing changes to federal education policy. In February of 2018, the Trump administration released a plan to reduce federal funding for continuing education and recruiting school administrators. [15] AFSA joined with several school supervisory organizations to condemn the proposal. [16]

From 2017 to 2019, AFSA opposed President Donald Trump’s proposed reductions to the Department of Education budget, claiming that the actions would “wipe out completely” the Title II-A and Title IV-A programs. [17] Program Title II-A provided $2.1 billion for ongoing teacher education, while Title IV-A provided $1.4 billion to schools for drug and violence prevention programs. [18] AFSA went back on these claims later in the same article, acknowledging that these programs would be replaced by smaller stipend programs in both areas. [19]

In October of 2018, AFSA opposed President Trump’s curtailment of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals Act (DACA), an Obama administration policy that grants children who entered the country illegally temporary protection from deportation. [20] In March of 2019, AFSA joined a list of signatories to endorse a bill which would bar federal funding to purchase firearms or firearm training for teachers, a measure proposed by Secretary of Education Betsy DeVos to increase school safety. [21]

In September of 2020, the AFSA endorsed former Vice President Joe Biden (D) for president of the United States, calling Biden and Vice Presidential nominee Kamala Harris “the best advocates for public schools” while that under the Trump administration the country has “never had a president and education secretary so hostile toward public schools.” [22]

COVID-19 Advocacy

Since the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic, AFSA has engaged in federal advocacy regarding school response. In early March 2020, AFSA called for states to “shut down all U.S. schools” immediately. [23]

When President Donald Trump called on schools to open for in-person learning in the fall of 2020, AFSA joined with the American Federation of Teachers (AFT) to condemn the move. [24] For schools that did choose to open, AFSA called for multiple restrictive measures, including limiting classes to 10 students, and claimed that the return to in-person education would require up to $244.6 billion in additional funding. [25] In September of 2020, AFSA President Ernest Logan called on the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) to use its broadband subsidy program to support family internet bills for low-income students forced to participate in public-school “distance learning.” [26]

Leadership

Ernest A. Logan is the current president of the AFSA, elected in July of 2018. [27] Logan worked in the New York City public school system before becoming president of the New York Council of School Supervisors and Administrators (CSA), a position he held from 2006 to 2017. [28] During his time as CSA president, Logan created a principal evaluation program for New York state and negotiated a new contract for CSA members, which resulted in retroactive pay raises totaling $120 million. [29] [30]

Logan has additional ties to the political left, working as a member of the Education Equality Project, founded by left-wing activist Al Sharpton. [31] Logan is also an active political donor, giving 110 contributions to left-of-center organizations in 2019 and 2020 alone. [32] These include donations to ActBlue, the Democratic National Committee (DNC), and Biden for President. [33]

References

  1. “Our History.” American Federation of School Administrators, June 5, 2019. https://www.theschoolleader.org/about-us/our-history. ^
  2. “Our History.” American Federation of School Administrators, June 5, 2019. https://www.theschoolleader.org/about-us/our-history. ^
  3. “Our History.” American Federation of School Administrators, June 5, 2019. https://www.theschoolleader.org/about-us/our-history. ^
  4. “Our History.” American Federation of School Administrators, June 5, 2019. https://www.theschoolleader.org/about-us/our-history. ^
  5. “Engaging Members for Political Action.” American Federation of School Administrators, July 23, 2020. https://www.theschoolleader.org/our-positions/engaging-members-political-action. ^
  6. “Supporting Candidates That Support Public Education.” American Federation of School Administrators, June 29, 2019. https://www.theschoolleader.org/supporting-candidates-support-public-education. ^
  7. “Empowering Greater School Safety.” American Federation of School Administrators, July 23, 2020. https://www.theschoolleader.org/our-positions/empowering-greater-school-safety. ^
  8. “Charter Schools.” American Federation of School Administrators, April 11, 2019. https://www.theschoolleader.org/our-positions/charter-schools. ^
  9. “Charter Schools.” American Federation of School Administrators, April 11, 2019. https://www.theschoolleader.org/our-positions/charter-schools. ^
  10. “Teacher Strikes Help Entire Community.” American Federation of School Administrators. March 17, 2019. http://archive.afsaadmin.org/teacher-strikes-help-entire-community/. ^
  11. “Better Schools Won’t Fix America.” American Federation of School Administrators, July 1, 2019. https://www.theschoolleader.org/news/better-schools-won-t-fix-america. ^
  12. Mutterperl, Noah. “Creating an Equity Agenda: Cultivating an Ecosystem to Support the School Community.” American Federation of School Administrators, July 22, 2020. https://www.theschoolleader.org/news/creating-equity-agenda-cultivating-ecosystem-support-school-community. ^
  13. Mutterperl, Noah. “Creating an Equity Agenda: Cultivating an Ecosystem to Support the School Community.” American Federation of School Administrators, July 22, 2020. https://www.theschoolleader.org/news/creating-equity-agenda-cultivating-ecosystem-support-school-community. ^
  14. Mutterperl, Noah. “Creating an Equity Agenda: Cultivating an Ecosystem to Support the School Community.” American Federation of School Administrators, July 22, 2020. https://www.theschoolleader.org/news/creating-equity-agenda-cultivating-ecosystem-support-school-community. ^
  15. Superville, Denisa R. “School Leaders Press to Preserve Funding For Leadership Programs.” Education Week , February 23, 2018. http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/District_Dossier/2018/02/trump_education_budget_shows_disregard_for_principals_school_leaders.html. ^
  16. Superville, Denisa R. “School Leaders Press to Preserve Funding For Leadership Programs.” Education Week , February 23, 2018. http://blogs.edweek.org/edweek/District_Dossier/2018/02/trump_education_budget_shows_disregard_for_principals_school_leaders.html. ^
  17. Griswold Administrators Association. “Trump Budget Seeks to Slash Education Funds.” American Federation of School Administrators, March 22, 2019. https://griswold.theschoolleader.org/news/trump-budget-seeks-slash-education-funds. ^
  18. Griswold Administrators Association. “Trump Budget Seeks to Slash Education Funds.” American Federation of School Administrators, March 22, 2019. https://griswold.theschoolleader.org/news/trump-budget-seeks-slash-education-funds. ^
  19. Griswold Administrators Association. “Trump Budget Seeks to Slash Education Funds.” American Federation of School Administrators, March 22, 2019. https://griswold.theschoolleader.org/news/trump-budget-seeks-slash-education-funds. ^
  20. AFSA Web Administration. “Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals and DREAMers Resolution.” American Federation of School Administrators, October 17, 2018. https://www.theschoolleader.org/our-positions/deferred-action-childhood-arrivals-and-dreamers-resolution. ^
  21. “Hayes, Murphy Resolution: Keep Guns Out Of Classrooms.” The Newtown Bee, March 20, 2019. https://www.newtownbee.com/03202019/hayes-murphy-resolution-keep-guns-out-of-classrooms/. ^
  22. Staff Report. “School Leaders Endorse Biden.” njtoday.net. New Jersey Today, September 17, 2020. http://njtoday.net/2020/09/17/school-leaders-endorse-biden/. ^
  23. Laura Meckler, Lena H. Sun. “States Are Rushing to Close Schools. But What Does the Science on Closures Say?” The Washington Post. WP Company, March 17, 2020. https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/education/states-are-rushing-to-close-schools-but-what-does-the-science-on-closures-say/2020/03/16/2cbb64da-6799-11ea-b313-df458622c2cc_story.html. ^
  24. Gruenberg, Mark. “Biden Slams Trump on Unsafe School Reopening Demand.” People’s World, September 4, 2020. https://peoplesworld.org/article/biden-slams-trump-on-unsafe-school-reopening-demand/. ^
  25. Schaffhauser, Dian. “Federation of School Leaders Issues Guide for Reopening Safely.” The Journal, August 10, 2020. https://thejournal.com/articles/2020/08/10/federation-of-school-leaders-issues-guide-for-reopening-safely.aspx. ^
  26. “Sens. Tell FCC To Subsidize Remote Learning Amid COVID-19.” Law360, September 17, 2020. https://www.law360.com/telecom/articles/1311012/sens-tell-fcc-to-subsidize-remote-learning-amid-covid-19. ^
  27. “Ernest A. Logan.” American Federation of School Administrators, September 2018. http://archive.afsaadmin.org/our-union/staff-board/ernest-a-logan/. ^
  28. “Ernest A. Logan.” American Federation of School Administrators, September 2018. http://archive.afsaadmin.org/our-union/staff-board/ernest-a-logan/. ^
  29. Darville, Sarah. “Principals Union Contract Ratified with 91 Percent of the Vote.” Chalkbeat New York. Chalkbeat New York, December 30, 2014. https://ny.chalkbeat.org/2014/12/30/21093245/principals-union-contract-ratified-with-91-percent-of-the-vote. ^
  30. “Commissioner King Releases NYC Teacher and Principal Evaluation Plan.” New York State Education Department, June 1, 2013. http://www.nysed.gov/news/2017/commissioner-king-releases-nyc-teacher-and-principal-evaluation-plan. ^
  31. “Ernest A. Logan.” American Federation of School Administrators, September 2018. http://archive.afsaadmin.org/our-union/staff-board/ernest-a-logan/. ^
  32. “Browse Individual Contributions: Ernest Logan.” FEC.gov. Federal Election Commission (FEC). Accessed September 21, 2020. https://www.fec.gov/data/receipts/individual-contributions/?contributor_name=Ernest+Logan. ^
  33. “Browse Individual Contributions: Ernest Logan.” FEC.gov. Federal Election Commission (FEC). Accessed September 21, 2020. https://www.fec.gov/data/receipts/individual-contributions/?contributor_name=Ernest+Logan. ^

Directors, Employees & Supporters

  1. Diann Woodard
    Former President

Coalition Memberships

  1. Alliance for Retired Americans
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Nonprofit Information

  • Accounting Period: August - July
  • Tax Exemption Received: November 1, 1972

  • Available Filings

    Period Form Type Total revenue Total functional expenses Total assets (EOY) Total liabilities (EOY) Unrelated business income? Total contributions Program service revenue Investment income Comp. of current officers, directors, etc. Form 990
    2017 Aug Form 990 $1,530,354 $1,476,942 $2,270,890 $0 N $0 $1,438,132 $24,004 $325,000
    2016 Aug Form 990 $1,507,755 $1,466,405 $2,217,478 $0 N $0 $1,365,860 $36,993 $257,005
    2015 Aug Form 990 $1,714,562 $1,631,643 $2,176,128 $0 N $0 $1,591,560 $23,389 $291,383 PDF
    2014 Aug Form 990 $1,543,569 $1,583,247 $2,093,209 $0 N $0 $1,369,340 $44,559 $370,283 PDF
    2013 Aug Form 990 $1,402,689 $1,460,590 $2,132,887 $0 N $0 $1,366,374 $39,925 $392,750 PDF
    2012 Aug Form 990 $1,706,495 $1,882,188 $2,190,788 $0 N $0 $1,565,370 $44,684 $358,350 PDF
    2011 Aug Form 990 $1,455,462 $1,525,160 $2,366,481 $0 N $0 $1,351,183 $33,721 $370,400 PDF

    Additional Filings (PDFs)

    American Federation of School Administrators

    1101 17TH ST NW STE 408
    WASHINGTON, DC 20036-4720